Mashable: Instagram can’t stop flood of grisly photos from teen’s murder so users step up

Mashable: Instagram can’t stop flood of grisly photos from teen’s murder so users step up. “Instagram users are stepping up to stanch the flow of photos showing a popular teen e-girl’s murder as the platform fails to quickly remove the images. As bad actors upload grisly photos showing the teen’s slit neck with certain hashtags, some users are working to bury those posts under images of pink clouds and cats wearing flower crowns with those same hashtags and tagging the victim’s account. The inventive approach makes it harder to search for pictures of Bianca Devins’ dead body.”

Bianca Devins: Photos of Utica Teen’s Body Posted on Instagram After Murder (Heavy)

Heavy: Bianca Devins: Photos of Utica Teen’s Body Posted on Instagram After Murder. “Bianca Devins was a 17-year-old girl from Utica, New York, who was murdered on July 14. Photos of Bianca’s body were posted on social media after her death by the suspected killer, a 21-year-old New York man identified by his family as Brandon Clark, who also goes by Brandon Kuwaliski. Heavy is not publishing the gruesome photos posted to Instagram or linking to them. The photos remained on Clark’s Instagram page for several hours before they were removed.”

The Verge: Twitch is closing in on its Christchurch trolls

The Verge: Twitch is closing in on its Christchurch trolls. “For just over a month, Twitch has been trying to track down a group of anonymous trolls who spammed the platform with violent footage of the Christchurch shooting in the wake of the attack. That hunt kicked off in earnest when Twitch filed suit against the trolls earlier in June, but new filings show the company has more clues to the perpetrators’ identity than anyone suspected, including specific email addresses for at least three people and Discord logs where the attack was organized.”

The Verge: Bodies in Seats

The Verge: Bodies in Seats . “In May, I traveled to Florida to meet with these Facebook contractors. This article is based on interviews with 12 current and former moderators and managers at the Tampa site. In most cases, I agreed to use pseudonyms to protect the employees from potential retaliation from Facebook and Cognizant. But for the first time, three former moderators for Facebook in North America agreed to break their nondisclosure agreements and discuss working conditions at the site on the record.” I want you to read this article. At the same time I don’t want you to read this article because just reading it made me nauseated.

Tubefilter: Twitch Suing 100 Users Who Spammed ‘Artifact’ Game Category With Pornographic And Violent Content

Tubefilter: Twitch Suing 100 Users Who Spammed ‘Artifact’ Game Category With Pornographic And Violent Content. “Twitch is suing 100 people for flooding its site with pornography, gore, and graphic imagery, including livestreams of the Christchurch massacre footage. There’s only one problem: the Amazon-owned platform has no idea who these 100 people are.”

New York Times: Facebook’s A.I. Whiz Now Faces the Task of Cleaning It Up. Sometimes That Brings Him to Tears.

New York Times: Facebook’s A.I. Whiz Now Faces the Task of Cleaning It Up. Sometimes That Brings Him to Tears.. “Mike Schroepfer, Facebook’s chief technology officer, was tearing up. For half an hour, we had been sitting in a conference room at Facebook’s headquarters, surrounded by whiteboards covered in blue and red marker, discussing the technical difficulties of removing toxic content from the social network. Then we brought up an episode where the challenges had proved insurmountable: the shootings in Christchurch, New Zealand.”

CNN: Seven weeks later, videos of New Zealand attack still circulating on Facebook and Instagram

CNN: Seven weeks later, videos of New Zealand attack still circulating on Facebook and Instagram. “Almost seven weeks after a terrorist attack on a New Zealand mosque was streamed live on Facebook, copies of the video are still circulating on Facebook and Instagram. The existence of the videos, some of which have been on the platforms since the day of the attack, are indicative of the challenge tech companies face in combating the spread of white supremacist and other terror-related content on their platforms and raises questions about the effectiveness of Facebook’s efforts to do so in particular.”