The Next Web: The only way to stop fake news is for you to take responsibility

The Next Web: The only way to stop fake news is for you to take responsibility. “The nature of the media has changed, and for better or worse they now chiefly operate to survive to attract readers, and we are those readers. If we want to see an end to fake news, we need to stop clicking on it, and stop spreading it. Our click is worth money. You’ve probably heard the phrase ‘vote with your dollar’ applied to things like purchasing fair trade items. But you can, and do, vote with your clicks, too.”

Ars Technica: Information overload study we covered has been retracted

Ars Technica: Information overload study we covered has been retracted. “In 2017, we covered a study that suggested information overload may be responsible for the viral spread of faulty information. The study was based on a mix of modeling of artificial ‘agents’ that forwarded information to their peers, and real-world data obtained from Twitter. In attempting to follow up on their own work, the researchers who produced it discovered two problems: a software bug in their analysis pipeline, and a graph that was produced using invalid data.”

BuzzFeed News: These Are 50 Of The Biggest Fake News Hits On Facebook In 2018

BuzzFeed News: These Are 50 Of The Biggest Fake News Hits On Facebook In 2018. “For the third year in a row, BuzzFeed News compiled a list of 50 of the most viral false stories on Facebook and measured their total engagement on the platform. And in spite of a prediction from Facebook’s top anti-misinformation product manager that these articles would see a decline in engagement in 2018, this year’s top-performing hoaxes generated almost as many shares, reactions, and comments as last year’s.”

Poynter: How do you make fact-checking viral? Make it look like misinformation.

Poynter: How do you make fact-checking viral? Make it look like misinformation.. “We decided to copy the ‘bad guys’ in order to fight back. We decided to debunk hoaxes in the same format of the hoaxes that had proven so effective at reaching citizens. We decided to try to make the facts as viral as the lies. And it worked. To date, the most critical time for disinformation in Spain were the days between the Catalonian consultation of Oct. 1, 2017, and the election that took place two months later — and it was then that we tested our proposition. We posted the results of our fact-checking directly on social media as images that could be easily downloaded and shared. Just like disinformation. We don’t depend financially on advertising so we don’t need our readers to come to our website.”

New York Times: How Do You Recover After Millions Have Watched You Overdose?

New York Times: How Do You Recover After Millions Have Watched You Overdose?. “The first time Kelmae Hemphill watched herself overdose, she sobbed. There she was in a shaky video filmed by her own heroin dealer, sprawled out on a New Jersey road while a stranger pounded on her chest. ‘Come on, girl,’ someone pleaded. Ms. Hemphill’s 11-year drug addiction, her criminal record, her struggles as a mother — they were now everybody’s business, splashed across the news and social media with a new genre of American horror film: the overdose video.”

Boing Boing: This is what ‘going viral’ looks like

Boing Boing: This is what ‘going viral’ looks like. “…on November 11, I blogged about Tim Klein’s ‘puzzle montages’ and I believe it’s the most-viral post I’ve written in my over-seven-year professional blogging career. While I don’t have the exact numbers, I have been watching it quickly spread across the planet and I feel certain that it is. Today, I thought it would be fun to pull back the curtain a little to show you what ‘going viral’ looks like from ‘backstage.'”

Wired: The Infinite Lifespan Of Memes

Wired: The Infinite Lifespan Of Memes. “A comic primed for the social media age, Busco (born Brandon Moore) lived a quotidian life that took on prodigious proportions online, regularly broadcasting moments of mundanity and side-splitting farce to his 50,000 Instagram followers. In 2015 Moore struck viral gold.”