University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world. “The Interactiveoceans website takes you deep into the ocean, offering data on light, temperature and a whole host of other variables collected by more than 140 instruments throughout the water column and along the seafloor. It offers recordings of mammal vocalizations and video from underwater hot springs where never-before-seen organisms live. It introduces the technology and the instruments being used on the Regional Cabled Array, with data streaming to shore through fiber optic cables at the speed of broadband Internet.”

University of Washington: More than 100 years of Arctic sea ice volume reconstructed with help from historic ships’ logbooks

University of Washington: More than 100 years of Arctic sea ice volume reconstructed with help from historic ships’ logbooks. “Our knowledge of the dwindling sea ice coverage in the Arctic Ocean comes mostly through satellites, which since 1979 have imaged the sea ice from above. The University of Washington’s Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean and Modeling System, or PIOMAS, is a leading tool for gauging the thickness of that ice. Until now that system has gone back only as far as 1979. A new paper now extends the estimate of Arctic sea ice volume back more than a century, to 1901. To do so it used both modern-day computer simulations and historic observations, some written by hand in the early 1900s aboard precursors to today’s U.S. Coast Guard ships.

Behind the magic: Making moving photos a reality (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: Behind the magic: Making moving photos a reality. “People moving in and out of photographs used to be reserved for the world of Harry Potter. But now computer scientists at the University of Washington have brought that magic to real life. Their algorithm, Photo Wake-Up, can take a person from a 2D photo or a work of art and make them run, walk or jump out of the frame.”

University of Washington: Suicidal thoughts? Therapy-oriented website might help

University of Washington: Suicidal thoughts? Therapy-oriented website might help. “Researchers asked more than 3,000 website visitors how they felt before they got to the website compared with after a few minutes after arriving. Nearly one-third were significantly less suicidal, and the intensity of their negative emotions had also decreased. Findings were published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, an open-access publication.” This site apparently launched in 2014, but it’s new to me.

Fake faces: UWs ‘Calling BS’ duo opens new website asking ‘Which face is real?’ (University of Washington)

University of Washington: Fake faces: UWs ‘Calling BS’ duo opens new website asking ‘Which face is real?’. “Which of these two realistic renderings of faces is real, and which is a computer-generated fake? Biology professor Carl Bergstrom and Information School professor Jevin West — creators of the ‘Calling BS’ class and site — now have a website to help you better discern between fake and real images online.” I got several right in a row before I got suspicious and deliberately guessed wrong, at which point I was noted to have given the incorrect answer. Aside from the obvious glitches you might see, watch ears, hair, and teeth to detect AI-generated fakes.

University of Washington: Data error exposes patient information

University of Washington Medicine: Data error exposes patient information. “On Dec. 26, 2018, UW Medicine became aware of a vulnerability on a website server that made protected internal files available and visible by search on the internet on Dec. 4, 2018. The files contained protected health information (PHI) about reporting that UW Medicine is legally required to track, such as reporting to various regulatory bodies, in compliance with Washington state reporting requirements…. The files contained patients’ names, medical record numbers, and a description and purpose of the information. The files did not contain any medical records, patient financial information or Social Security numbers.”

Project Sidewalk: A Web-based Crowdsourcing Tool for Collecting Sidewalk Accessibility Data at Scale (University of Washington)

University of Washington (also a PDF file): Project Sidewalk: A Web-based Crowdsourcing Tool for Collecting Sidewalk Accessibility Data at Scale. “We introduce Project Sidewalk, a new web-based tool that enables online crowd workers to remotely label pedestrian related accessibility problems by virtually walking through city streets in Google Street View. To train, engage, and sustain users, we apply basic game design principles such as interactive onboarding, mission-based tasks, and progress dashboards. In an 18-month deployment study, 797 online users contributed 205,385 labels and audited 2,941 miles of Washington DC streets. “