University of New Mexico Health Sciences: The Devil is in the Data

University of New Mexico Health Sciences, and I really really really hate this headline: The Devil is in the Data. “In a paper published last month in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, the team reported their finding that instances of self-harm among people with major mental illness seeking medical care might actually be as much as 19 times higher than what is reported in the billing records.”

University of New Mexico: Visiting scholar awarded Digital Collections Fellowship

University of New Mexico: Visiting scholar awarded Digital Collections Fellowship. “Daniel Webb, a visiting scholar at The University of New Mexico’s Center for Regional Studies (CRS), has been awarded a Digital Collections Fellowship by the Omohundro Institute of Early American Culture and History for the digitization of archival documents and materials relating to Apache (Ndé) history. The project will receive funding in the amount of $5,000.”

University of New Mexico: UNM is opening virtual doors to its plant collections

University of New Mexico: UNM is opening virtual doors to its plant collections. “Hidden among the shelves and cabinets of natural history collections lie thousands of preserved plant specimens that represent the diverse flora of our planet. Scientists and researchers physically access these collections around the world in order to address challenges that threaten humanity and our environment. These specimens are rich sources of information about our planet’s biodiversity and history. Their usefulness is limited because the number of people who can visit is limited; by providing digital access to the collections, The University of New Mexico’s Herbarium is opening its doors to the global community. The UNM Herbarium, a division of the Museum of Southwestern Biology, is bringing digital life to the thousands of plant specimens within the herbarium. The herbarium houses well over 135,000 plant specimens, representing 10,300 taxa, making it New Mexico’s largest collection of plants from the Southwest region.”