ABC News: Decades of history could be ‘erased from Australia’s memory’ as tape machines disappear, archivists warn

ABC News (Australia): Decades of history could be ‘erased from Australia’s memory’ as tape machines disappear, archivists warn. “Australia’s memory institutions are racing to digitise their magnetic tape collections before the year 2025, when archivists around the world expect it will become almost impossible to find working tape playback machines.”

The Internet Archive: Please Donate 78rpm Records to the Internet Archive’s Great 78 Project

The Internet Archive: Please Donate 78rpm Records to the Internet Archive’s Great 78 Project. “Good news: we have funding to preserve at least another 250,000 sides of 78rpm records, and we are looking for donations to digitize and physically preserve. We try to do a good job of digitizing and hosting the recordings and then thousands of people listen, learn, and enjoy these fabulous recordings.”

National Library of Australia: Australian Joint Copying Project Reimagined

National Library of Australia: Australian Joint Copying Project Reimagined. “The microfilm produced by the Australian Joint Copying Project has long been a first stop for those researching local or family history. The 10,400 microfilm reels however have been difficult to access even for those living near libraries holding the microfilm let alone those in rural areas. The content itself can often be dense and difficult to locate relevant information. The National Library of Australia has begun a new project to address these problems. Thanks to the Australian Public Service Modernisation Fund the AJCP Online Project will digitise the 7.5 million records captured on the original AJCP microfilm, delivering them online free of charge to all.”

Dublin InQuirer: How a Butcher Amassed a Photo Archive for East Wall

Dublin InQuirer: How a Butcher Amassed a Photo Archive for East Wall. “Each of the seven folders holds about a hundred prints. The collection began with a few photos, rescued from a skip around the corner, says Paddy Curtis, in his East Wall butchers’ shop last week.” This is a wonderful story. Please read it.

Ars Technica: Scientists found these old photographs contain metallic nanoparticles

Ars Technica: Scientists found these old photographs contain metallic nanoparticles. “Daguerreotypes are one of the earliest forms of photography, producing images on silver plates that look subtly different, depending on viewing angle. For instance they can appear positive or negative, or the colors can shift from bluish to brownish-red tones. Now an interdisciplinary team of scientists has discovered that these unusual optical effects are due to the presence of metallic nanoparticles in the plates. They described their findings in a new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.”

Lifehacker: How to Digitize Vinyl Records Without a Record Player

Lifehacker: How to Digitize Vinyl Records Without a Record Player. “Digitizing vinyl is a lot harder than ripping a CD. An external CD drive costs $26 on Amazon; a record player with a digital output costs $250 or more. Plus you have to use special software, specify the beginning and end of each track, write out all the metadata, and make sure the record plays smoothly. Or you can get someone else to do it for you. Here’s how.” And if you DO have a turntable and you want to rip a LOT of records, let me reup DJ Kippax’s crazy deep dive on album ripping.

The Flying Nun Project: Tally Ho! (National Library of New Zealand)

National Library of New Zealand: The Flying Nun Project: Tally Ho!. “Back in July 2018, we announced that the tape archive of renowned music label Flying Nun Records had been donated to the Alexander Turnbull Library. This news received media coverage from TVNZ, Radio NZ, Stuff, NZ Herald, The Spinoff and other outlets, as well as inspiring discussion on blogs and social media. Much interest stemmed from the plan to digitise the archive over three years – an urgent task given the global challenge of preserving magnetic tape AV media. Ten months on, the time is ripe for an update about how the Flying Nun Project is getting on, together with some exciting (new) news – and an unreleased recording to whet your appetite!”