MakeUseOf: How to Make a Time-Lapse Video by Converting a Standard Video

MakeUseOf: How to Make a Time-Lapse Video by Converting a Standard Video . “Making a time-lapse video usually takes a lot time. You need to have a suitable camera, enough storage for the photos, a reliable stand or tripod, and good weather conditions if you’re outside. Time-lapse videos can take a while to get right, and this might require several attempts. Want to make a time-lapse video but don’t have the patience or hardware? Fortunately, there are several tools you can use to do the job.”

Typito: Your post production buddy (NeverEnding Search)

NeverEnding Search: Typito: Your post production buddy. “Post-production is what makes your media feel professional and done. But not everyone has access to, or the chops to use, a robust video editor like Final Cut Pro or Adobe After Effects. And not everyone wants to spend the arduous time it sometimes takes to make a video product feel professionally spiffy. Typito is a relatively new video editing tool designed to be your time-saving, affordable, post-production friend. It allows even rookie editors to create a little magic on top of the videos they shoot or collect.”

Medium: Facebook, news publishers, and the ‘demand’ for video

Medium: Facebook, news publishers, and the ‘demand’ for video. “Facebook traffic and engagement is way down for so many small to medium size publishers… and some bigger ones too. And the whole video thing is nuts. In my opinion, Facebook has and still is creating a fake ‘demand’ for video. Video only looks so popular because Facebook’s algorithm is making it that way. It intentionally prioritises and shows us all more and more video so there is a corresponding meteoric rise in video views.”

Wired: When YouTube Removes Violent Videos, It Impedes Justice

Wired: When YouTube Removes Violent Videos, It Impedes Justice. “When the International Criminal Court issued an arrest warrant for Mahmoud al-Werfelli in August for the war crime of murder in Libya, it marked a watershed moment for open-source investigations. For those of us who embrace the promise of the digital landscape for justice and accountability, it came as welcome validation that content found on Facebook and YouTube form a good deal of the evidence before the Court. But this relatively new path to justice is at risk of becoming a dead-end.”

PRNewswire: Tiny Archipelago Creates Faroe Islands Translate to Petition Google Translate to Share Their Language (PRESS RELEASE)

PRNewswire: Tiny Archipelago Creates Faroe Islands Translate to Petition Google Translate to Share Their Language (PRESS RELEASE). “Creating their very own version of the online translation service, with the help of locals who will translate live by video, Faroe Islands Translate will provide a free online service for those visiting the destination or, in fact, anyone around the world curious to learn a little of this unusual language…. By visiting the new website, and typing the words to be translated into the Faroe Islands Translate search box, the translation will be made by a local volunteer like Guðrun. A video with the translation will be sent back so that people will not only be able to learn the words in Faroese but also see a local speaking the language.” That is really cool. The site already has tons of videos of people speaking Faroese phrases.

Kickstarter Corner: Project Aims to Let Users Clip Government Videos and Share on Social Media

An interesting idea from Kickstarter Corner, though unfortunately it has no backers with 19 days left, so I’m not sure it’ll get off the ground: LiLGov.com. From the project’s description: “LiLGov is a project I have been working on for a year now. I want anyone to be able to search for their local government videos and find out what their representatives are saying. With LiLGov you will also be able to share specific moments of the meetings with other people on social media allowing change to happen. It is completely free and will never have ads, my goal is to make local government accessible to everyone. With your donation I will be able to improve the website and keep the website hosted for 1 year. “

Cearta: The copyright implications of a publicly curated online archive of Oireachtas debates

Cearta: The copyright implications of a publicly curated online archive of Oireachtas debates. “From a twitter thread by Philip Boucher-Hayes last week, I learned that Ken Foxe had reported in the Irish Mail on Sunday that nearly ten years of video footage of Oireachtas debates and hearings had been taken offline. A spokesperson for the Houses of the Oireachtas said that the videos were removed because they had little traffic and were in an obsolete format. However, after an outcry online, the footage was restored, though with limited functionality. To overcome first the takedown, and then the limitations, various concerned netizens – including, I understand, Gerard Cunningham, Emerald De Leeuw, Elaine Edwards, and Sterling Plisken – have begun work on a publicly curated online archive of Oireachtas debates and hearings.”