Poynter: An examination of a viral YouTube video reveals a cautionary tale for the news media

Poynter: An examination of a viral YouTube video reveals a cautionary tale for the news media. “I’m obsessed with the plight of the YouTube content creator. Anyone who works with audiences or analytics in any form and in any industry should be. Consider this: Millions of people create work for YouTube every day. Their output is probably the largest on the internet. And many of them are incredibly entrepreneurial, tracking changes in consumer tastes and algorithm biases and responding to them in real time. For anyone who produces work that is published online, YouTube is a petri dish that we can use to study our own work.”

New York Intelligencer: Five Signs a Viral Story Is Fake

New York Intelligencer: Five Signs a Viral Story Is Fake. “The benefit to stories like these popping up so frequently is that they become easier to spot. Once you know the formula, it’s hard to read past a tweet or two before checking out, knowing full well what you’re reading is just fiction. And not particularly nuanced fiction at that. Here’s a checklist for what you should be keeping an eye out for.”

EurekAlert: The hidden secrets of creating a viral YouTube ad

EurekAlert: The hidden secrets of creating a viral YouTube ad. “The research team tested five hypotheses about what drives sharing of video ads across social media, using two independent field studies that analyzed 11 measures of emotion and over 60 ad characteristics. The study included 109 brands that were among the top 100 US advertisers in 2012 as well as additional brands that were historically active on YouTube.”

The Ohio State University: Tech fixes can’t protect us from disinformation campaigns

The Ohio State University: Tech fixes can’t protect us from disinformation campaigns. “More than technological fixes are needed to stop countries from spreading disinformation on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, according to two experts. Policymakers and diplomats need to focus more on the psychology behind why citizens are so vulnerable to disinformation campaigns, said Erik Nisbet and Olga Kamenchuk of The Ohio State University.”

CNBC: Facebook is taking a page out of Google’s playbook to stop fake news from going viral

CNBC: Facebook is taking a page out of Google’s playbook to stop fake news from going viral. “The social media company said it will use a new approach called Click-Gap to reduce the amount of low-quality content, such as fake news, that users see on News Feed. For this, Facebook is crawling and indexing the entire internet to identify and web sites that receive a disproportionate amount of their traffic from the social network. Then, it will lower the prominence of posts from these sites.”

Physics: Explaining Bursts of Attention on Social Media

Physics: Explaining Bursts of Attention on Social Media. “Social media are like a giant megaphone for public opinion: they can sway elections, crush a business, or incite mass action on hot-button issues like vaccination and climate change. Researchers studying how a topic grabs ‘collective attention’ have noticed a common feature in social media data: occasional short and seemingly random bursts of high-volume activity. These poorly understood ‘spikes’ are an intrinsic aspect of attention dynamics, says Manlio De Domenico, a network theorist at the Bruno Kessler Foundation (FBK) in Trento, Italy.”

Fatherly: What Momo and Condom Snorting Teach Us About Internet Hoaxes

Fatherly: What Momo and Condom Snorting Teach Us About Internet Hoaxes. “Condom snorting enjoyed some prominence on the Internet over the years, with one or two videos of wayward teens sucking prophylactics up their nasal passageways and, inevitably, immediately regretting their choice. A 2013 video by Youtuber Amber-Lynn Strong has more than two million views and was covered on prominent media sites like Buzzfeed. And then, the once-viral trend went silent until 2018, when it was resurrected, like a zombie, into relevance.”