CU Boulder Today: Mathematician using Facebook data in the fight against COVID-19

CU Boulder Today: Mathematician using Facebook data in the fight against COVID-19. “CU Boulder researcher Daniel Larremore has never held a nasal swab and doesn’t wear scrubs. Instead, he relies on math to track the spread of human diseases. This week, Larremore and several colleagues from Colorado joined a nationwide study that seeks to use social media data to better understand how coronavirus cases might grow and travel in the coming weeks. The COVID-19 Mobility Data Network will draw on huge volumes of anonymized location information supplied by Facebook to follow how groups of people move from spot to spot over time. That will allow researchers like Larremore, an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and in the BioFrontiers Institute, to build maps that show where people are still traveling in the age of social distancing.”

University of Colorado Boulder: GeoLibrary Connects Colorado Through GIS Data

University of Colorado Boulder: GeoLibrary Connects Colorado Through GIS Data. “This fall, the University Libraries have officially launched a new collection of geographic information system (GIS) data highlighting the natural and cultural features of Colorado. The Colorado GeoLibrary, the Libraries’ new site for accessing and discovering geospatial data the state, is a data set goldmine, fit for your GIS and mapping project needs.”

Daily Camera: CU Boulder faculty reach millions with website of engineering lesson plans

Daily Camera: CU Boulder faculty reach millions with website of engineering lesson plans. “Fifteen years ago, Jacquelyn Sullivan and her team at the University of Colorado Boulder started a digital library of engineering lesson plans for teachers at the elementary, middle and high school levels. Last year, TeachEngineering got an upgrade and is growing at a rapid rate and helping teachers across the country — for free.”

World Leaders a-Twitter: Communication Platforms and Agenda-Building During the 2018 NATO Summit (U of Colorado Boulder Thesis)

University of Colorado Boulder thesis: World Leaders a-Twitter: Communication Platforms and Agenda-Building During the 2018 NATO Summit. “Twitter is a thriving microblogging service with growing prominence in the political sphere. In this study, I examine the differences between Twitter communications and verbal communications by three heads of state and government in relation to the most recent NATO Summit in July 2018. Through a three-step analysis, including descriptive statistics, content and tone analysis, and comparative analysis, the study investigates Twitter’s influence on content and tone and its agenda-building capacity for face-to-face summits.”

University of Colorado Boulder: Who might be spying on your tweets in the name of science?

University of Colorado Boulder: Who might be spying on your tweets in the name of science?. “The majority of Twitter users are unaware that researchers freely collect and analyze their tweets—including deleted ones—in the name of science. Most believe that this shouldn’t be allowed without their consent. And many wrongly assume it would be a violation of Twitter’s terms of service, according to a new study by researchers from CU Boulder and University of Kentucky.”

University of Colorado Boulder: When celebrities die, ‘grief policing’ abounds, social media gets toxic

University of Colorado Boulder: When celebrities die, ‘grief policing’ abounds, social media gets toxic. “After the deaths of David Bowie, Prince and actor Alan Rickman in 2016, grieving fans flocked to public comment threads on social media to pay their respects in what has been likened to a virtual wake. But many also arrived to find a toxic space where so-called ‘grief police’ mocked them for lamenting the loss of a stranger, chastised them for emotional rubber-necking or even dissed the dead. That’s the key finding of a study published this week by CU Boulder researchers who analyzed more than 7,000 Facebook comments to gain insight into how people mourn death in the internet age. Their conclusion: People are surprisingly mean to each other online even in times of tragedy, but some technological fixes could likely make things better.”

University of Colorado Boulder: Twitter a hotbed of anti-vaccine sentiment, finds CU Boulder study

University of Colorado Boulder: Twitter a hotbed of anti-vaccine sentiment, finds CU Boulder study. “Anti-vaccine sentiment is alive and growing in social media, with California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania showing the most negative tweets of any states, according to a new five-year CU Boulder study. In Colorado, Fort Collins ranked particularly high for the prevalence of anti-vaccine tweets. Regions around the country with high affluence and/or a large number of new moms were most likely to be hotbeds of anti-vaccine Twitter users, the study found.”

Phys.org: CU Boulder to create digital archive of 1.7 million Rocky Mountain botanical specimens

Phys.org: CU Boulder to create digital archive of 1.7 million Rocky Mountain botanical specimens. “University of Colorado Boulder researchers and collaborating institutions have been awarded $2.9 million from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to create a comprehensive digital archive of over 1.7 million plant specimens native to the southern Rocky Mountain region. CU Boulder will serve as the lead institution of an interdisciplinary consortium composed of 38 collaborating partners, which includes universities, botanical gardens, national parks and Native American Nations, who will help compile and cross-reference the specimen data. Specimens from areas of the 10-state region of the Southern Rocky Mountains and High Plains will be located, imaged, entered into a central database and georeferenced.”