BBC: Venezuelans brave ‘brutal’ migrant route made tougher by pandemic

BBC: Venezuelans brave ‘brutal’ migrant route made tougher by pandemic. “Ángel García breathed heavily through his mouth as he hiked out of Pamplona, a scenic town nested in the Andes Mountains and located 2,300 meters above sea level. With his belongings stuffed into a blue back-pack and a red gym bag that hung from his right shoulder, the 21-year-old was making a 1,600km (1,000 mile) trek to the Colombian city of Cali, where he was hoping to live with a cousin and find construction work.”

Coronavirus: Peru allows Venezuela medics amid pandemic (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Peru allows Venezuela medics amid pandemic. “Peru is letting thousands of Venezuelan health workers who fled their country join the Peruvian health system during the coronavirus pandemic. Peruvian President Martín Vizcarra signed a decree which exempts qualified foreign doctors and nurses from having to validate their degrees. Peru has more than 430,000 cases of coronavirus and its health service has been struggling.”

Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas: Armando. info, recognized by the Cabot Prize, seeks to build great archive of corruption and human rights violations in Venezuela

Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas: Armando. info, recognized by the Cabot Prize, seeks to build great archive of corruption and human rights violations in Venezuela. “The year 2014 undoubtedly set the stage for the current situation in Venezuela. In that year, there were massive protests that began in February and lasted until June, with a balance of 43 people killed, 878 wounded and 3,306 detained, including opposition leader Leopoldo López, according to information obtained by the Inter-American Commission on Rights Human (IACHR).”

Information operations on Twitter: principles, process, and disclosure (Twitter Blog)

Twitter Blog: Information operations on Twitter: principles, process, and disclosure. “In October 2018, we published the first comprehensive archive of Tweets and media associated with known state-backed information operations on Twitter. Since its launch, thousands of researchers from across the globe have downloaded datasets, which contain more than 30 million Tweets and over 1 terabyte of media, using our archive to conduct their own investigations and to share their insights and independent analysis with the world. Today, we’re adding six additional datasets to our archive, covering coordinated, state-backed activities originating from four jurisdictions. All accounts have been removed from Twitter.”

The Editor’s Desk: Covering the uprooted

The Editor’s Desk: Covering the uprooted. “Each spring, journalism students from UNC-Chapel Hill create a multimedia project that focuses on a place and topic. Previous subjects have included the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and the youth movement in Cuba. This year, the students focused on refugees in Colombia who have left Venezuela to escape political turmoil and to find jobs and medical care. The result is Uprooted, a website that uses text, graphics, photographs and video to tell their stories.”

Vox: Inside Venezuela’s YouTube prank economy

Vox: Inside Venezuela’s YouTube prank economy. “Venezuela makes sense as the epicenter for paid pranks. The country is in shambles — saddled with a rapidly atrophying economy and a penniless government. Inflation has risen by an incomprehensible 833,997 percent in the past 12 months, and the commercial consequences are outright dystopian. For instance, the Guardian reports that a chicken in the country currently costs about 14 million bolívares. Naturally, some Venezuelans have turned elsewhere — like the loose pockets of bored American teenagers — to make ends meet. Slime stunts and pie stunts don’t require a ton of overhead, and Betsy doesn’t hold back when I ask her how Fiverr contributes to her overall livelihood.”

NPR: For Many In Venezuela, Social Media Is A Matter Of Life And Death

NPR: For Many In Venezuela, Social Media Is A Matter Of Life And Death. “For many Venezuelans, the relationship with social media is a tricky one. On the one hand, it is a valuable source of information in a country that censors all forms of traditional news media. It can be a lifeline for those seeking help, and a form of protest — the only way to speak truth to power. On the other hand, being too vocal on social media can have dangerous repercussions.”

Flickr: Welcome the Amadeo León Collection to the Flickr Commons!

From Flickr, and it seems like I haven’t seen one of these announcements in a long time: Welcome the Amadeo León Collection to the Flickr Commons! “We’re thrilled to welcome the Amadeo León Collection of Boconó Photographs to the Flickr Commons! The Amadeo León Collection is a private effort to digitize about 12,500 film negatives of the people and sights of a small city in the Venezuelan Andes.”

The Verge: Venezuela is blocking access to the Tor network

The Verge: Venezuela is blocking access to the Tor network. “Venezuela has blocked all access to the Tor network, according to an Access Now report citing activists within the country. Coming just months after a new round of web blocks within the country, the latest block includes both direct connections to the network and connections over bridge relays, which had escaped many previous Tor blocks.”

Georgia Tech: IC Researchers Highlight Design Implications as Venezuelans Turn to Facebook for Barter, Exchange

Georgia Tech: IC Researchers Highlight Design Implications as Venezuelans Turn to Facebook for Barter, Exchange. “Consider a scenario in which economic turmoil and hyperinflation have made it nearly impossible to purchase many of life’s basic necessities. There are food and medicine shortages, and scammers purchase what is available in bulk in an effort to manage the flow and pricing of supplies at the expense of other citizens. How, then, might honest citizens go about navigating the challenging circumstances to procure the items they need to survive? It’s a familiar environment to Venezuelan citizens who, since an economic crisis gripped the country in 2014, have faced such barriers in their daily lives. Out of necessity, many have turned to online solidarity economies like Facebook groups that are dedicated to a fairer system of barter and exchange.” I had never heard the term “solidarity economy” before. Haverford College enlightened me.

Telesur: Costa Rica Shows Pre-Columbian Artifacts Returned by Venezuela

Telesur: Costa Rica Shows Pre-Columbian Artifacts Returned by Venezuela. “”This repatriation case of a Costa Rican archeological archive represents a legal milestone in the fight against illicit trafficking of cultural assets in Latin America,” says the National Museum. The National Museum of Costa Rica (MNCR) is exhibiting 196 recovered pre-Columbian artifacts after they were decommissioned in Venezuela between 2010 and 2014 and brought back to the Central American country by sea.”

Local 10: Venezuelan government censors social media with new law

Local 10: Venezuelan government censors social media with new law. “Socialist legislators passed a new law Wednesday making journalists’ stories that incite ‘hate and intolerance’ illegal. Those in violation could face a maximum prison sentence of 20 years or hefty fines. Venezuelan’s socialist legislative super body, or constituent assembly, passed the new legislation to censor private media outlets and social media users who reported on protests against President Nicolas Maduro and his administration — amid shortages of food and medications. “

Bloomberg: Venezuela Eyes Censoring Social Media After Public Shaming Wave

Bloomberg: Venezuela Eyes Censoring Social Media After Public Shaming Wave. “Venezuela is considering banning messages that promote ‘hate’ and ‘intolerance’ on social media and messenger services, according to Delcy Rodriguez, the president of the country’s all-powerful constituent assembly. Rodriguez told reporters on Monday that the South American nation is looking to limit messages that fuel bigotry and confrontation between Venezuelans in a so-called anti-hate law, which is currently being debated by the legislative super body, known as the constituyente.”

Global Voices: With Facebook, Twitter and YouTube Blocked, Venezuelans Share Tech Advice

Global Voices: With Facebook, Twitter and YouTube Blocked, Venezuelans Share Tech Advice. “On the evening of June 28, Internet users from various cities in Venezuela reported that multiple websites and social media platforms — including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Periscope — were inaccessible.”

Engadget: Twitter blocks a slew of Venezuela government accounts

Engadget: Twitter blocks a slew of Venezuela government accounts. “Venezuela has been accused of censoring Twitter as part of its bid to silence dissent, but it’s not so happy now that the shoe is on the other foot. The country’s leadership says that Twitter has suspended 180 accounts linked to the government, including radio and TV outlets in the presidential palace. While it’s not clear what prompted the move, officials are furious — President Maduro claims that Twitter blocked accounts ‘simply for being Chavistas,’ or supporters of his late predecessor Hugo Chavez.”