The College of New Jersey: Civil engineering students and their professor apply big data to understand New Jersey’s bumper-to-bumper lifestyle.

The College of New Jersey: Civil engineering students and their professor apply big data to understand New Jersey’s bumper-to-bumper lifestyle.. “On a 100-degree day in late July, civil engineering professor Tom Brennan and three students in his research lab made it snow. No, indoor precipitation was not in the forecast: the snow storm was a computer simulation of an actual one that blew in pretty much out of nowhere on the afternoon of November 15, 2018, creating traffic nightmares throughout New Jersey.”

Indiana University: First-of-its-kind online tool helps Indiana communities address climate change vulnerabilities

Indiana University: First-of-its-kind online tool helps Indiana communities address climate change vulnerabilities. “Indiana University’s Environmental Resilience Institute, part of the Prepared for Environmental Change Grand Challenge initiative, has launched the Hoosier Resilience Index, a first-of-its-kind online tool to help local governments and Indiana residents understand how their communities are vulnerable to climate change and what they can do to respond.”

Gaston Gazette: Gastonia counting its trees

Gaston Gazette: Gastonia counting its trees. “The last time Gastonia completed a tree inventory was 15 years ago. Then, the count showed about 11,000 trees. The inventory, however, was done on paper — something Gastonia found hard to maintain. This time around, the city anticipates between 12,000 and 13,000 trees, and it’s making a digital archive.”

Wired: LA’s Plan to Reboot Its Bus System—Using Cell Phone Data

Wired: LA’s Plan to Reboot Its Bus System—Using Cell Phone Data. “Transportation, meanwhile, emits nearly a third of the nation’s climate-change-causing greenhouse gases. Getting people out of cars and into buses and trains is key to knocking that number down. Trains are great, and Los Angeles’ light rail network—84 miles spreading across the Southland—is the largest in the country. But trains are expensive, and they can’t get everywhere. That’s where buses can come in. Yet at the precise moment when it’s most urgent that cities get people out of their cars, bus systems are struggling. So LA is talking about scrapping the system and starting over, the first radical revamp since rail came back to town. To figure out how to do it right, all the city’s transit planners need is location data from about 5 million cell phones.”

Seattle Times: New tool helps you track all kinds of transit through the Seattle region, from buses and trains to ferries

Seattle Times: New tool helps you track all kinds of transit through the Seattle region, from buses and trains to ferries. “Have you ever run to a bus stop just in time for its scheduled arrival only to end up waiting for the bus to show up University of Washington junior Kona Farry has, so he built a website, unveiled late last month, that lets transit users track the whereabouts of all the buses, ferries, streetcars and light-rail trains in service in the Seattle region.”

Engadget: Open Curbs database could make it easier to catch an Uber

Engadget: Open Curbs database could make it easier to catch an Uber. “Curb data can be intensely useful to city planners and transportation companies alike, but it’s usually fenced off. What if everyone had access to it? They will now. Alphabet spinoff Coord has launched Open Curbs, a public repository for curb info like parking signs, fire hydrants and other vital details. The information could help cities identify safe places for delivery and ride hailing stops, not to mention aid in urban planning as the transportation grid evolves.”

Fort Worth Texas: How cities (like Fort Worth) can use Google Street View to measure change

Fort Worth Texas: How cities (like Fort Worth) can use Google Street View to measure change. “A new effort to track street-level changes in cities is using a widely available tool to gather information: Google Street View. Taking the time to view online maps and click on specific areas or blocks to trigger 360-degree views — and then compare those views to snapshots taken in previous years — can teach a lot about year-over-year changes to a street, without requiring the user to actually visit in person. This effort was showcased at a SXSW 2019 session in Austin featuring the coauthor of a major study on the subject, as well as Fort Worth City Councilmember Ann Zadeh, who represents District 9. She is putting these ideas into action at the local level.”