Library of Congress: Papers of President James Garfield Now Online

Library of Congress: Papers of President James Garfield Now Online. “The papers of President James A. Garfield, who was assassinated in the first year of his short presidency, have been digitized and are now available online for the first time from the Library of Congress. The Garfield collection includes approximately 80,000 items, mostly dating from 1850 to 1881.”

Library of Congress: The Experimental Congress.gov Browser Extension Can Now Search the Compilation of Presidential Documents

Library of Congress: The Experimental Congress.gov Browser Extension Can Now Search the Compilation of Presidential Documents. “This latest update to the experimental Google Chrome Congress.gov browser extension that is hosted by LC Labs adds the ability to highlight text on a page and search for it in the Compilation of Presidential Documents on govinfo. The compilation includes executive orders and executive proclamations issued after 1992.”

Federal Depository Library Program: GPO Digitizes Public Papers of the Presidents

Federal Depository Library Program: GPO Digitizes Public Papers of the Presidents. “The U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO) and the National Archives’ Office of the Federal Register (OFR) have digitized volumes of The Public Papers of the Presidents for Presidents Herbert Hoover (1929) through George H.W. Bush (1990), with the exception of the Franklin D. Roosevelt presidency. The papers of President Franklin Roosevelt were published privately before the commencement of the official Public Papers series. Each volume of The Public Papers of the Presidents is comprised of a forward by the President, public writings, addresses, remarks, and photographs. This digitization effort joined the already digital version of Public Papers for Presidents George H. W. Bush (1991−1992), William J. Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack H. Obama.”

EurekAlert: Trump’s tweets reveal hidden unity between Democrats, Republicans

EurekAlert: Trump’s tweets reveal hidden unity between Democrats, Republicans. “Democrats and Republicans may stand on opposite ends of the political spectrum, but when it comes to President Donald Trump’s tweets, they have more in common than meets the eye. Both parties disapprove of Trump’s tweets that insult people or contain false information, and they like language that supports the military or shares condolences, regardless of their attitudes toward the president, according to a new University at Buffalo study published this month in the Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Conference on Web and Social Media.”

Brookings: With Obama’s official papers living online, what might be lost?

Brookings: With Obama’s official papers living online, what might be lost?. “The announcement that President Barack Obama’s official papers will be digitized is a break from tradition. It is clearly a nod to contemporary life, and some might view it as a welcome change from driving for miles to sift through paper documents in presidential libraries. But the decision to go digital rather than place the paper records in a research library has created a stir in the community of people who make a living doing research in presidential libraries. With presidential libraries already facing challenges, a transition to online-only resources could come at the cost of one of their greatest assets: the knowledge and commitment of the archivists, whose expertise in both the presidency and the organization of the collection is an immense resource for researchers.”

UVA Today: Miller Center Announces Barack Obama Oral History Project

UVA Today: Miller Center Announces Barack Obama Oral History Project. “The University of Virginia’s Miller Center of Public Affairs, home to the nation’s longest-running nonpartisan presidential oral history program, announced today that it has begun work on its next major project: a comprehensive oral history of the Barack Obama administration.”

Nieman Lab: Ready to read the report?!? Despite decades of digital decay, The Washington Post’s 1998 copy of the Starr Report is still alive

Nieman Lab: Ready to read the report?!? Despite decades of digital decay, The Washington Post’s 1998 copy of the Starr Report is still alive. “As Attorney General William Barr fielded reporters at a presser (hours before releasing the actual report), the same ole Post link from 1998 made the rounds on Twitter. The only other complete file of it I could find was from the Government Publishing Office, available in plain text and PDF.”