Yale School of Medicine: Virtual Reality Game Is an Effective Tool for Vaping Prevention Among Teens

Yale School of Medicine: Virtual Reality Game Is an Effective Tool for Vaping Prevention Among Teens. “Yale researchers have developed an immersive, virtual reality video game that helps teens learn about the dangers of e-cigarettes and practice strategies for refusing them. E-cigarette use among youth is on the rise—they are the most popular smoking product used by middle and high school students in the U.S. Approximately half of teenagers between 14-18 years old have tried an e-cigarette at least once, while about 10% of teens vape regularly. However, many teens are unaware of the long-lasting effects nicotine can have on a developing brain.”

Techdirt: Juul Rented A Scientific Journal For a Month To Spread Glorified Marketing

Techdirt: Juul Rented A Scientific Journal For a Month To Spread Glorified Marketing. “Juul is sparing no expense to try and convince the FDA to keep its products on store shelves. Buried in a New York Times report on the looming FDA decision was an interesting nugget: namely that the company had paid $51,000 for a month of favorable coverage in the American Journal of Health Behavior.”

TechCrunch: TikTok is being used by vape sellers marketing to teens

TechCrunch: TikTok is being used by vape sellers marketing to teens. “Although a 2019 U.S. law made it illegal to sell or market e-cigarettes to anyone under the age of 21, TikTok videos featuring top brands of disposable e-cigarettes and vapes for sale have been relatively easy to find on the app. These videos, set to popular and upbeat music, clearly target a teenage customer base with offers of now-unauthorized cartridge flavors like fruit and mint in the form of a disposable vape. Some sellers even promote their ‘discreet’ packaging services, where the vapes they ship to customers can be hidden from parents’ prying eyes by being placed under the package’s stuffing or tucked inside other products, like makeup bags or fuzzy slippers.”

EurekAlert: How vaping companies are use Instagram to market to young people

EurekAlert: How vaping companies are use Instagram to market to young people. “E-cigarettes are highly addictive nicotine products with unclear health impacts, particularly on young people. Instagram is a visual social media platform which is wildly popular, particularly with young people. Researchers interested in public health at Aalto university in Finland studied how vaping is represented on the platform. By using artificial intelligence, they were able to analyse hundreds of thousands of posts from a 6-month period last year, and found that a large portion of posts are promoting controversial flavoured e-liquids to young audiences.”

CNET: Can vaping make coronavirus infections more severe? 3 doctors weigh in

CNET: Can vaping make coronavirus infections more severe? 3 doctors weigh in. “As the coronavirus pandemic continues to wreak havoc across the globe, scientists are looking into any factors that may exacerbate the spread of the virus and the illness it causes. We know that the immunocompromised and the elderly are at higher risk, but researchers are starting to turn their attention to another potential risk factor: vaping.”

Armed guards, secret location: Inside an illegal marijuana bazaar publicized on Instagram (CNBC)

CNBC: Armed guards, secret location: Inside an illegal marijuana bazaar publicized on Instagram. “Shopping for illicit vape cartridges on Instagram is astonishingly simple. Open the app, plug in a hashtag such as #vapecartsforsale and — voilà — multiple posts appear with pictures of THC cartridges. In the comments or caption section, sellers advertise their products and post phone numbers for would-be buyers.”

‘Consistent evidence’ social media pushes non-smokers into vaping: study (Brisbane Times)

Brisbane Times: ‘Consistent evidence’ social media pushes non-smokers into vaping: study. “Advertising for electronic cigarettes is pushing non-smokers and young people to take up vaping despite the health risks, in a finding that will galvanise opponents of the push to legalise nicotine vaping in Australia. Researchers from Macquarie University reviewed 43 studies involving 27,303 people globally to examine the effect of e-cigarette marketing on non-smokers.”

Digital Trends: Instagram bans influencers from promoting tobacco and vaping in branded content

Digital Trends: Instagram bans influencers from promoting tobacco and vaping in branded content. “Social media influencers on Instagram aren’t allowed to promote vaping, tobacco products, or weapons anymore as part of newly updated rules on the platform. Facebook-owned Instagram announced on Wednesday that branded posts promoting any of those goods are no longer allowed on either social media platform.”

Insights: As Social Media Sites Fiddle Over Cannabis Creator Bans, Public Health Suffers (Tubefilter)

Tubefilter: Insights: As Social Media Sites Fiddle Over Cannabis Creator Bans, Public Health Suffers. “What if a health crisis was brewing that hit young people in particular, yet none of the social-media platforms that depend on that audience would allow influencers to talk about it? That’s pretty much what’s happening right now in the world of vaping. People are dying, says Instagram influencer Koala Puffs (she goes by Koala Puffss there, because her original two-year-old account was shut down; she uses variants of the shorter version on other platforms), but it can be risky to talk about the issue on social media.”

BuzzFeed News: Dozens Of YouTube Videos Are Showing People How To Make Potentially Dangerous Vape Oil

BuzzFeed News: Dozens Of YouTube Videos Are Showing People How To Make Potentially Dangerous Vape Oil. “As health agencies scramble to control a rash of mysterious vaping-related lung injuries, YouTube is playing host to dozens of videos that offer step-by-step instructions on how to make black-market THC vape oil. Some of these videos, which are rife with safety hazards, including the use of potentially harmful chemicals, have been viewed millions of times.”

WTVD: FDA forces some social media influencers to add warnings to posts after they advertise unsafe vape, e-liquid products

WTVD: FDA forces some social media influencers to add warnings to posts after they advertise unsafe vape, e-liquid products. “Some popular social media accounts are posting new warnings after a federal crackdown. The Federal Trade Commission and the Food and Drug Administration are targeting accounts that promote and market vape and e-liquid products.”

Engadget: Social media ads for vaping must include nicotine warnings, FTC says

Engadget: Social media ads for vaping must include nicotine warnings, FTC says. “The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned a handful of ‘e-liquid,’ or vape, companies that they — and their social media influencers — must follow the same advertising rules as everyone else. Specifically, ads for vaping products that contain nicotine must include warning labels, as nicotine is an addictive chemical. “

WMBF: How social media pitches e-cigarettes to young people

WMBF: How social media pitches e-cigarettes to young people. “Leading e-cigarette company Juul Labs has tried to distance itself from a vast social media presence that experts say drives its popularity among teens. But a CNN investigation sheds new light on how the company was encouraging – and at times paying for – social media users to promote its nicotine-filled product to thousands of their followers”