POGO: Over 75 Organizations Urge Supreme Court to Make Live Audio Streaming Permanent and Accessible

POGO: Over 75 Organizations Urge Supreme Court to Make Live Audio Streaming Permanent and Accessible. “Providing live audio access to cases during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has convincingly demonstrated the public’s appetite to observe the operations of the Court. It has also shown that the Court can balance increased public access with the integrity of its proceedings. Equitable access to the Court as an institution is imperative for all Americans.”

NBC News: Supreme Court rejects challenge to Indiana University’s vaccination requirement

NBC News: Supreme Court rejects challenge to Indiana University’s vaccination requirement. “The Supreme Court refused Thursday to block Indiana University’s requirement that students be vaccinated against Covid-19 to attend classes in the fall semester. It was the first legal test of a Covid vaccination mandate to come before the justices. A challenge to the policy was directed to Amy Coney Barrett, the justice in charge of that region of the country, who denied it. There were no noted dissents from other justices.”

News@Northeastern: Supreme Court Ruling Clears Path For Researchers, Journalists Who Test Facebook And Other Platforms For Discrimination

News@Northeastern: Supreme Court Ruling Clears Path For Researchers, Journalists Who Test Facebook And Other Platforms For Discrimination. “The case, Van Buren v. United States, deals with a former police officer who agreed to search digital license plate records outside his official duties as an officer, in exchange for cash. It’s not the broad strokes of the incident, but the implication of the court ruling, that clears the way for researchers to continue the important work of probing websites and online platforms for evidence of bias and discrimination.”

BBC: US teen’s Snapchat rant reaches Supreme Court in free speech case

BBC: US teen’s Snapchat rant reaches Supreme Court in free speech case. “A teenager’s rant that led to her getting kicked off her cheerleading team has reached the US Supreme Court. Brandi Levy sent a profanity-laden post to her friends on Snapchat in 2017, venting her frustrations with cheerleading and her school. But when coaches at the Pennsylvania school discovered the post, she was barred from the squad for a year.”

CNBC: Supreme Court rules in Google’s favor in copyright dispute with Oracle over Android software

CNBC: Supreme Court rules in Google’s favor in copyright dispute with Oracle over Android software. “The Supreme Court on Monday sided with Google against Oracle in a long-running copyright dispute over the software used in Android, the mobile operating system. The court’s decision was 6-2. Justice Amy Coney Barrett, who was not yet confirmed by the Senate when the case was argued in October, did not participate in the case.”

SCOTUS Blog: Court says Facebook did not violate anti-spam law when it sent unwanted text messages

SCOTUS Blog: Court says Facebook did not violate anti-spam law when it sent unwanted text messages. “Facebook did not violate a federal telemarketing law when it sent unsolicited text messages to people without their consent, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled on Thursday. In an opinion by Justice Sonia Sotomayor, the court sided with Facebook’s interpretation of a key clause in the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, which restricts the use of devices known as ‘automatic telephone dialing systems.’”

SCOTUS Blog: Justices return to standing after Spokeo

SCOTUS Blog: Justices return to standing after Spokeo. “Nearly five years ago, the Supreme Court decided Spokeo v. Robins, the case of a Virginia man who alleged that an internet database company violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act when it published inaccurate information about him. The justices ruled that to have standing – that is, a legal right to sue – it is not enough to simply allege that a statute has been violated. Instead, a plaintiff must show an injury that is both concrete and particularized, even if it is not necessarily a tangible one. On Tuesday in TransUnion v. Ramirez, the justices will consider how these requirements apply to class actions.”

AP: Now vaccinated, justices gather privately at Supreme Court

AP: Now vaccinated, justices gather privately at Supreme Court. “The Supreme Court is returning to a little bit of normal following a year disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. Most of the justices met in person Friday for a regularly scheduled private conference, court spokesperson Kathy Arberg said. The justices have been holding conferences by phone since the court closed to the public in March of last year. Before Friday, the justices last met in person for a private conference on March 6, 2020.”

New York Times: Supreme Court Partly Backs Religious Challenge to California Virus Restrictions

New York Times: Supreme Court Partly Backs Religious Challenge to California Virus Restrictions. “The court ruled in cases brought by South Bay United Pentecostal Church in Chula Vista and Harvest Rock Church in Pasadena. The churches said restrictions imposed by Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, violated the Constitution’s protection of the free exercise of religion.”

Politico: Justices express qualms about sweeping computer crime law

Politico: Justices express qualms about sweeping computer crime law. “During arguments in a case involving a Georgia police officer convicted of violating the 1986 Computer Fraud and Abuse Act by accessing a license plate database, the justices pushed a Justice Department lawyer to explain how a ruling in the government’s favor wouldn’t open the door to prosecutions of innocuous behavior. Those could include browsing Instagram on a work computer or performing public-spirited security research to test a system for vulnerabilities.”