Motherboard: The Geocities Archive Is Bringing the Early Internet to Life

Motherboard: The Geocities Archive Is Bringing the Early Internet to Life. “Geocities was one of the first places your average person could make a website for free. The Geocities Gallery aims to archive these sites and return them to functionality, MIDIs and all.”

Mashable: Yes, you can still visit Bob Dole’s 1996 campaign website. Here is its story.

Mashable: Yes, you can still visit Bob Dole’s 1996 campaign website. Here is its story. . “It’s Oct. 6, 1996. The night of the first presidential debate between President Bill Clinton and the Republican nominee, Bob Dole. Clinton is the young, popular incumbent who played the saxophone on The Arsenio Hall Show. Dole is a stiff conservative, who at 73 years old looks like he yells at kids to get off his lawn. But as the debate ends, right after he warns young people against doing drugs, Dole pulls off a first for a presidential candidate in the new internet era: he drops the URL of his campaign website, http://www.dolekemp96.org, on national TV.”

TechAeris: The Version Museum aims to show you the history of some of the internets most famous websites

New-to-me, possibly a relaunch? TechAeris: The Version Museum aims to show you the history of some of the internets most famous websites. “Many of us have been using the internet for 20+ years and over those years we’ve seen the internet grow. Websites have become cleaner and more aesthetically pleasing and load times have decreased to mere seconds. But sometimes we forget what the internet looked like and how different it is from today. That’s where the Version Museum comes in.”

OneZero: Meet the People Who Still Have AOL Email Addresses

OneZero: Meet the People Who Still Have AOL Email Addresses. “…despite the rise of broadband and free email, both AOL and EarthLink have somehow managed to survive. It’s difficult to get up-to-date figures, since the two entities are now subsidiaries and barely register as a blip on their parent companies’ balance sheets. Neither company would disclose its current number of monthly subscribers, but as of 2014, more than 2.1 million people still used AOL dial-up.” Obviously I do not use dial-up, but I still have a Mindspring account I’ve had since ~1998. That email address is in some of my books and such and I’m reluctant to get rid of it. I should at some point.

Lifehacker: How To Find Old Websites That Google Won’t Show

Lifehacker: How To Find Old Websites That Google Won’t Show. “As it turns out, they may only be lost to Google. Earlier this year, web developer-bloggers Tim Bray and Marco Fioretti noted that Google seems to have stopped indexing the entirety of the internet for Google Search. As a result, certain old websites — those more than 10 years old — did not show up through Google search. Both writers lamented that limiting Google’s effective memory to the last decade, while logical when faced with the daunting task of playing information concierge to our every whimsical question, forces us to reckon with the fact that, when you use Google for historical searches, there are probably more answers out there.” Decent roundup.

The World Wide Web Turns 30: Our Favorite Memories From A To Z (The Verge)

The Verge: The World Wide Web Turns 30: Our Favorite Memories From A To Z. “Over the past 30 years, major portions of the web have come and gone. They’ve made us laugh and cringe, let us waste time and find friends, and reshaped the world in the process. For its anniversary, we’re looking back at some of our favorite websites, from A to Z, as well as some key people and technologies. Of course, there was far too much good stuff to include, so we had to note some additional favorites along the way.”

Computerworld: National Library launches ‘enormous’ archive of Australia’s Internet

Computerworld: National Library launches ‘enormous’ archive of Australia’s Internet. “‘The Australian Web Archive [AWA] is one of the biggest in the world. And when we say big, we mean enormous,’ says director general of the National Library of Australia, Dr Marie-Louise Ayres. The new archive, which launched last week, contains around 600 terabytes of data across 9 billion records. In bookshelf terms; if the records were printed and stacked they would stretch from Canberra to Cairns.”