CNET: Make papercraft models of vintage computers and gaming systems

CNET: Make papercraft models of vintage computers and gaming systems. “If you’re looking for a nostalgia fix and something crafty to do during your coronavirus lockdown, why not build a vintage computer or gaming system with these easy paper model kits? These highly detailed color paper models are free to download and share.”

Mike Shouts: SwiftUI iPod Classic Project Brings iPod Classic Interface To Your iPhone

Mike Shouts: SwiftUI iPod Classic Project Brings iPod Classic Interface To Your iPhone. “Smartphone has changed the way we consume music. Its integration with our lives was slow, but seamless enough that we forgot how much we miss the iPod Classic. We didn’t how much we miss the good’ol iPod (and by extension, the good’ol Jobs-era Apple) until we saw the SwiftUI iPod Classic Project. So what the hell is SwiftUI iPod Classic Project? Oh, nothing much really. It is just an awesome app that turns your iPhone into an iPod Classic.”

Rebble with a Cause: How Pebble Watches Were Granted an Amazing Afterlife (iFixit)

iFixit: Rebble with a Cause: How Pebble Watches Were Granted an Amazing Afterlife. “In the early summer of 2018, you could buy an Apple Watch with built-in GPS, wireless payments, and speakers that buzz water out after a swim. Meanwhile, Katharine Berry was hustling to keep five-year-old watches with black and white screens alive.”

Engadget: Adorable internet-connected bunny Nabaztag is being resurrected

Engadget: Adorable internet-connected bunny Nabaztag is being resurrected. Yay! I think I still have one around here somewhere. “Robot pets have come a long way since the heady days of Tamagotchi — we’ve got Sony’s adorable Aibo that requires training and Groove X’s fuzzy Lovot that follows you affectionately around the house. But none have quite captured the spirit of the delightful Nabaztag, the cute internet-connected robo-bunny released in 2005, which communicated information through color, motion and sound. Now, thanks to a crowdfunding endeavor, Nabaztag is hopping back into our lives.”

How to Use Your iPhone as a Webcam: 5 Methods That Work (MakeUseOf)

MakeUseOf: How to Use Your iPhone as a Webcam: 5 Methods That Work. “Did you know it’s possible to use your iPhone as a webcam? It’s never going to quite mimic a webcam in the traditional sense, but there are a few apps that’ll record the phone’s camera and send it to a Mac, a Windows PC, another mobile device, or even to the web.”

Dust off that old Pentium, Linux fans: It’s Elive (The Register)

The Register: Dust off that old Pentium, Linux fans: It’s Elive. “Designed to run on minimal hardware, Elive is very much a passion project of its leader, Samuel F Baggen. Based on Debian, the first version took a bow in 2005. The second stable version made an appearance in 2010 and it has been a long eight years for the third stable version to become available.” If you’ve got some old rigs laying around that need an OS, this might do this trick. Crazy-low system requirements.

The Register: Oz retro computer collection in dire straits, bulldozers on horizon

The Register: Oz retro computer collection in dire straits, bulldozers on horizon. “Australian retro computer fans, it’s time to mobilise: the shoestring volunteers trying to preserve computer history here are the end of their lease, money, and wits. So if you have storage space and a sentimental feeling about, say, a DEC MicroVAX 4000, part of a PDP-11, or a Control Data CDC-6600 backplane, you’ll be welcomed with open arms by the Australian Computer History Museum.”

Bit-Tech: BBC launches Computer Literacy Project archive

Bit-Tech: BBC launches Computer Literacy Project archive. “The BBC has added the output of its Computer Literacy Project, covering more than 260 full-length TV programmes and 166 BBC Micro computer programs, to its Taster testing site – though nostalgic programmers have only three months to try it out. Launched in 1982 with The Computer Programme, which was followed by Making the Most of the Micro a year later and Micro Live between 1984 and 1987, the BBC’s Computer Literacy Project followed the UK government’s push to get microcomputers – at the time rare novelties – into schools throughout the country.”

DIY Photography: This Photographer Shot Formula 1 With Game Boy Camera And Clip-on Smartphone Lens

This is so off-topic, but I love it. Apologies. From DIY Photography: This Photographer Shot Formula 1 With Game Boy Camera And Clip-on Smartphone Lens. “Game Boy camera was launched twenty years ago, and technology has advanced immensely since then. Nevertheless, experimenting with this toy camera in the modern era is still kind of fun. Photographer Tim Binnion recently brought his to 2018 Chinese Grand Prix in Shanghai, China. He captured the Formula 1 race with the 0.016-megapixel camera, and the results are unusual and pretty amazing.”

The Register: NASA dusts off FORTRAN manual, revives 20-year-old data on Ganymede

The Register: NASA dusts off FORTRAN manual, revives 20-year-old data on Ganymede. “NASA scientists have made some new discoveries about Jupiter’s giant moon Ganymede, thanks to a dedicated team, an elderly VAX machine and 20-year-old data from the long-defunct Galileo probe. Fifteen years after Galileo (no, not that one) ended its days with a plunge into the atmosphere of Jupiter, NASA scientists have resurrected the 20-year-old datasets and added more detail to the puzzle of Ganymede’s magnetosphere.”

TechCrunch: Conserve the Sound is an archive of noises from old tape players, projectors and other dying tech

New-to-me, from TechCrunch: Conserve the Sound is an archive of noises from old tape players, projectors and other dying tech. “All of us grew up around tech different from what we have today, and many of us look back on those devices with fondness. But can you recall the exact sound your first Casio keyboard made, or the cadence of a rotary phone’s clicks? Conserve the Sound aims to, well, conserve the sound of gadgets like these so that future generations will know what it sounded like to put a cartridge in the NES.”

Linux Journal: Introducing the CAPS0ff Project

Linux Journal: Introducing the CAPS0ff Project. “It’s no secret that I love classic video games. Fortunately, thanks to emulation, many of the classic arcade games still can be enjoyed and forever will be available via digital copies of the ROM chips. Sadly, some older systems have protection, making them impossible to dump into ROMs properly. If the chips can’t be dumped, how will you ever get a digital copy of the ROM data? Well, the folks over at the CAPS0ff blog actually are disassembling the original chips and painstakingly transcribing the contents one bit at a time. They’re literally looking at the chips and determining the 1s and 0s burned onto them. Yes, there are a lot of chips. Yes, it takes a long time to copy the bits one by one. And yes, you can help. When a chip is stripped down literally to its bits (using various acid baths and so forth), it is scanned at high resolution. Then, pieces of the chips are put into a database, and people like you and me can transcribe the photos into 1s and 0s for the project!”

Los Angeles Times: Apple apologizes for slowed-down iPhones and offers cheaper battery replacement

Los Angeles Times: Apple apologizes for slowed-down iPhones and offers cheaper battery replacement. “Apple Inc. announced Thursday that it will temporarily lower the price of replacing iPhone batteries, hoping to ease the backlash over its acknowledgment that it deliberately slowed down older-model iPhones.”

Radio NZ: Outdated tech trove keeps digital archives alive

Radio NZ: Outdated tech trove keeps digital archives alive. “Government records have to be transferred to archives after 25 years, and while that is fine for paper documents, it can be a lot harder when the material was saved on computers from 1992. The items on Mr Crouch’s shelves include a Macintosh Classic 2, some 8″ floppy disks and a small – but remarkably heavy – disk drive to play them on, and even a classic bulky old Wang computer from about 30 years ago.”

The Register: Fresh bit o’ Linux to spruce up that ancient Windows Vista box? Why not, we say…

The Register: Fresh bit o’ Linux to spruce up that ancient Windows Vista box? Why not, we say… . “The Linux OS is flexible. If one Linux distro is an unfriendly fit, you can replace it with another one that has a more appealing options list on the desktop environment or user interface front. Debian-based Q4OS, developed by a team of software designers in Germany, has a lightweight design that allows it to run on nearly any hardware config. I have run it on ageing computers from the early days of Windows Vista.”