Fast Company: The Internet Archive wants to help you play your favorite Commodore 64 games

Fast Company: The Internet Archive wants to help you play your favorite Commodore 64 games. “The nonprofit digital library said it is in the process of adding in-browser emulation support for Commodore 64, aka the best-selling computer in history. The busy bees over at the Internet Archive have already tested over 10,500 programs and are adding more.”

BetaNews: Microsoft re-open-sources early versions of MS-DOS on GitHub

BetaNews: Microsoft re-open-sources early versions of MS-DOS on GitHub. “Back in 2014, Microsoft gave the source code for MS-DOS 1.25 and MS-DOS 2.0 to the Computer History Museum. Now — in a move it describes as ‘re-open-sourcing’ — the company has pushed the code to GitHub for all to see.” I am feeling old and creaky.

Neowin: Llama’s not dead, Winamp 5.8 Beta leaks online

Neowin: Llama’s not dead, Winamp 5.8 Beta leaks online . “Winamp was released in 1997 originally developed by Justin Frankel, later sold to AOL in 1999 for $80 million. It was then acquired by Radionomy for an undisclosed sum from AOL, back in 2014. Now, almost 4 years later and ahead of an expected official company announcement, a beta version for the upcoming Winamp 5.8… bearing a build date of October 26, 2016 has apparently been leaked on the web after being uploaded to the public by an anonymous user on a selection of filesharing sites.” As this is a leak, I wouldn’t trust it entirely, but I’m glad to get some evidence that Winamp is still under development.

BetaNews: You can now run Windows 95 on Windows, macOS, and Linux

BetaNews: You can now run Windows 95 on Windows, macOS, and Linux. “…if you want to actually try out the original again (or for the first time if you came into Windows more recently) you can do so by installing a new app that runs on Windows, macOS, or Linux. Created by Slack developer Felix Rieseberg, it’s available in the form of an electron app. Most things work exactly as you’d expect them to, including WordPad, FreeCell, Calculator and Media Player, although you can’t currently browse the web with Internet Explorer sadly. It opens but pages don’t load.”

Devdiscourse: UNESCO and Inria will open universal library of computer programme source codes

Devdiscourse: UNESCO and Inria will open universal library of computer programme source codes. “The Softwareheritage initiative aims to preserve and share the source codes of all software programmes that have been giving life to computers since the middle of last century. Over 4 billion unique source code files, including their successive iterations and more than 83 million software projects in all fields are already available from the online archive. UNESCO encourages universal access to information and the preservation of knowledge. The Charter on the Preservation of Digital Heritage, adopted in 2003, states that digital documents include, among a wide range of electronic formats, texts, databases, images, audio-documents and Web pages.”

Globe Newswire: Computer History Museum Makes the Eudora Email Client Source Code Available to the Public (PRESS RELEASE)

Globe Newswire: Computer History Museum Makes the Eudora Email Client Source Code Available to the Public (PRESS RELEASE). “Computer History Museum (CHM), the world’s leading institution exploring the history of computing and its impact on the human experience, today announced the public release and long-term preservation of the Eudora source code, one of the early successful email clients, as part of its Center for Software History’s Historical Source Code. The release comes after a five-year negotiation with Qualcomm. The first version of Eudora was created in the 1980s by Steve Dorner who was working at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. It took Dorner over a year to create the first version of Eudora, which had 50,000 lines of C code and ran only on the Apple Macintosh.” I miss Eudora a lot.

Nieman Lab: Here’s how The New York Times is trying to preserve millions of old pages the way they were originally published

Nieman Lab: Here’s how The New York Times is trying to preserve millions of old pages the way they were originally published. “Adobe is sunsetting the software, which powered so many early web games and videos, in December 2020; browsers like Chrome, Edge, and Safari have already choked off or limited support for Flash Player over the past few years. The fate of so many Flash games and interactives, absent proper guardians, is part of a broader problem: how to rescue work painstakingly built on now-outdated formats from the dustbin of internet history. It’s one The New York Times has been grappling with for its two decades of online content.”