Ransomware: Sharp rise in attacks against universities as learning goes online (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Ransomware: Sharp rise in attacks against universities as learning goes online. “The number of ransomware attacks targeting universities has doubled over the past year and the cost of ransomware demands is going up as information security teams struggle to fight off cyberattacks. Analysis of ransomware campaigns against higher education found that attacks against universities during 2020 were up 100 percent compared to 2019, and that the average ransom demand now stands at $447,000.”

University of Tokyo Library System: General Library’s Digital Archives Now Available Through the Internet Archive

University of Tokyo Library System: General Library’s Digital Archives Now Available Through the Internet Archive. “The materials from the General Library now available through the Internet Archive include 4180 items from 25 collections, all of which can be used freely without prior permission. At the Internet Archive, these materials can be viewed online as well as downloaded as PDFs. Also available at the UTokyo Academic Archives Portal, these items can now be found through searches of the Internet Archive’s vast range of resources from institutions throughout the world.”

New York Times: A California University Tries to Shield an Entire City From Coronavirus

New York Times: A California University Tries to Shield an Entire City From Coronavirus. “All last fall, universities across the country were accused of enabling the pandemic’s spread by bringing back students who then endangered local residents, mingling with them in bars, stores and apartments. So U.C. Davis is trying something different. Rather than turning the campus into a protective bubble for students and staff, as some schools have attempted, it has quietly spent the past six months making its campus bubble bigger — big enough, in fact, to encompass the entire city.”

Temple University: Digital archive provides improved access to Temple-based research

Temple University: Digital archive provides improved access to Temple-based research. “TUScholarShare contains articles, preprints, postprints, conference presentations, theses, dissertations and more, produced by Temple faculty, students and staff. The material in TUScholarShareh is open to anyone, giving it a broader reach than most academic scholarship, which typically can only be accessed by those at other colleges and universities with subscriptions to particular journals.” I’m not 100% sure but I think this launched last September.

The Daily Beast: Alabama Sorority Cancels 600-Person Farm Party After Daily Beast Story on ‘Superspreader’ Uproar

The Daily Beast: Alabama Sorority Cancels 600-Person Farm Party After Daily Beast Story on ‘Superspreader’ Uproar. “Members of the Kappa Delta sorority at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa were getting ready on Tuesday for a massive party that, in any other year, would be a routine event. The main difference—besides safety measures like face masks—in a nod to the pandemic? Instead of 600 people at once, organizers promised to bus in three ‘shifts’ or groups of 200 revelers at a time.” Apparently the party was canceled after this article was published.

The Conversation: Why for-profit college enrollment has increased during COVID-19

The Conversation: Why for-profit college enrollment has increased during COVID-19. “When COVID-19 hit the U.S., many experts warned that America’s colleges and universities could be devastated. Some of them predicted enrollment declines of up to 20%. So far, those initial forecasts were worse than what has actually taken place. One month into the fall semester of the 2020-2021 academic year, overall enrollment was only 3% lower than at the same time a year earlier. One kind of school, however, is faring better: for-profit colleges. Their average enrollment is up by 3%.”

The COVID-19 pandemic: How US universities responded (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: The COVID-19 pandemic: How US universities responded. “As the COVID-19 pandemic began in the United States, universities were forced to make difficult operational decisions to help slow the spread of the disease and protect their students, faculty, staff, and community members. Guidance from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention, the World Health Organization (WHO), and other agencies informed these decisions about non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPI)–the only interventions available at the early stages of the pandemic.”

The Auburn Plainsman: Some students retreat from social media

The Auburn Plainsman: Some students retreat from social media. “On social media platforms across the board, likes, shares and comments make people feel happy. Some believe the danger comes when one gets hooked to the hit of neurotransmitters. Suddenly, no like, comment or share can satisfy the craving. In the end, people can find themselves coming back, even if they no longer particularly enjoy it.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: What Does a College Student Look Like? Stock Images From the Quad Are Getting an Update.

Chronicle of Higher Education: What Does a College Student Look Like? Stock Images From the Quad Are Getting an Update.. “For decades, a disproportionate number of stock images have portrayed the experience of one kind of student: the 18- to 22-year-old attending a residential four-year college. But all those fresh-faced kids on tree-shaded quads are, in fact, the minority. (Did you know that only about 15 percent of undergraduates live in campus dorms?) Now, more than ever, some higher-education experts say, the world needs to see more images of students who fit a different description.”

Eyes on the Ties: Five Ways to Research Your University’s Fossil Fuel (and Other) Investments

Eyes on the Ties: Five Ways to Research Your University’s Fossil Fuel (and Other) Investments. “For student organizers building fossil fuel divestment campaigns on their campuses, a first step is finding out what exactly your university is invested in. This information is sometimes hard to discover – indeed, many university investments are undisclosed and shrouded in mystery. But the good news is that you can usually dig up findings on university investments – including those made directly by universities and by private university-affiliated organizations that invest endowments – by using just a few research tactics.”

Inside Higher Ed: A New Home Online for Closed College Libraries?

Inside Higher Ed: A New Home Online for Closed College Libraries?. “Selling parts of the collection wouldn’t net very much money — $3,000 for 3,500 books was Marygrove’s most likely offer, although it had a small chance of selling 32,000 books for $32,000. Buyers weren’t interested in many other media items like DVDs and microfilm, nor were they interested in journal volumes. Even if Marygrove was able to sell 32,000 of its books, librarians estimated it would need to recycle tens of thousands of remaining books and journal volumes, paying as much as $595,000. And that was before it paid to have remaining items that couldn’t be recycled packed and sent to a landfill.”

The 74: D.C.’s Howard University, Other Historically Black Colleges Receive $15M From Gates Foundation to Expand Rapid Testing as U.S. Sees Surge in COVID Cases

The 74: D.C.’s Howard University, Other Historically Black Colleges Receive $15M From Gates Foundation to Expand Rapid Testing as U.S. Sees Surge in COVID Cases. “Historically Black colleges and universities, including Howard University in Washington, D.C., are receiving millions in funding to expand rapid testing on campus as coronavirus cases surge nationwide, falling heaviest on Black and brown communities.”

Washington Post: After a college town’s coronavirus outbreak, deaths at nursing homes mount

Washington Post: After a college town’s coronavirus outbreak, deaths at nursing homes mount. “Mayor Tim Kabat was already on edge as thousands of students returned to La Crosse, Wis., to resume classes this fall at the city’s three colleges. When he saw young people packing downtown bars and restaurants in September, crowded closely and often unmasked, the longtime mayor’s worry turned to dread. Now, more than a month later, La Crosse has endured a devastating spike in coronavirus cases — a wildfire of infection that first appeared predominantly in the student-age population, spread throughout the community and ultimately ravaged elderly residents who had previously managed to avoid the worst of the pandemic.”