University of Calgary: U of Calgary offers a new state-of-the-art home for a massive collection of Western Canadian history

University of Calgary: U of Calgary offers a new state-of-the-art home for a massive collection of Western Canadian history. “Over the past two years, the [University of Calgary’s High Density Library] has welcomed a huge number of new materials as part of a massive, complex relocation of Calgary’s Glenbow Library and Archives – documents and other items reflecting the history of Alberta and Western Canada – to U of Calgary. The transfer of materials, which began in March 2019 and is set to be completed in November 2020, has doubled the university’s archival collection as well as the materials in its rare books and special collections holdings, says Annie Murray, associate university librarian for archives and special collections.”

University of Calgary: Blackfoot Oral Stories Database brought to life by ii’ taa’poh’to’p grant

New-to-me, from the University of Calgary: Blackfoot Oral Stories Database brought to life by ii’ taa’poh’to’p grant. “These stories have helped us to understand the underlying structure of the language and the ways in which it is similar to and different from other languages. But, as we did this work, it became increasingly clear to us that we can and must use our linguistic training to share the stories as they were intended — with members of the community. With this understanding, in 2016, Dr. Heather Bliss, PhD, adjunct assistant professor in the School of Languages, Linguistics, Literatures and Cultures created the Blackfoot Oral Stories Database, an online repository of oral stories. Since that time, the database has grown to include over 100 stories told by more than 20 storytellers.”

University of Calgary: Nursing researcher’s storytelling tool brings together small stories and big data

University of Calgary: Nursing researcher’s storytelling tool brings together small stories and big data. “An empathic cultural map offers detailed, qualitative insights into individual and group experiences of living and working in a particular area. In that sense, with ECM, users can navigate geographical maps on the interactive pages and discover spatial and numeric data, from walkability scores in Calgary neighbourhoods to immigration rates across the globe. But they also encounter audio interviews, scanned journal entries and stories about the new immigrants to Calgary and their personal anecdotes. The juxtaposition encourages users to see links across data which might not always be traditionally evident, with the aim of making connections and seeing key facilitators, blockers or constraints relevant to health.”