Miami Herald: Guyana wants Facebook, Twitter to remove ‘illegal maps’ claiming parts for Venezuela

Miami Herald: Guyana wants Facebook, Twitter to remove ‘illegal maps’ claiming parts for Venezuela. “Guyana, which is considered part of the 15-member Caribbean Community though it lies on the northern coast of South America, shouldering the Atlantic, is asking Facebook and Twitter to get their facts straight and remove what the government considers ‘illegal maps’ of the former British colony. The maps, say the country’s office of foreign affairs, are being posted by Spanish-language media accounts and are claiming a large swath of Guyana for neighboring Venezuela.”

Diálogo Americas: Russia Leads the Way in Disinformation Campaigns, Study Finds

Diálogo Americas: Russia Leads the Way in Disinformation Campaigns, Study Finds. “Russia is the leading promoter of disinformation, according to a report by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI) that analyzed public Twitter datasets. Iran, China, and Venezuela also ranked high in the March 30 report, Understanding Global Disinformation and Information Operations. The study analyzed Twitter messages sent by state actors of various countries between October 2018 and March 2021. The think tank’s researchers analyzed the activities and content of Twitter-banned accounts within 90 days of an account previous tweet.”

New York Times: From Dalí to Picasso, a Museum With a Masterpiece Collection Partially Reopens

New York Times: From Dalí to Picasso, a Museum With a Masterpiece Collection Partially Reopens. “The vaults above inundated basements contain the region’s largest public collection of Pablo Picasso’s works, as well as hundreds of millions of dollars worth of paintings and drawings by masters such as Joan Miró, Marc Chagall and Lucian Freud. Nearby, 700 sculptures by iconic artists, including Salvador Dalí and Fernando Botero, are crammed in a large room to protect them against encroaching humidity. This is Venezuela’s Caracas Museum of Modern Art, or MACC, once a regional reference for cultural education, that has fallen victim to economic collapse and authoritarianism.”

BellingCat: Launching an Open Source Aircraft Database for Venezuela

Thanks to Tish W. for the heads-up! BellingCat: Launching an Open Source Aircraft Database for Venezuela . “In January 2020, I started an open database of aircraft registered in Venezuela. Using open source flight tracking data and helpful tips from aircraft tracking enthusiasts, the database now includes details on approximately 240 aircraft. The vast majority of these aircraft are registered in Venezuela, but some are foreign-registered with some connection to the country (more on that later).”

BBC: Venezuelans brave ‘brutal’ migrant route made tougher by pandemic

BBC: Venezuelans brave ‘brutal’ migrant route made tougher by pandemic. “Ángel García breathed heavily through his mouth as he hiked out of Pamplona, a scenic town nested in the Andes Mountains and located 2,300 meters above sea level. With his belongings stuffed into a blue back-pack and a red gym bag that hung from his right shoulder, the 21-year-old was making a 1,600km (1,000 mile) trek to the Colombian city of Cali, where he was hoping to live with a cousin and find construction work.”

Coronavirus: Peru allows Venezuela medics amid pandemic (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Peru allows Venezuela medics amid pandemic. “Peru is letting thousands of Venezuelan health workers who fled their country join the Peruvian health system during the coronavirus pandemic. Peruvian President Martín Vizcarra signed a decree which exempts qualified foreign doctors and nurses from having to validate their degrees. Peru has more than 430,000 cases of coronavirus and its health service has been struggling.”

Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas: Armando. info, recognized by the Cabot Prize, seeks to build great archive of corruption and human rights violations in Venezuela

Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas: Armando. info, recognized by the Cabot Prize, seeks to build great archive of corruption and human rights violations in Venezuela. “The year 2014 undoubtedly set the stage for the current situation in Venezuela. In that year, there were massive protests that began in February and lasted until June, with a balance of 43 people killed, 878 wounded and 3,306 detained, including opposition leader Leopoldo López, according to information obtained by the Inter-American Commission on Rights Human (IACHR).”

Information operations on Twitter: principles, process, and disclosure (Twitter Blog)

Twitter Blog: Information operations on Twitter: principles, process, and disclosure. “In October 2018, we published the first comprehensive archive of Tweets and media associated with known state-backed information operations on Twitter. Since its launch, thousands of researchers from across the globe have downloaded datasets, which contain more than 30 million Tweets and over 1 terabyte of media, using our archive to conduct their own investigations and to share their insights and independent analysis with the world. Today, we’re adding six additional datasets to our archive, covering coordinated, state-backed activities originating from four jurisdictions. All accounts have been removed from Twitter.”

The Editor’s Desk: Covering the uprooted

The Editor’s Desk: Covering the uprooted. “Each spring, journalism students from UNC-Chapel Hill create a multimedia project that focuses on a place and topic. Previous subjects have included the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and the youth movement in Cuba. This year, the students focused on refugees in Colombia who have left Venezuela to escape political turmoil and to find jobs and medical care. The result is Uprooted, a website that uses text, graphics, photographs and video to tell their stories.”

Vox: Inside Venezuela’s YouTube prank economy

Vox: Inside Venezuela’s YouTube prank economy. “Venezuela makes sense as the epicenter for paid pranks. The country is in shambles — saddled with a rapidly atrophying economy and a penniless government. Inflation has risen by an incomprehensible 833,997 percent in the past 12 months, and the commercial consequences are outright dystopian. For instance, the Guardian reports that a chicken in the country currently costs about 14 million bolívares. Naturally, some Venezuelans have turned elsewhere — like the loose pockets of bored American teenagers — to make ends meet. Slime stunts and pie stunts don’t require a ton of overhead, and Betsy doesn’t hold back when I ask her how Fiverr contributes to her overall livelihood.”

NPR: For Many In Venezuela, Social Media Is A Matter Of Life And Death

NPR: For Many In Venezuela, Social Media Is A Matter Of Life And Death. “For many Venezuelans, the relationship with social media is a tricky one. On the one hand, it is a valuable source of information in a country that censors all forms of traditional news media. It can be a lifeline for those seeking help, and a form of protest — the only way to speak truth to power. On the other hand, being too vocal on social media can have dangerous repercussions.”

Flickr: Welcome the Amadeo León Collection to the Flickr Commons!

From Flickr, and it seems like I haven’t seen one of these announcements in a long time: Welcome the Amadeo León Collection to the Flickr Commons! “We’re thrilled to welcome the Amadeo León Collection of Boconó Photographs to the Flickr Commons! The Amadeo León Collection is a private effort to digitize about 12,500 film negatives of the people and sights of a small city in the Venezuelan Andes.”