Hyperallergic: Access Rare and Beautiful “Manuscripts of the Muslim World” via UPenn’s Digital Library

Hyperallergic: Access Rare and Beautiful “Manuscripts of the Muslim World” via UPenn’s Digital Library. “All materials on OPenn are in the public domain or released under Creative Commons licenses as Free Cultural Works. The MMW Project characterizes these materials as ‘mostly unresearched,’ perhaps encouraging a curious army of sequestered armchair historians to dig into this wealth more than 500 manuscripts and 827 paintings from the Islamicate world broadly construed.”

University of Pennsylvania Almanac: Penn Vet Launches COVID-19 Canine Scent Detection Study

University of Pennsylvania Almanac: Penn Vet Launches COVID-19 Canine Scent Detection Study. “A pilot training program using scent detection dogs to discriminate between samples from COVID-19 positive and COVID-19 negative patients is the focus of a new research initiative at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet).”

Penn Today: ‘May the force be with you’ and other fan fiction favorites

Penn Today: ‘May the force be with you’ and other fan fiction favorites. “As a new Star Wars movie hits the multiplex, Penn researchers are launching a new computer-based tool to better understand fiction written by fans based on that blockbuster series and several other famous film franchises.”

The Daily Pennsylvanian: Two Penn professors and a Penn librarian given prestigious NEH grants

The Daily Pennsylvanian: Two Penn professors and a Penn librarian given prestigious NEH grants. “[David] McKnight was awarded $45,266 to fund a one-week conference for editors, archivists, and technologists to discuss digitalizing the manuscripts of British writer and suffragist May Sinclair. His project, ‘The Papers of British Writer and Suffragist May Sinclair (1863-1964): Creating a Digital Archive of her Manuscripts,’ will then create a full-text searchable online database of Sinclair’s manuscripts, which are the property of Penn’s library.”

Brevity is the Soul of Twitter: 280-Character Limit Makes Twitter More Civil (University of Pennsylvania)

University of Pennsylvania: Brevity is the Soul of Twitter: 280-Character Limit Makes Twitter More Civil. “You’ve probably heard it said before: Twitter is a cesspool. A platform once populated with harmless messages about one’s favorite TV shows or happenings about town, Twitter so often devolves into a hotbed of harassment, bullying, and metaphorical yelling. Many users thought doubling the platform’s character limit from 140 characters to 280, as Twitter did in November of 2017, could only make matters worse. But a new study from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania found the opposite.”

Science Daily: Social media use increases depression and loneliness, study finds

Science Daily: Social media use increases depression and loneliness, study finds . “Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram may not be great for personal well-being. The first experimental study examining use of multiple platforms shows a causal link between time spent on these social media and increased depression and loneliness.”

Meet the Manuscript Collective: a group of undergrads who explore Penn’s collection of rare texts (The Daily Pennsylvanian)

The Daily Pennsylvanian: Meet the Manuscript Collective: a group of undergrads who explore Penn’s collection of rare texts. “Personal letters from the hands of George Washington and Benjamin Franklin. Pages from Isaac Newton’s notebook. A copy of the King James Bible from 1613. Manuscripts of Byron’s poetry — complete with a bit of his hair. For a certain group of dedicated undergraduate students at The University of Pennsylvania, documents like these are readily accessible during their club meetings on the top floor of Van Pelt Library.”

Penn Today: Linguistic red flags from Facebook posts can predict future depression diagnoses

Penn Today: Linguistic red flags from Facebook posts can predict future depression diagnoses. “In any given year, depression affects more than 6 percent of the adult population in the United States—some 16 million people—but fewer than half receive the treatment they need. What if an algorithm could scan social media and point to linguistic red flags of the disease before a formal medical diagnosis had been made? New research from the University of Pennsylvania and Stony Brook University published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows this is now more plausible than ever.”

Penn Today: Penn brings Philadelphia’s rare manuscripts to the world

Penn Today: Penn brings Philadelphia’s rare manuscripts to the world. “‘If medieval manuscripts—which are historical documents, marks of lives well spent, and also consummate works of art—are going to reach their full potential in the 21st century, then they have to reach new audiences,’ says William Noel, director of Penn’s Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts. The collaborative three-year project, Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis, or BiblioPhilly for short, will digitize 475 European medieval and early modern manuscripts, and additional individual pages from the collections of 15 universities and other Philadelphia-area institutions. The high-resolution images and accompanying analyses will be made available to the public, free of charge, on Penn Libraries’ OPenn database.”

University of Pennsylvania: Prospecting Playbills

University of Pennsylvania: Prospecting Playbills. “A 1790 playbill advertising two comedies performed in the English town of Hull, The Belle’s Strategem and Harlequin Foundling, has 40 lines of text to describe the performance, including: “To conclude with a DANCE of FAIRIES in THE TEMPLE OF LIBERTY.” Playbills for 18th- and 19th-century dramatic performances such as this one are not only engaging, but filled with valuable information for researchers. How to capture and catalogue all of those varied, and often quirky, details for meaningful analysis? Neither a method nor a database exists. Until now.” That’s a heck of an opening for this article, but I’d love to learn the differences between this project and the British Library’s Playbill project, which was announced last September. Not that I think there should be only one or anything like that, I just want to know how this one is so different.

University of Pennsylvania: New Open-access Data Resource Aims to Bolster Collaboration in Global Infectious Disease Research

University of Pennsylvania: New Open-access Data Resource Aims to Bolster Collaboration in Global Infectious Disease Research. “A single epidemiological study—tracking the acquisition of functional resistance to malaria, or the relationship of diarrheal disease to developmental outcomes—may involve tens of thousands of clinical observations on thousands of participants from multiple countries. To overcome these hurdles, an international team of researchers has launched the Clinical Epidemiology Database, an open-access online resource enabling investigators to maximize the utility and reach of their data and to make optimal use of information released by others.”

Daily Pennsylvanian: Penn Libraries has received grants to digitize major cultural collections

Daily Pennsylvanian: Penn Libraries has received grants to digitize major cultural collections . “Penn Libraries received a grant to preserve Muslim manuscripts and make them more accessible to the students, scholars, and the public. Penn will collaborate with Columbia University and the Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation in the next three years to digitize Arabic, Persian, and Turkish texts through a full-time cataloger.”

Penn News: What Can Twitter Reveal About People With ADHD?

Penn News: What Can Twitter Reveal About People With ADHD? Penn Researchers Provide Answers. “What can Twitter reveal about people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD? Quite a bit about what life is like for someone with the condition, according to findings published by University of Pennsylvania researchers Sharath Chandra Guntuku and Lyle Ungar in the Journal of Attention Disorders. Twitter data might also provide clues to help facilitate more effective treatments.”

Phys.org: Penn interactive map shows community traits built from more than 37 billion tweets

Phys.org: Penn interactive map shows community traits built from more than 37 billion tweets. “It’s no secret that communities across the United States differ greatly. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania’s World Well-Being Project sought a simple way to capture, explore and share such differences on a large scale. Their end goal: to provide individuals with valuable insights about where they live and offer comparisons to other communities. The result is the Well-Being Map, an interactive, freely available tool based on the statistical language analysis of more than 37 billion publicly shared, geo-tagged tweets and on regional demographic data.”

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Psychologists Tap Big Data, Twitter to Analyze Accuracy of Stereotypes

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Psychologists Tap Big Data, Twitter to Analyze Accuracy of Stereotypes. “What’s in a tweet? People draw conclusions about us, from our gender to education level, based on the words we use on social media. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, along with colleagues from the Technical University of Darmstadt and the University of Melbourne, have now analyzed the accuracy of those inferences. Their work revealed that, though stereotypes and the truth often aligned, with people making accurate assumptions more than two-thirds of the time, inaccurate characterizations still showed up.”