The Star (Malaysia): Singapore using ‘virtual twins’ of land and sea to monitor activities and plan projects

The Star (Malaysia): Singapore using ‘virtual twins’ of land and sea to monitor activities and plan projects. “GeoSpace-Sea stores and presents data from 11 government agencies, including national water agency PUB and the Housing Board. For example, if the National Parks Board (NParks) wants to study marine biodiversity, it can use the virtual twin to access marine life data, or the distribution of corals and sea grass. GeoSpace-Sea allows users to view and analyse the seabed with three-dimensional images as well.”

Newswise: NUS researchers develop AI-powered tool to map sustainable roofs globally

Newswise: NUS researchers develop AI-powered tool to map sustainable roofs globally. “Dr Filip Biljecki, Presidential Young Professor from the Department of Architecture at the National University of Singapore (NUS) School of Design and Environment, and NUS Master of Architecture graduate Mr Abraham Noah Wu developed an automated tool that uses satellite images to track how rooftops around the world adopt solar panels and/or vegetation. Known as Roofpedia, it uses a fully convolutional neural network (deep learning) which allows researchers and policymakers to study how cities worldwide are greening their rooftops and using them for photovoltaic installations.”

Cities after COVID: Resiliency is about embracing the crisis as part of a new brand story (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Cities after COVID: Resiliency is about embracing the crisis as part of a new brand story. “Cities as we know them are under attack thanks to COVID-19. Their growth, sustainability and ability to attract investment, tourism and talent are extremely vulnerable during times of crisis. In the last hundred years, cities have seen an increase in crises, pandemics and economic pressures—but not all are hit equally.”

SF Gate: Here’s what we know about Willow Village, the community Facebook is building in the Bay Area

SF Gate: Here’s what we know about Willow Village, the community Facebook is building in the Bay Area. “It’s true that Willow Village — planned to cover 1.6 million square feet at the current site of an industrial warehouse complex — is smaller than your average city, and will not be incorporated, but the site will include a supermarket, a pharmacy, cafes, a 193-room hotel and a “town square.” Surrounding the site will be 1.25 million square-feet of new Facebook office space and 1,729 apartments.”

Next City: LEARN-ing to Sustain a City’s Culture and Character

Next City: LEARN-ing to Sustain a City’s Culture and Character. “The following is an adapted excerpt of ‘Sustaining a City’s Culture and Character,’ by Charles R. Wolfe with Tigran Haas, published by Rowman & Littlefield. In it, the authors lay out a comprehensive method (heavily dependent on context) for assessing how and why certain places are considered successful, authentic, or unique. As the world, and cities, respond to and grapple with climate change threats, public health crises, and powerful calls for social justice, understanding the through lines that connect a city to its past, to its essence, will be more important than ever.”

EurekAlert: Stanford researchers develop new software for designing sustainable cities

EurekAlert: Stanford researchers develop new software for designing sustainable cities. “New technology could help cities around the world improve people’s lives while saving billions of dollars. The free, open-source software developed by the Stanford Natural Capital Project creates maps to visualize the links between nature and human wellbeing. City planners and developers can use the software to visualize where investments in nature, such as parks and marshlands, can maximize benefits to people, like protection from flooding and improved health.”

MIT Press News: The MIT Press launches new open access collection of 34 classic architecture and urban studies titles

MIT Press News: The MIT Press launches new open access collection of 34 classic architecture and urban studies titles . “Today, the MIT Press launched MIT Press Open Architecture and Urban Studies, a robust digital collection of classic and previously out-of-print architecture and urban studies books, on their digital book platform MIT Press Direct. The collection was funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation as part of the Humanities Open Book Program, which they co-sponsored with the National Endowment for the Humanities.”

The Conversation: Why COVID-19 won’t kill cities

The Conversation: Why COVID-19 won’t kill cities. “Restaurants, small businesses and even big brand-name retail chains are closing in record numbers. Mass transit systems, like New York City’s, are warning of severe cuts in service if they don’t get aid soon as state and local tax revenue plunges. Many have fled to rural or suburban areas. And the situation appears likely to only worsen as America endures a ‘dark winter’ with no guarantee of more aid from Congress. Despite these challenges, two scholars who study cities explain why they think urban areas will endure – even if they don’t get the aid from Congress that now seems more likely.”

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: New Machine Learning Tool Tracks Urban Traffic Congestion

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: New Machine Learning Tool Tracks Urban Traffic Congestion. “Currently, publicly available traffic information at the street level is sparse and incomplete. Traffic engineers generally have relied on isolated traffic counts, collision statistics and speed data to determine roadway conditions. The new tool uses traffic datasets collected from UBER drivers and other publicly available traffic sensor data to map street-level traffic flow over time. It creates a big picture of city traffic using machine learning tools and the computing resources available at a national laboratory.”

WBEZ: COVID-19 Is Changing The Way Some Planners Think About How To Design And Develop Cities

WBEZ: COVID-19 Is Changing The Way Some Planners Think About How To Design And Develop Cities. “Cities around the world want to reimagine how businesses rebound amid economic devastation and find a way for society to go car-free. Urbanism in the time of coronavirus is a hot Twitter topic among urbanists. For others, the elite nature of who cities serve could change with the pandemic, opening up conversations around equity, say some experts.”

Intelligent Transport: ITDP reveals new tools to improve transit inclusivity and city walkability

Intelligent Transport: ITDP reveals new tools to improve transit inclusivity and city walkability. “The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) has revealed Pedestrians First – a guide and set of online tools to aid urban planners and city officials in assessing inclusivity of their cities’ transit systems as well as the walkability of their neighbourhoods and streets. The guide includes walkability data for nearly 1,000 metropolitan areas around the world, which users can explore in an interactive map. ITDP says this is the first-ever worldwide analysis to measure walkability in cities globally.”

MIT Technology Review: AI planners in Minecraft could help machines design better cities

MIT Technology Review: AI planners in Minecraft could help machines design better cities. “The annual Generative Design in Minecraft (GDMC) competition asks participants to build an artificial intelligence that can generate realistic towns or villages in previously unseen locations. The contest is just for fun, for now, but the techniques explored by the various AI competitors are precursors of ones that real-world city planners could use.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Digitization of materials documenting the beginning of Peachtree City, Georgia are now available freely online

Digital Library of Georgia: Digitization of materials documenting the beginning of Peachtree City, Georgia are now available freely online. “New online records that describe the history of Peachtree City, Georgia, one of the country’s most successful post-World War II ‘new towns,’ are now available for researchers in the Digital Library of Georgia.”

Slate: Will COVID Push People Out of Cities for Good?

Slate: Will COVID Push People Out of Cities for Good?. “Since the coronavirus shutdowns began in March, everyone’s been wondering the same thing: Are city residents really leaving? And if so, are they ever coming back? Eager journalists have rushed to quote suburban real estate brokers—which is like asking Oscar Mayer if people like hot dogs. Local TV is following families out to greener pastures, and Instagram shows a never-ending stream of vacations. To find out how many people have really left, I consulted some experts on cities and suburbs: Emily Badger of the New York Times, Natalie Moore of WBEZ Chicago, and Amanda Kolson Hurley of Bloomberg Businessweek.”

The Next Web: Coronavirus has changed travel in European cities for good — here’s how

The Next Web: Coronavirus has changed travel in European cities for good — here’s how . “At a recent Cities Today Institute roundtable, cities across Europe told a consistent story – public transport ridership is down between 60 and 90 percent on pre-coronavirus levels and capacity is reduced due to social distancing, while private car usage is beginning to climb once again. With revenues from media, parking and other taxes also slashed, this is adding up to a perfect storm of looming congestion and decimated budgets.”