Geek Wire: Feel like visiting ‘just one friend’ during COVID-19 lockdown? UW illustrates damage it could cause

Geek Wire: Feel like visiting ‘just one friend’ during COVID-19 lockdown? UW illustrates damage it could cause. “That desire you have to get together with just one friend, and break the social distancing barrier which has kept us all apart during the coronavirus outbreak, may seem like a simple and harmless act. But a new website set up by University of Washington researchers illustrates how little it would take to undo the benefits of keeping our distance.”

University of Washington: New online course explores COVID-19 pandemic

University of Washington: New online course explores COVID-19 pandemic. “A new course from the Department of Global Health at the University of Washington Schools of Public Health and Medicine will explore the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Course topics range from coronavirus testing and COVID-19 vaccine development to the pandemic’s social and economic implications. The seminar series will run from April 13 through May 18, and include lectures from the UW’s top experts on infectious diseases and pandemic preparedness. The course is open to UW graduate and professional students for one credit and seminars will be available for the public via a video recording.”

24/7 Sports: Digital football archive a labor of love for Washington SID

24/7 Sports: Digital football archive a labor of love for Washington SID. “For those of us who are considered ‘non-essential’ workers but don’t work from home and have been ordered to shelter in place, this can be a time to catch up on all sorts of things. Clean the house, organize your papers, catch up on correspondence, cross books off your ‘must-read’ list. For Washington Assistant Athletic Director for Athletic Communications Jeff Bechthold (or Sports Information Director (SID), for short), he doesn’t mind sprinkling in a little bit of work during his forced hiatus. That’s because he’s taken on the task of updating and digitizing Washington’s vast football archive.”

University of Washington: How people investigate — or don’t — fake news on Twitter and Facebook

University of Washington: How people investigate — or don’t — fake news on Twitter and Facebook. “Researchers at the University of Washington wanted to know how people investigated potentially suspicious posts on their own feeds. The team watched 25 participants scroll through their Facebook or Twitter feeds while, unbeknownst to them, a Google Chrome extension randomly added debunked content on top of some of the real posts.”

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world. “The Interactiveoceans website takes you deep into the ocean, offering data on light, temperature and a whole host of other variables collected by more than 140 instruments throughout the water column and along the seafloor. It offers recordings of mammal vocalizations and video from underwater hot springs where never-before-seen organisms live. It introduces the technology and the instruments being used on the Regional Cabled Array, with data streaming to shore through fiber optic cables at the speed of broadband Internet.”

University of Washington: More than 100 years of Arctic sea ice volume reconstructed with help from historic ships’ logbooks

University of Washington: More than 100 years of Arctic sea ice volume reconstructed with help from historic ships’ logbooks. “Our knowledge of the dwindling sea ice coverage in the Arctic Ocean comes mostly through satellites, which since 1979 have imaged the sea ice from above. The University of Washington’s Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean and Modeling System, or PIOMAS, is a leading tool for gauging the thickness of that ice. Until now that system has gone back only as far as 1979. A new paper now extends the estimate of Arctic sea ice volume back more than a century, to 1901. To do so it used both modern-day computer simulations and historic observations, some written by hand in the early 1900s aboard precursors to today’s U.S. Coast Guard ships.

Behind the magic: Making moving photos a reality (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: Behind the magic: Making moving photos a reality. “People moving in and out of photographs used to be reserved for the world of Harry Potter. But now computer scientists at the University of Washington have brought that magic to real life. Their algorithm, Photo Wake-Up, can take a person from a 2D photo or a work of art and make them run, walk or jump out of the frame.”