USPTO: USPTO launches platform to facilitate connections between patent holders and potential licensees in key technologies

USPTO: USPTO launches platform to facilitate connections between patent holders and potential licensees in key technologies. “The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) today unveiled a new web-based intellectual property (IP) marketplace platform, Patents 4 Partnerships, to provide the public with a user-friendly, searchable repository of patents and published patent applications related to the COVID-19 pandemic that are indicated as available for licensing.”

USPTO: USPTO launches the Expanding Innovation Hub, a new online platform to encourage greater participation in the patent system

USPTO: USPTO launches the Expanding Innovation Hub, a new online platform to encourage greater participation in the patent system. “Today, as part of Women’s History Month, the USPTO has officially launched the Expanding Innovation Hub (‘the Hub’), an online platform available on the USPTO website that provides resources for inventors and practitioners to encourage greater participation in the patent system.”

World Trademark Review: USPTO urged to halt applicant email requirement following revolt by trademark attorneys

World Trademark Review: USPTO urged to halt applicant email requirement following revolt by trademark attorneys. “The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is facing a backlash from users following an announcement that all trademark applicants and registrants will need to provide an email address that will be publicly viewable. With concerns around the privacy implications and a potential rise in scams, a group of attorneys have penned a letter to the registry urging a rethink.”

Torrent Freak: USPTO Questions if Artificial Intelligence Can Create or Infringe Copyrighted Works

Torrent Freak: USPTO Questions if Artificial Intelligence Can Create or Infringe Copyrighted Works. “There is no question that artificial intelligence is destined to replace some human work in the future. But can something that’s created by AI technology be copyrighted? And can AI creations infringe copyrights of others? These are questions the US Patent and Trademark Office would like to have answered by asking the public for input.”

Washington Post: Step aside Edison, Tesla and Bell. New measurement shows when U.S. inventors were most influential.

Washington Post: Step aside Edison, Tesla and Bell. New measurement shows when U.S. inventors were most influential.. “The U.S. patent office has stockpiled the text to more than 10 million patents. But that’s often all they have: an enormous amount of text. Many early patents lack any form of citation or industry specification, which researchers could use to understand the history of American invention. Now a team of economists has created a clever algorithm that processes that text — often the only consistent data we have for many of the country’s most famous inventions — to create a measure of the influential inventors and industries of the past 180 years.”

Google Blog: Coming together to create a prior art archive

Google Blog: Coming together to create a prior art archive. “A healthy patent system requires that patent applicants and examiners be able to find and access the best documentation of state-of-the-art technology. This documentation is often found in sources other than patents. Non-patent literature can be particularly hard to find and access in the software field, where it may take the form of user manuals, technical specifications, or product marketing materials. Without access to this information, patent offices may issue patents covering existing technology, or not recognize trivial extensions of published research, removing the public’s right to use it and bringing the reliability of patent rights into question. To address this problem, academia and industry have worked together to launch the Prior Art Archive, created through a collaboration between the MIT Media Lab, Cisco and the USPTO, and hosted by MIT. The Prior Art Archive is a new, open access system that allows anyone to upload those hard-to-find technical materials and make them easily searchable by everyone.”

USPTO director Michelle Lee has resigned without warning (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: USPTO director Michelle Lee has resigned without warning. “Director of the US Patent and Trademark Office Michelle Lee resigned today, without explanation. Lee, who has been director of the office since 2014, was a favored candidate by the tech sector, who thought she brought a balanced approach to patents. She is a former Google lawyer and was one of the first corporate lawyers to speak out about the problem of so-called ‘patent trolls.’ “