Washington Post: Covid-19 pandemic is stoking extremist flames worldwide, analysts warn

Washington Post: Covid-19 pandemic is stoking extremist flames worldwide, analysts warn. “Across the globe, violence has emerged a major and persistent side effect of the pandemic that has stricken 12 million people and killed more than 550,000. Even as it overwhelms hospitals, covid-19 is also straining security forces in scores of countries, exacerbating long-standing conflicts while fueling grievances and spurring the growth of extremist groups, security officials and analysts say in a series of new studies and interviews.”

The Verge: Coronavirus email hoax led to violent protests in Ukraine

The Verge: Coronavirus email hoax led to violent protests in Ukraine. “The email originated from outside Ukraine, according to a government statement, and it falsely claimed there were five cases of coronavirus in the country. In reality, there have been zero reported cases of the virus in Ukraine. But the email was sent the same day evacuees from China landed in the country, and some Ukranian residents protested the evacuees’ arrival by blocking roads that led to medical facilities and, in some cases, by smashing the windows of the buses carrying those evacuees.”

Diverse: New Website Tracks School Police Violence Against Students of Color

Diverse: New Website Tracks School Police Violence Against Students of Color. “The website also has an interactive map called the #AssaultAt map, which shows where alleged police attacks on students occurred from 2009 to present. So far, the website documents 110 incidents. Visitors can click pins on the map to learn more about each story, including photos and videos when available.”

Poynter: Misinformation is inciting violence around the world. And tech platforms don’t seem to have a plan to stop it.

Poynter: Misinformation is inciting violence around the world. And tech platforms don’t seem to have a plan to stop it.. “On Monday, French police arrested 20 people accused of attacking Roma people in the suburbs of Paris. In one attack, about 50 people armed with sticks and knives attacked Roma living in a slum and set fire to their cars. The Guardian reported that the attacks occurred following the re-emergence of an old online hoax that warns people about white vans that are being used to kidnap women and children — a false claim that has roots in medieval stereotypes about the Roma. Interestingly, the misinformation spread on both Facebook and Snapchat; the latter has mostly escaped scrutiny for its role in spreading bogus claims.”

USC Viterbi: Using Artificial Intelligence to Predict Violence in Movies

USC Viterbi: Using Artificial Intelligence to Predict Violence in Movies. “For many in the film industry, seeing your film landed with an NC-17 rating from the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) is the kiss of death. With your film no longer accessible to viewers under 17, you are presented with a choice between limited box-office takings or expensive re-editing, or even reshooting, to meet the requirements of a more palatable R rating. But what if there were a more accurate way to determine a film’s likely classification at the script stage, before it moves through the expensive process of production and post-production?”

Dayton Daily News: Gov. Kasich signs bill to set up Ohio violent offender registry

Dayton Daily News: Gov. Kasich signs bill to set up Ohio violent offender registry. “Violent offenders will need to self-register — and annually re-register for a decade — under a bill signed Wednesday by Gov. John Kasich that will establish a database of Ohio’s released murderers and kidnappers.”

Nipples Are Banned, but Animal Abuse and Brutal Violence Are OK: Instagram Is Broken (Fstoppers)

Fstoppers: Nipples Are Banned, but Animal Abuse and Brutal Violence Are OK: Instagram Is Broken. “As a photographer absorbed with curating my profile and admiring the work of some amazing artists, it’s not always apparent how much of Instagram is filled with truly terrible things. I’ve written before about how Instagram is a cesspit of populist content that is driven by clicks as opposed to quality. I’ve also complained at length about Instagram’s clear reluctance to combat freebooting on its platform, happy to see content stolen as long as users stay in the app, consuming its adverts. What I failed to realize was how much of Instagram is violent, graphic, and seemingly free of moderation. Around the world, thousands of 13-year-olds will be receiving new electronic devices this Christmas, many of them no doubt opening new Instagram accounts. Terrifyingly, those children, with all the parental controls in place, could in just a few clicks be watching footage of animals being abused, or, as I just discovered, people being executed. In [Mason] Gentry’s experience, reporting this content seems to make little difference.”

BuzzFeed News: The Conspiratorial Hate We See Online Is Increasingly Appearing In Real Life

BuzzFeed News: The Conspiratorial Hate We See Online Is Increasingly Appearing In Real Life. “Connecting the online footprints to tragedies in the physical world also reveals an undeniable truth: that the dichotomy between an online world and ‘real life’ is (and has always been) a false one. The hatred, trolling, harassment, and conspiracy theorizing of the internet’s underbelly cannot be dismissed as empty, nihilistic performance. It may be a game, but it’s a game with consequences. And it’s spilling into the physical world with greater, more alarming frequency.”

Nevada Today: Professor uses Twitter data to compare real-time violence with tweets

Nevada Today: Professor uses Twitter data to compare real-time violence with tweets. “University of Nevada, Reno Political Science Assistant Professor Steven Wilson downloads six million tweets a day from across the globe to identify how people communicate with one another. He has been downloading geocoded tweets since 2012 from everywhere except North America and western Europe. He uses custom software to figure out the exact location of tweets, which are accurate within two meters. He uses this data to look at political and social trends, help identify violence and how political regimes may benefit from listening to citizens.”

Understanding Conflictuality in Lebanon: #DataforChange (Lebanon Support)

Lebanon Support: Understanding Conflictuality in Lebanon: #DataforChange. “The Conflict Analysis Project… within Lebanon Support’s Civil Society Knowledge Centre, aims at understanding contemporary conflict dynamics and actors in Lebanon, in order to better comprehend their root causes and inform interventions and policy-making. As part of this project, in partnership with the UNDP, Lebanon Support has developed new interactive mappings which provide data and information on the various dimensions of conflictuality in Lebanon, including security operations, mobilisations, and policy decisions: This data serves as a tool for civil society actors, policy makers, and researchers, to produce evidence-based analysis on conflictuality in Lebanon, leading to better tailored interventions on conflict transformation and peace-building.”

Voice of America News: Initiative Puts Human Face on Afghan Violence

Voice of America News: Initiative Puts Human Face on Afghan Violence. “Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organization, a Kabul-based rights group, plans to exhibit mementos of war victims in several European countries in coming months. The group launched the initiative, named Memory Box, in 2011 with the aim of putting a human face on the ongoing violence in Afghanistan….In the meantime, the organization plans to launch an online museum. Work on the virtual museum is in its final stages and will soon launch make the stories of war victims available to anyone with an Internet connection.”

Institute of Development Studies: New online hub focuses on countering violent extremism in Kenya

Institute of Development Studies: New online hub focuses on countering violent extremism in Kenya. “Launched today in Nairobi, a new online hub focusing on Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) in Kenya hopes to connect researchers, practitioners and policymakers. The Countering Violent Extremism Research Hub, a collaboration between the Centre for Human Rights and Policy Studies (CHRIPS) and the Institute of Development Studies, will collect CVE resources in an online library to support high-quality research, exchange of ideas and a multi-sector network.”

Mashable: Facebook bans Myanmar military commander for inciting violence

Mashable: Facebook bans Myanmar military commander for inciting violence. “Facebook has just removed a number of Facebook pages belonging to individuals and groups in Myanmar for spreading hate speech and fake news against Rohingya Muslims in the country. In a post titled ‘Removing Myanmar Military Officials From Facebook’ on its Newsroom site, Facebook announced it had removed 52 Pages,18 accounts, and an Instagram profile related to spreading the type of misinformation used to incite violence and ethnic cleansing in Myanmar. “

TechCrunch: Study ties Facebook engagement to attacks on refugees

TechCrunch: Study ties Facebook engagement to attacks on refugees. “A study of circumstances and demographics attendant on attacks against refugees and immigrants in Germany has shown that Facebook use appears to be deeply linked with the frequency of violent acts. Far from being mere trolling or isolated expressions of controversial political opinions, spikes in anti-refugee posts were predictive of violent crimes against those groups.”

Phys .org: Are US cities getting more or less violent? New database offers mixed picture

Phys .org: Are US cities getting more or less violent? New database offers mixed picture . “Violence has fallen in nearly all major U.S. cities since 1991, according to a new analysis by researchers at New York University. However, recent fluctuations in violence in selected cities point to temporary disruptions in this 17-year decline.”