WRAL: Fraternity parties concern members of UNC, Chapel Hill communities

WRAL: Fraternity parties concern members of UNC, Chapel Hill communities. “Photographs surfaced on Saturday night of a party outside three fraternity houses on Cameron Avenue in Chapel Hill. According to witnesses, the party was in violation of Orange County’s maximum gathering size of 25 people in outdoor settings. Some members of the community are concerned about the potential consequences for activities like these.”

ProPublica: Near Misses at UNC Chapel Hill’s High-Security Lab Illustrate Risk of Accidents With Coronaviruses

ProPublica: Near Misses at UNC Chapel Hill’s High-Security Lab Illustrate Risk of Accidents With Coronaviruses. “Reports indicate UNC researchers were potentially exposed to lab-created coronaviruses in several incidents since 2015. These incidents highlight the risks even in the most secure and respected research facilities.”

Washington Post: UNC-Chapel Hill pivots to remote teaching after coronavirus spreads among students during first week of class

Washington Post: UNC-Chapel Hill pivots to remote teaching after coronavirus spreads among students during first week of class. “The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, one of the largest schools in the country to bring students to campus for in-person teaching, said [August 17] that it will pivot to all-remote instruction for undergraduates after testing showed a pattern of rapid spread of the novel coronavirus. The shift signaled enormous challenges ahead for those in higher education who are pushing for professors and students to be able to meet on campus. Officials announced the abrupt change just a week after classes began at the 30,000-student state flagship university.”

Daily Tar Heel: Records from before reopening show experts warned UNC of COVID-19 outbreaks

Daily Tar Heel: Records from before reopening show experts warned UNC of COVID-19 outbreaks. “Students, faculty and staff are saying they expected UNC to close due to COVID-19 spikes before the announcement Monday that undergraduate courses would shift to remote learning — and documents obtained by The Daily Tar Heel show that the administration received warning months ago from top medical professionals at the University. Experts sent messages about the likelihood of a COVID-19 outbreak in the event that the University reopened dorms and on-campus experiences.”

University of North Carolina: ‘Heroes Health’ mental wellness app launched by School of Medicine and UNC Health

University of North Carolina: ‘Heroes Health’ mental wellness app launched by School of Medicine and UNC Health. “The UNC School of Medicine and UNC Health have launched the Heroes Health Initiative to help support the mental health of first responders and health care workers during the COVID-19 global pandemic. The app is available through the App Store/Google Play Store in the United States, free of charge to first responders, health care workers and their organizations.”

Chapelboro: UNC Not Requiring COVID-19 Testing Upon Students’ Return, Citing ‘False Sense of Security’

Chapelboro: UNC Not Requiring COVID-19 Testing Upon Students’ Return, Citing ‘False Sense of Security’. “In the first weekly update on the implementation of the Carolina Roadmap for Fall 2020, Provost Bob Blouin shared details on how the campus community can be tested for the coronavirus, as well as new required public health guidelines. In Thursday’s update and a message to students and faculty the previous week, university leadership said it will not be testing every member of the community upon their return to campus. Citing advice from health experts and the Centers for Disease Control, the update said widespread, asymptomatic testing for COVID-19 may lead to ‘a false sense of security’ at the university.”

UNC University Libraries: Half-Million Dollar Grant Will Extend Operations of North Carolina Digital Heritage Center

UNC University Libraries: Half-Million Dollar Grant Will Extend Operations of North Carolina Digital Heritage Center. “The North Carolina Digital Heritage Center (NCDHC) at the University Libraries has received a $525,573 grant to extend its operations. The award is from the State Library of North Carolina with funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services…. The grant will allow the center to continue to support its existing partners and to reach out to new partners to share their collections online.”

University of North Carolina: New Student-curated Online Exhibition Looks at Women’s Experiences at Carolina

University of North Carolina: New Student-curated Online Exhibition Looks at Women’s Experiences at Carolina. “‘Climbing the Hill: Women in the History of UNC’ focuses on women’s experiences at Carolina, covering a range of intersectional topics, including sexuality, race and age. The exhibition’s timeline begins before the admittance of the first female student, Mary McRae, in 1897, with artifacts including a dance card that men used to record their dance partners’ names when attending balls. Not only does the exhibition encompass the lives of women who lived on the Carolina campus, but it also looks at faculty, staff and the surrounding community. An example of this scope is a selection of books published by a 1970s and 1980s Carrboro-based children’s literature publishing company called Lollipop Power, Inc.”

University of North Carolina Libraries: Scholarly publishing at the tipping point

University of North Carolina Libraries: Scholarly publishing at the tipping point. “Last year, the University Libraries paid Elsevier, a Dutch company, $2.49 million for its package. This year the cost was $2.6 million – a 4.5% increase for the exact same package. The Library is in negotiations with several publishers including Elsevier, the world’s largest publisher of scientific information. Nothing has been decided; talks could continue into early 2020.”

UNC Libraries: Library to Debut Open Access Pilot with SAGE Publishing

UNC Libraries: Library to Debut Open Access Pilot with SAGE Publishing. “The University Libraries and SAGE Publishing will enter into a pilot agreement enabling researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to publish open access articles in SAGE journals at no cost to the researcher. Under the agreement, part of the subscription fees that the Library will pay for SAGE content beginning in 2020 will cover the costs of open access publishing for a number of UNC-Chapel Hill authors in SAGE publications. This comes at no additional cost to the Library and will preserve access to all content that the Library currently licenses from SAGE.”

UNC Libraries: Ten Standouts to Celebrate the Southern Folklife Collection’s First Thirty Years

UNC Libraries: Ten Standouts to Celebrate the Southern Folklife Collection’s First Thirty Years. “Opened in 1989 and centered at first around the John Edwards Memorial Collection, the SFC has grown over three decades into the foremost collection of its kind. To celebrate this milestone, and in anticipation of another great decade ahead, here are Southern Folklife Collection curator Steve Weiss’s picks for ten amusing, intriguing and interesting collection highlights from the SFC’s first thirty years.”

University of North Carolina Libraries: How Carolina’s Archivists Preserve and Share the History of UNC’s Confederate Monument

University of North Carolina Libraries: How Carolina’s Archivists Preserve and Share the History of UNC’s Confederate Monument. “Protestors toppled the monument on August 20, 2018, and officials swiftly removed it. Five months later, Chancellor Carol Folt punctuated her resignation announcement with an order to dismantle and remove the statue’s remaining pedestal and plaques. The protracted conflict—with its protests, counter-protests, petitions, news cameras and rallies—has played out dramatically and very much in the public eye. Meanwhile, just a quad away, librarians and archivists at the Wilson Special Collections Library have taken on a different kind of monumental task: helping people make sense of the statue’s controversial past and the role that it continues to play on campus, even in its absence.”

Newswise: Website Rates Security of Internet-Connected Devices

Newswise: Website Rates Security of Internet-Connected Devices. “Consumer-grade internet of things (IoT) devices aren’t exactly known for having tight security practices. To save purchasers from finding that out the hard way, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have done security assessments of representative devices, awarding scores ranging from 28 (an F) up to 100.”

The Wilson Times: Burk Uzzle photo archive headed to UNC library

The Wilson Times: Burk Uzzle photo archive headed to UNC library. “In front of Uzzle’s lens were Robin Williams spontaneously ad-libbing, Bill Gates sitting on the top of a boardroom table, Ethel and Robert Kennedy attending the funeral of a slain president, friends releasing Janis Joplin’s ashes on a beach, Hugh Hefner sizing up three bunnies, thousands of young people tuning in at Woodstock and thousands of other historically notable subjects. A team of archivists from the Kohler Foundation and Barton College is currently cataloging some 2,800 prints and 75,000 negatives from the 81-year-old photographer’s collection to be gifted to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Wilson Library.” There are plans to digitize the collection.

UNC Library: Savoring Southern Apples at Wilson Library

UNC Library: Savoring Southern Apples at Wilson Library . “Students in Elizabeth Engelhardt’s senior seminar in Southern studies showcased their digital research projects on Southern apples on a big screen at the front of the room. Apple enthusiasts — growers, festival organizers, researchers, chefs, cidery and nursery owners — nibbled on treats as they gathered to mark the official acquisition of the ‘Creighton Lee Calhoun Papers on Southern Apples, 1970s-2010’ in the Southern Historical Collection. Ann Marie Thornton of James Creek Cidery organized the food donations, which included contributions from James Beard award-winning chef Andrea Reusing, owner of Lantern restaurant.”