University of Vermont: University of Vermont Launches National Center for Community News

University of Vermont: University of Vermont Launches National Center for Community News. “The new Center for Community News is supported by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and UVM College of Arts & Sciences (CAS) donors. The $400,000 initiative builds on the successful Community News model in Vermont, which brings students together with professional editors to provide news reporting at no cost to local news outlets.”

Vermont Public Radio: The ACLU wants Vermonters to get to know their elected prosecutors

Vermont Public Radio: The ACLU wants Vermonters to get to know their elected prosecutors. “The ACLU of Vermont is launching an online database to inform voters about their candidates for upcoming state’s attorney elections. The website features detailed profiles on every county’s current incumbent. Each profile includes publicly-available written policies, contact information, and links to learn more.”

Vermont Law School: New Legal Resource Assists Farmers And Food Producers With Food Safety Compliance

Vermont Law School: New Legal Resource Assists Farmers And Food Producers With Food Safety Compliance. “Today Vermont Law School’s Center for Agriculture and Food Systems (CAFS) and University of Vermont Extension’s Northeast Center to Advance Food Safety (NECAFS) announced the launch of a free legal resource for farmers and food producers….the new website features fact sheets that answer pressing legal questions about food safety compliance.”

University of Vermont: In Disasters, Twitter Influencers Get Out-Tweeted

University of Vermont: In Disasters, Twitter Influencers Get Out-Tweeted. “When it comes to sharing emergency information during natural disasters, new University of Vermont research shows how timing is everything. The new study on Twitter use during hurricanes, floods and tornadoes offers potentially life-saving data about how information is disseminated in emergency situations, and by whom. The research is the first to look at social media patterns across different disaster types, focusing on five of the decade’s costliest U.S. emergencies.”