Rensselaer: Consumers Are Likely To Be Susceptible to Slick Graphic Design of Trading Platforms

Rensselaer: Consumers Are Likely To Be Susceptible to Slick Graphic Design of Trading Platforms. “Research conducted by Gaurav Jain, a behavioral economist and assistant professor at Rensselaer, and John Chen, an undergraduate student studying biology in Rensselaer’s accelerated B.S./M.D. program, explored how certain graphic designs on decentralized finance (defi) apps can target an investor’s inexperience to elicit decisions that are quick and uninformed, using an investor’s intuition rather than information.”

TechCrunch: The Web Foundation is taking on deceptive design

TechCrunch: The Web Foundation is taking on deceptive design. “The Web Foundation‘s Tech Policy Design Lab is working on an interesting-looking project to counter deceptive design — aka dark patterns* — with the goal of producing a portfolio of UX and UI prototypes which it hopes to persuade tech companies to adopt and policymakers to be inspired by as they fashion rules to make the online experience less exploitative of web users.”

The Guardian: Can you solve it? Are you smart enough to opt out of cookies?

The Guardian: Can you solve it? Are you smart enough to opt out of cookies?. “Today’s puzzles are taken from Terms & Conditions Apply, a free game in which you are bombarded with pop-ups and must get to the end without signing up to cookies, T&Cs, newsletters, or any other data-extraction device. The game is a send-up of the tricks used by websites to get you to things you don’t want to do, setting the player tasks including word challenges, logic puzzles, dexterity tests and optical illusions.”If you want a hair-pullingly frustrating game to show you the danger of dark patterns, look no further.

IEEE Spectrum: New Tool Strips Manipulative “Dark Patterns” From Mobile Apps

IEEE Spectrum: New Tool Strips Manipulative “Dark Patterns” From Mobile Apps. “The mobile apps we use every day are surprisingly manipulative. Subtle design tricks known as ‘dark patterns’ nudge us into doing what the app maker wants—be that buying products or continuing to scroll. But now, researchers are fighting back with a new tool that strips these unwanted features out of Android apps.”

Wired: How to Spot—and Avoid—Dark Patterns on the Web

Wired: How to Spot—and Avoid—Dark Patterns on the Web . “The term ‘dark patterns’ was first coined by UX specialist Harry Brignull to describe the ways in which software can subtly trick users into doing things they didn’t mean to do, or discouraging behavior that’s bad for the company. When you want to unsubscribe from a mailing list, but the ‘Unsubscribe’ button is tiny, low-contrast, and buried in paragraphs of text at the bottom of an email, it’s a strong sign the company is putting up subtle roadblocks between you and cancellation.”

MakeUseOf: The 6 Best Simple Android Launchers for Parents and Grandparents

MakeUseOf: The 6 Best Simple Android Launchers for Parents and Grandparents. “A simpler launcher can solve most of the difficulties your grandparent or parent faces on their Android phone. The default one often promotes its fanciest functions, complicating essential actions like calling in the process. Thankfully, you can choose from a range of third-party launchers that are designed with older users in mind. They’re easy to navigate and don’t have any extra features that just get in the way of basic usage.”

Google News: the full coverage feature (UX Collective)

UX Collective: Google News: the full coverage feature. “Google News is used by hundreds of millions of users across the world. That’s why I admire the audacity of vision here and appreciate Google’s efforts to solve such a wicked hard problem; Especially when you put into context the amount of data generated over the Internet. According to a research report by Domo, users of the Internet generate 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every day, and 90% of that data over the Internet was created in the last two years only. The data Google News has to organize will seem minuscule in comparison to that scale. However, it’s still HUGE by any standard.” Really gets down in the weeds (in a good way!)

Ars Technica: Behold, the most (intentionally) poorly designed website ever created

Ars Technica: Behold, the most (intentionally) poorly designed website ever created. “Sometimes we take Web and user interface design for granted—that’s the point of User Inyerface, a hilariously and deliberately difficult-to-use website created to show just how much we rely on past habits and design conventions to interact with the Web and our digital devices.”

The Instagram of Trust: How to Redesign the Architecture of Trust in Products (Hacker Noon)

Hacker Noon: The Instagram of Trust: How to Redesign the Architecture of Trust in Products. “More technology requires us to give up our privacy for the cost of better personalization. But how to fix the issue of ever growing lack of trust in our society? More and more brands are asking people for trust based on their promises and by being transparent about its policies. But the psychology of trust works quite differently. There have been many attempts and debates happening around the black box of algorithms and being transparent about how the algorithms work. But I would like to ask: Is transparency enough? Is it an effective way to build a long-lasting relationship with a customer? Is it going to build trust in a brand and in a product?”

UX Collective: Are you sure? — how user interfaces undermine consent

UX Collective: Are you sure? — how user interfaces undermine consent. “As more and more of our human interactions are mediated through software interfaces, our tools should model the good consent patterns that we would expect from decent humans. If the software is being coercive and creepy, we should ask why and change that pattern. Every non-consensual thing a software interface does was designed that way by a human; it can be designed not to do it.”

Wired: Beep! Bloop! Buzz! Why Do UX Designers Often Neglect Sound?

Wired: Beep! Bloop! Buzz! Why Do UX Designers Often Neglect Sound?. “Most companies would never consider using an online library to select their brand logo or visual identity. Yet they frequently allow their products to go out into the world with cheaply produced or licensed sounds downloaded from a mass market sound effects library. Why this undervaluation of sound and music?”

EurekAlert: Subtle visual cues nudge users to reveal more in online forum

EurekAlert: Subtle visual cues nudge users to reveal more in online forum. “In a study, researchers found that people using an online sexual health forum featuring computer graphics, called icons, that implied a sense of crowd size and connectivity, revealed more sensitive information than visitors to a site without those visual cues, said S. Shyam Sundar, James P. Jimirro Professor of Media Effects and co-director of the Media Effects Research Laboratory. Pictures meant to convey a sense of community on the web forum did not significantly affect the user’s disclosure, he added.”