Slate: Roberts Upholds COVID-19 Restrictions on Churches, Scolds Kavanaugh

Slate: Roberts Upholds COVID-19 Restrictions on Churches, Scolds Kavanaugh. “Friday at midnight, the Supreme Court rejected a church’s challenge to California’s COVID-19 restrictions by a 5–4 vote, with Chief Justice John Roberts joining the liberals. In a pointed opinion, Roberts indicated that he will not join conservative judges’ escalating efforts to override public health measures in the name of religious freedom. Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s dissent, by contrast, falsely accused the state of religious discrimination in an extremely misleading opinion that omits the most important facts of the case. Roberts went out of his way to scold Kavanaugh’s dishonest vilification of the state.”

Courthouse News Service: Coronavirus Controls Bring Live Audio Finally to Supreme Court

Courthouse News Service: Coronavirus Controls Bring Live Audio Finally to Supreme Court. “In response to the coronavirus pandemic, the court had delayed two rounds of arguments set for the end of March and April, pushing off some of the most highly anticipated and politically consequential arguments of its term. In the meantime, the court has held remote conferences on Fridays and continued releasing opinions and orders lists while the justices and most court staff works remotely.”

PR Newswire: Sandra Day O’Connor Digital Library Launched (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Sandra Day O’Connor Digital Library Launched (PRESS RELEASE). “The Sandra Day O’Connor Institute today launched its comprehensive Digital Library which catalogs the life and work of Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, the first woman to serve on the United States Supreme Court. For the first time, Justice O’Connor’s body of work across her decades in public service is available in an easily accessible, searchable format.”

Mashable: This Supreme Court case could criminalize online immigration activism. Here’s why.

Mashable: This Supreme Court case could criminalize online immigration activism. Here’s why.. “The case, U.S. v. Sineneng-Smith, originates from a federal district court in California where a federal grand jury convicted immigration consultant Evelyn Sineneng-Smith for fraud after she told her undocumented clients they could maintain legal status under a program she knew had expired. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals did little to overturn that conviction. What it did overturn, however, was a separate conviction that found Sineneng-Smith guilty under a 1986 federal law that makes it a crime to ‘encourage’ and ‘induce’ known undocumented immigrants to reside in the U.S. And it did so on First Amendment grounds.”

‘OK Boomer’: From TikTok meme to the US Supreme Court (BBC)

BBC: ‘OK Boomer’: From TikTok meme to the US Supreme Court. “You might have seen it as a meme on Twitter or TikTok but now it has made its way to the US Supreme Court. The catchphrase ‘OK Boomer’ went viral last year as a tongue-in-cheek dig by young people at older generations. In the highest US court, it was heard as part of a case about age discrimination.”

ZDNet: Google garners support from tech industry in Supreme Court API copyright fight

ZDNet: Google garners support from tech industry in Supreme Court API copyright fight. “Submitting a joint ‘friend of the court’ brief on Monday — a legal document that offers information that has a bearing on the issues of a court case — Mozilla, Medium, Cloudera, Reddit, along with others, have pleaded for SCOTUS to reverse the Federal Court’s decision and allow for APIs to continue to be free from copyright, or at least be available for fair use.”

Ars Technica: Justices debate allowing state law to be “hidden behind a pay wall”

Ars Technica: Justices debate allowing state law to be “hidden behind a pay wall”. “The courts have long held that laws can’t be copyrighted. But if the state mixes the text of the law together with supporting information, things get trickier. In Monday oral arguments, the US Supreme Court wrestled with the copyright status of Georgia’s official legal code, which includes annotations written by LexisNexis.”