How to burst your bubble: broadening your social media horizons (UC Riverside News)

UC Riverside News: How to burst your bubble: broadening your social media horizons. “A computer scientist explains how our online behavior drives us into echo chambers. Evangelos Papalexakis is an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at UC Riverside’s Marlan and Rosemary Bourns College of Engineering. His research spans data science, signal processing, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. One of his ongoing projects aims to develop an automated fake news detection mechanism for social media.”

University of California Riverside: Comprehensive digital photography collection and $500k endowment donated to UCR ARTS

University of California Riverside: Comprehensive digital photography collection and $500k endowment donated to UCR ARTS. “It may be hard to remember a time when images weren’t readily available on the internet. But back in the early 2000s, the online photography collection of photojournalist Jim Steinhart was one of the first and largest to make high resolution images available for licensing and download, offering visitors access to thousands of images amassed over his years traveling the world.”

University of California Riverside: When disaster strikes, a search website for first responders will save lives

University of California Riverside: When disaster strikes, a search website for first responders will save lives. “When Mount Vesuvius erupted almost 2,000 years ago, it took hours for a single message from Pompeii to reach rescuers 18 miles away. Today we have the opposite problem during disasters: too much rapid information from many sources, with consequences just as fatal for some people. Engineers at the University of California, Riverside are working to change this with a tool that searches real-time text, photo and video from social media and surveillance cameras alongside data from sensors, like fire detectors and security alarms. With the tool, for example, firefighters could search the terms ‘fire’ and ‘crowds’ in a particular location and time and receive data from multiple sources.”

University of California Riverside: Free dataset archive helps researchers quickly find a needle in a haystack

University of California Riverside: Free dataset archive helps researchers quickly find a needle in a haystack. “While there are hundreds of publicly available datasets, locating them can take months of searching. When potential sources are found, they rarely provide enough information for a researcher to decide if the set actually contains the kind of data they need without downloading the often huge file and sorting through it first. Thanks to a computer scientist at the University of California, Riverside, finding the right dataset is now as easy as bookmarking a website, and it costs absolutely nothing.”

The Press-Enterprise: Why UC Riverside, local students are writing life stories of veterans buried at Riverside National Cemetery

The Press-Enterprise: Why UC Riverside, local students are writing life stories of veterans buried at Riverside National Cemetery . “The names on the gravestones at Riverside National Cemetery represent not just service people and spouses who have died. They represent vibrant lives, said Allison Hedge Coke, a UC Riverside distinguished professor of creative writing. And their stories deserve to be told, she said. Some will be told, thanks to the work of more than 1,000 students from several Inland schools.”

University of California Riverside: Nearly 6,000 Photographs from the Jay Kay Klein Papers Have Been Digitized

University of California Riverside: Nearly 6,000 Photographs from the Jay Kay Klein Papers Have Been Digitized. “The California Digital Library and the UCR Library recently partnered to digitize nearly 6,000 photographs from the Jay Kay Klein papers – and completed the task in less than two days…. This was the first in a series of pilot projects to use Pixel Acuity’s specialized mass digitization process to make more of the UCR Library’s non-book collections available online. For this inaugural project, [Eric] Milenkiewicz selected 35mm negatives from the Eaton Collection’s Jay Kay Klein papers (MS 381),documenting the World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) from 1960-1971.”