Liverpool Echo: University of Liverpool accepts slavery roots after new database of links revealed

Liverpool Echo: University of Liverpool accepts slavery roots after new database of links revealed. “The University of Liverpool has acknowledged the role that proceeds of slavery played in its early beginnings as a group of independent researchers prepare to release information about its links to the notorious trade. The database, which has been put together by the Liverpool Black History Research Group based at the Kuumba Imani centre in Toxteth, explores the relationship between prominent slave traders and one of the University of Liverpool’s forerunner organisations, the Liverpool Royal Institution.” The database will be released next year.

EurekAlert: New study highlights the influence social media has on children’s food intake

EurekAlert: New study highlights the influence social media has on children’s food intake . “New University of Liverpool research, published in Pediatrics, highlights the negative influence that social media has on children’s food intake. Current research shows celebrity endorsement and television advertising of unhealthy foods increases children’s intake of these foods. However, children are increasingly exposed to marketing through digital avenues, such as on social media, and the impact of marketing by YouTube video bloggers (vloggers) on these outcomes has, until now, not been known.”

Revealed: how YOUR ancestors could have been convicts transported to Australia (The Echo)

The Echo: Revealed: how YOUR ancestors could have been convicts transported to Australia. “A new website will allow genealogists and family historians to discover the fate of ancestors convicted of crimes and transported overseas. The free-to-use website draws on over 4m court records and uncovers how punishment affected the lives of tens of thousands of people convicted of crimes at the Old Bailey between 1780 and 1925. The project to create the website was led by academics at The University of Liverpool. The records reveal a vast amount of information, such as the names, year and place of birth, previous offences, height, eye colour and whether the convict could read or write.”