The Atlantic: Momo Is Not Trying to Kill Children

The Atlantic: Momo Is Not Trying to Kill Children. “To any concerned parents reading this: Do not worry. The ‘Momo challenge’ is a recurring viral hoax that has been perpetuated by local news stations and scared parents around the world. This entire cycle of shock, terror, and outrage about Momo even took place before, less than a year ago: Last summer, local news outlets across the country reported that the Momo challenge was spreading among teens via WhatsApp. Previously, rumors about the challenge spread throughout Latin America and Spanish-speaking countries.”

CNN: Russia is backing a viral video company aimed at American millennials

CNN: Russia is backing a viral video company aimed at American millennials. “Three online video channels designed to appeal to millennials have collected tens of millions of views on Facebook since September. But the pages pushing the videos do not disclose that they are backed by the Russian government. The pages are run by Maffick Media, a company whose majority stakeholder is Ruptly, a subsidiary of RT, which is funded by the Russian government. Although Maffick Media has hired contractors and freelancers in Los Angeles in recent months, the company is not registered in the US, it is registered in Germany.”

Twitter after high-profile events: how language impacts message engagement (Nevada Today)

Nevada Today: Twitter after high-profile events: how language impacts message engagement . “Using real-world Twitter and experimental data based on high-profile events, researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno; Tulane University, and the University of Texas at Austin, found that heightened causal uncertainty increases individuals’ liking and sharing of messages that consist of more abstract (versus concrete) language.”

The Next Web: The only way to stop fake news is for you to take responsibility

The Next Web: The only way to stop fake news is for you to take responsibility. “The nature of the media has changed, and for better or worse they now chiefly operate to survive to attract readers, and we are those readers. If we want to see an end to fake news, we need to stop clicking on it, and stop spreading it. Our click is worth money. You’ve probably heard the phrase ‘vote with your dollar’ applied to things like purchasing fair trade items. But you can, and do, vote with your clicks, too.”

Ars Technica: Information overload study we covered has been retracted

Ars Technica: Information overload study we covered has been retracted. “In 2017, we covered a study that suggested information overload may be responsible for the viral spread of faulty information. The study was based on a mix of modeling of artificial ‘agents’ that forwarded information to their peers, and real-world data obtained from Twitter. In attempting to follow up on their own work, the researchers who produced it discovered two problems: a software bug in their analysis pipeline, and a graph that was produced using invalid data.”

BuzzFeed News: These Are 50 Of The Biggest Fake News Hits On Facebook In 2018

BuzzFeed News: These Are 50 Of The Biggest Fake News Hits On Facebook In 2018. “For the third year in a row, BuzzFeed News compiled a list of 50 of the most viral false stories on Facebook and measured their total engagement on the platform. And in spite of a prediction from Facebook’s top anti-misinformation product manager that these articles would see a decline in engagement in 2018, this year’s top-performing hoaxes generated almost as many shares, reactions, and comments as last year’s.”

Poynter: How do you make fact-checking viral? Make it look like misinformation.

Poynter: How do you make fact-checking viral? Make it look like misinformation.. “We decided to copy the ‘bad guys’ in order to fight back. We decided to debunk hoaxes in the same format of the hoaxes that had proven so effective at reaching citizens. We decided to try to make the facts as viral as the lies. And it worked. To date, the most critical time for disinformation in Spain were the days between the Catalonian consultation of Oct. 1, 2017, and the election that took place two months later — and it was then that we tested our proposition. We posted the results of our fact-checking directly on social media as images that could be easily downloaded and shared. Just like disinformation. We don’t depend financially on advertising so we don’t need our readers to come to our website.”