Lifehacker: How Can I Close Accounts for Old Services I Don’t Use Anymore?

Lifehacker: How Can I Close Accounts for Old Services I Don’t Use Anymore . “In your decade(s) of internet use, you’ve probably created dozens, if not hundreds, of user accounts—for online retailers, gaming sites, messaging services, social media apps, and more. If you no longer want or need access to these accounts, take an afternoon to track down and delete what’s outdated.”

Boing Boing: The “One HTML Page Challenge”, a great example of view-source culture

Boing Boing: The “One HTML Page Challenge”, a great example of view-source culture. “Behold the “One HTML Page Challenge” — to build a one-page site using just the code in a single html file: ‘Practice your skills with no assistance from libraries, no separation of files, and no assistance of a modern framework.'” Giving me all the nostalgic feels.

Ubergizmo: Chrome Will Soon Stop Supporting FTP Connections

Ubergizmo: Chrome Will Soon Stop Supporting FTP Connections. “We’re not sure how many of you might remember, but back in the day, FTP servers were a popular way to host files online as well as to download them. These days, file hosting and downloading is done in a completely different manner, which is why it’s not surprising that Google has ultimately decided that they will soon stop supporting FTP connections in Chrome.”

National Library of New Zealand: Looking for Old Friends?

National Library of New Zealand: Looking for Old Friends?. “Old Friends (www.oldfriends.co.nz) was a popular social networking website owned by Trade Me. Its purpose was to help people locate former school friends and workmates. Members who signed up to Old Friends could upload photos, post comments, contact each other and compile information for reunions. The site was launched in 2002 and finally closed in 2016. When Trade Me announced that they would be taking the site down, the National Library quickly got in touch to see if we could work together to harvest a copy of Old Friends for the Library’s collections.”

Ars Technica: EverQuest’s long, strange 20-year trip still has no end in sight

Ars Technica: EverQuest’s long, strange 20-year trip still has no end in sight. “Twenty years ago, a company in Southern California launched an online game that would go on to serve as the model for many more titles to come in the massively multiplayer online RPG (MMORPG) space. And unlike many games that sought to replace it over the years, this one is still going today. No, this isn’t about World of Warcraft—that game only turns 15 in 2019. Before there was WoW, there was the MMO pioneer EverQuest. This sword-and-sorcery-based game was developed by a small company, 989 Studios, but it eventually reached its pinnacle under Sony Online Entertainment after SOE acquired that studio roughly a year after the game’s launch. Today, EQ marches on with a dedicated player base and another developer, Daybreak Games, at the helm.” An astounding deep dive.

TechAeris: The Version Museum aims to show you the history of some of the internets most famous websites

New-to-me, possibly a relaunch? TechAeris: The Version Museum aims to show you the history of some of the internets most famous websites. “Many of us have been using the internet for 20+ years and over those years we’ve seen the internet grow. Websites have become cleaner and more aesthetically pleasing and load times have decreased to mere seconds. But sometimes we forget what the internet looked like and how different it is from today. That’s where the Version Museum comes in.”

The Next Web: The SETI screensaver shows us what the internet could’ve been

The Next Web: The SETI screensaver shows us what the internet could’ve been. “SETI@home is a long-term science project currently run by the Berkeley Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley. It began in the early 1960s, when astronomers first began harvesting data from vast radio telescopes — like the one at Green Bank in West Virginia—to look for signs of life beyond Earth. The search and the science is much older than the screen saver, of course, which was released to the public in 1999 and still running today. But the screen saver has been directly helping that search for the past two decades.”