The Shields Gazette: South Shields ship experts begin mammoth 3D-modelling project they admit may never be complete

The Shields Gazette: South Shields ship experts begin mammoth 3D-modelling project they admit may never be complete. “Since the late 1990s, South Shields Marine School has been one of only two UK centres – and the only teaching college – to create advanced graphics of ships and port and marine landscapes…. In that time, the marine school’s 3D-modelling team has made digital models of around 200 vessels and 120 ports or sea areas.”

SUPERJUMP: An Appeal Through the Nostalgia Glasses

SUPERJUMP: An Appeal Through the Nostalgia Glasses. “Any perusal through social media will show you that gaming’s appreciation goes far beyond whatever the most recent release is. Gamers love to talk about old games, and not through a fond ‘do you remember when’ anecdotal sense, but through a ‘I just played this very real game on my very real PlayStation 2 last week’ sense. It can be expensive for companies to leave their servers live and allow gamers to buy games that are ten, fifteen, twenty years old, but maybe this finally needs to be accepted as a sacrifice for the historical curation of the medium — or, maybe, we need to figure out a better way to make virtual consoles and re-releases viable that go beyond a complete obliteration every couple of console cycles. “

Caldera chronicles: Preserving the legacy of geologic mapping in Yellowstone (Missoulian)

Missoulian: Caldera chronicles: Preserving the legacy of geologic mapping in Yellowstone. “Today, geologic mapping is done digitally and is easily accessible in a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database, like the Geology of Yellowstone map, which is made possible by the Wyoming State Geological Survey. But what of the old paper maps, made before digital mapping was possible? It is critical that these maps are preserved and digitized, so that the information we have gained in years past remains accessible to all. A part of that effort is to convert older printed maps, as well as unpublished field mapping and observations, into digital GIS database products.”

Open Culture: The Internet Archive Hosts 20,000 VHS Recordings of Pop Culture from the 1980s & 1990s: Enter the VHS Vault

Open Culture: The Internet Archive Hosts 20,000 VHS Recordings of Pop Culture from the 1980s & 1990s: Enter the VHS Vault. “My neighborhood thrift store has a very large VHS wall, filled with Hollywood movies, endless children’s videos, instructional tapes, and best of all a box of unknown vids. Maybe they’re blank. Maybe they contain 6 episodes of Matlock. And maybe, just maybe, they have something completely nuts. But who has time or the old technology for that, especially when the Internet Archive has recently expanded its VHS Vault section to 20,000 digitized tapes under the (non) curation of archivist Jason Scott. We make no claims for the quality of the videos contained therein, because that’s really up to you.”

Gizmodo: ‘Deep Nostalgia’ Can Turn Old Photos of Your Relatives Into Moving Videos

Gizmodo: ‘Deep Nostalgia’ Can Turn Old Photos of Your Relatives Into Moving Videos. “It’s hard to feel connected to someone who’s gone through a static photo. So a company called MyHeritage who provides automatic AI-powered photo enhancements is now offering a new service that can animate people in old photos creating a short video that looks like it was recorded while they posed and prepped for the portrait.”

MakeUseOf: 4 Ways to Play Adobe Flash Games Without Flash

MakeUseOf: 4 Ways to Play Adobe Flash Games Without Flash. “Flash was a pillar of the internet through the 2000s and over a period of 20 years built a gaming legacy of unprecedented proportions, spanning tens of thousands of games. Now, as the websites hosting Flash content come down, many people are wondering, ‘will Flash’s gaming legacy suffer the same fate?’ In this article, we list a handful of projects intent on preserving Flash games for future generations.”

National Film and Sound Archive of Australia: Priceless Collection Of 100-year-old Films Digitally Restored

National Film and Sound Archive of Australia: Priceless Collection Of 100-year-old Films Digitally Restored. “The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (NFSA) has digitally restored The Corrick Collection, containing 135 of the world’s earliest films, which formed part of the Corrick Family Entertainers variety act over 100 years ago. A selection of these priceless films will have a world premiere at Ten Days on the Island from 5-21 March 2021, to celebrate the Corricks’ connection with Tasmania. Further national and international screenings will be announced in coming months. Additionally, five films from The Corrick Collection are now available to audiences worldwide on the NFSA’s YouTube channel.”

Computerworld Archives: Back From Vintage Microfilm (Internet Archive)

Internet Archive: Computerworld Archives: Back From Vintage Microfilm. “Years ago, the Internet Archive was honored to work with the Patrick J McGovern Foundation to bring some of the important publications of International Data Corporation onto the Internet for free public access. Today we are excited to bring a better looking version of the ComputerWorld archives to the Internet based on newly digitized microfilm.”

UPROXX: Meet The Community Of Preservationists In Search of Lost Movies

UPROXX: Meet The Community Of Preservationists In Search of Lost Movies. “Sometimes a mere 29 seconds can upset history. And sometimes that 29 seconds arrives in a garbage bag. Dino Everett works at the University of Southern California’s Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive, a job that sometimes means sorting through a lot of junk sent by well-meaning people who think they might have stumbled on an important find in their family attic. But not always. A few years ago, Everett received an unpromising package from Louisiana, an unwanted batch of movie reels someone had acquired in an estate sale, that reframed a key element of film history.”

BBC: Historic Kinora ‘flipbook footage’ of Wick saved for the future

BBC: Historic Kinora ‘flipbook footage’ of Wick saved for the future. “The National Library of Scotland spent years digitising the footage, which shows the hustle and bustle of the fishing industry in the Highland coastal town of Wick. The reels, some of which are up to 120 years old, were originally played on a device called a Kinora viewer. A reel of images printed on card was revolved in the viewer, creating an illusion similar to a flip-book animation.” The video is freely available to view online.

Reddit: Italian newspaper’s online archive is going to get lost because Flash won’t be supported anymore

Reddit: Italian newspaper’s online archive is going to get lost because Flash won’t be supported anymore. “Italian newspaper’s online archive is going to get lost because Flash won’t be supported anymore – edit: might get lost, they are actually working on it but my hopes aren’t too high.” I am linking to Reddit instead of the original article because a) the original is in Italian; b) I liked the Reddit discussion.

Master boot vinyl record: It just gives DOS on my IBM PC a warmer, more authentic tone (The Register)

The Register: Master boot vinyl record: It just gives DOS on my IBM PC a warmer, more authentic tone. “While booting an operating system nowadays usually sees the software loaded from disk or flash memory, some of us of a certain age recall the delights of shovelling bytes in memory via the medium of tape, such as an audio cassette sending noise into the RAM of a home computer. Tinkerer Jozef Bogin has taken things a little further by booting an elderly IBM PC from a record player.”

The Chattanoogan: “Hey Earl” Radio Programs Donated To Be Digitized

The Chattanoogan: “Hey Earl” Radio Programs Donated To Be Digitized. “Earl (Hey Earl) Freudenberg has donated over 500 audio cassette tapes of his popular ‘Hey Earl’ radio program on WDOD to Picnooga/Chattanooga Historical Society. Mr. Freudenberg’s radio presence in the Chattanooga area has spanned nearly 55 years, and his work started at WDOD in 1965. The shows he personally recorded are from the mid-1980s through the early 2000s and include many interviews of local and regional personalities.”