The World Wide Web Turns 30: Our Favorite Memories From A To Z (The Verge)

The Verge: The World Wide Web Turns 30: Our Favorite Memories From A To Z. “Over the past 30 years, major portions of the web have come and gone. They’ve made us laugh and cringe, let us waste time and find friends, and reshaped the world in the process. For its anniversary, we’re looking back at some of our favorite websites, from A to Z, as well as some key people and technologies. Of course, there was far too much good stuff to include, so we had to note some additional favorites along the way.”

Computerworld: National Library launches ‘enormous’ archive of Australia’s Internet

Computerworld: National Library launches ‘enormous’ archive of Australia’s Internet. “‘The Australian Web Archive [AWA] is one of the biggest in the world. And when we say big, we mean enormous,’ says director general of the National Library of Australia, Dr Marie-Louise Ayres. The new archive, which launched last week, contains around 600 terabytes of data across 9 billion records. In bookshelf terms; if the records were printed and stacked they would stretch from Canberra to Cairns.”

Ars Technica: How Hotmail changed Microsoft (and email) forever

A good read for us old people: How Hotmail changed Microsoft (and email) forever. “Twenty years ago this week, on December 29, 1997, Bill Gates bought Microsoft a $450 million late Christmas present: a Sunnyvale-based outfit called Hotmail. With the buy—the largest all-cash Internet startup purchase of its day—Microsoft plunged into the nascent world of Web-based email. Originally launched in 1996 by Jack Smith and Sabeer Bhatia as ‘HoTMaiL’ (referencing HTML, the language of the World Wide Web), Hotmail was initially folded into Microsoft’s MSN online service. Mistakes were made. Many dollars were spent. Branding was changed. Spam became legion. Many, many horrendous email signatures were spawned.”

Engadget: CompuServe’s still-active forums are finally shutting down

Engadget: CompuServe’s still-active forums are finally shutting down. “It turns out that Instant Messenger (AIM) isn’t the only thing that AOL is shutting down next month. On December 15th, Oath (AOL and Engadget’s dear parent) is also closing what remains of the CompuServe forums which, yes, still actually exist. CompuServe had the first ever mainstream online forums well before the internet came along, letting users connect to its central servers via old-school dial-up modems. You can credit (or blame) the company for allowing some of the first online group chats about subjects like investing, politics and religion.” Why yes, I am old enough to remember the squeal of a 1200 baud modem — and a 300 baud modem!

Internet Archive: Wayback Machine Playback… now with Timestamps!

Internet Archive: Wayback Machine Playback… now with Timestamps!. “The Wayback Machine has an exciting new feature: it can list the dates and times, the Timestamps, of all page elements compared to the date and time of the base URL of a page. This means that users can see, for instance, that an image displayed on a page was captured X days before the URL of the page or Y hours after it. Timestamps are available via the ‘About this capture’ link on the right side of the Wayback Toolbar. “

CNET: AOL’s AIM sets its away message… permanently

And in our “Man-do-I-feel-old,” department, from CNET: AOL’s AIM sets its away message… permanently. “AOL Instant Messenger, a popular form of communication in the early days of the internet, goes dark on Dec. 15, AOL, now a unit of Verizon’s Oath, said on Friday. AIM was once one of the dominant instant-messaging platforms on the internet, helped by the massive number of dialup subscribers using AOL internet service. After launching in 1997, it enjoyed its peak in the late ’90s and early 2000s.”

Vice: I Bought a Book About the Internet From 1994 and None of the Links Worked

With a tip o’ the nib to John S, from Vice: I Bought a Book About the Internet From 1994 and None of the Links Worked. “The endless pace of linkrot has left books about the internet in a curious limbo—they’re dead trees about the dead-tree killer, after all. To their credit, books about the internet carry a bit of permanence about them, but they also go out of date quickly, which isn’t helpful. But for my purposes, that’s a virtue.”