Daily News-Record: Library of Virginia Creates A Digital Map Of Virginia’s Deaf Communities

Daily News-Record: Library of Virginia Creates A Digital Map Of Virginia’s Deaf Communities. “The Library of Virginia added a digital map resource to Virginia’s Deaf Culture Digital Library, a website with information for the commonwealth’s deaf community created by the library in collaboration with Central Rappahannock Regional Library, a press release announced.”

Gloucester-Mathews Gazette-Journal: Digital archive tells story of Gloucester A&I

Gloucester-Mathews Gazette-Journal: Digital archive tells story of Gloucester A&I. “The documents shed light on the founding and early days of the Gloucester Agricultural and Industrial School, also known as the Cappahosic Academy. That school, which operated from 1888 until its closing in 1933, provided the Black youth of Gloucester and surrounding communities with much more than the basic skills and training needed to be a laborer.”

Northern Virginia Daily: Belle Grove online exhibit

Northern Virginia Daily: Belle Grove online exhibit. “Belle Grove has published its latest online exhibit …, The Jackson Family: A Story of Resilience & The Enduring Love of Family. It tells the story of Emanuel Jackson, a free Black man from Frederick County and how he purchased the freedom of his children and grandchild who were enslaved by the Hite family. Jackson resided in Pittsburgh and his children joined him there.”

Loudoun Now: Morven Park’s 246 Years Project Expands Access to Enslaved Family History

Loudoun Now (Virginia): Morven Park’s 246 Years Project Expands Access to Enslaved Family History. “The 246 Years Project is an initiative of Morven Park and Loudoun County Circuit Court Clerk Gary Clemens and his Historic Records Division team. Morven Park is building an online database organizing fragmentary information about Loudoun’s enslaved communities, allowing descendants to delve deeper into their family histories.”

CNET: A Virtual Tour Uncovers the Hidden History of Black Disenfranchisement

CNET: A Virtual Tour Uncovers the Hidden History of Black Disenfranchisement. “[Old Lick Cemetery]’s disturbing story would likely remain a footnote in the city’s history were it not for a project called Hidden in Plain Site, the brainchild of creative agency BrownBaylor. It’s designed to resurface the lost narrative of marginalized Black people across the US with experiences you can view through a browser or virtual reality headset.”

WWBT: Conservators recover books, coins, ammo from 1887 time capsule

WWBT: Conservators recover books, coins, ammo from 1887 time capsule. “A portion of Richmond’s history was uncovered by a team of conservators at the Department of Historic Resources as they opened a copper box confirmed as the time capsule placed in the very Northeast corner of the Robert E. Lee monument on Oct. 27, 1887. On Tuesday afternoon, conservators finished opening the 36-pound copper box in their conservation lab. State Archaeological Conservator Kate Ridgway said they used a tool to cut open the top of the box and put blotter paper inside the box to reduce the water condensation.”

CBS News: Crews find second potential time capsule at Virginia’s Robert E. Lee statue site

CBS News: Crews find second potential time capsule at Virginia’s Robert E. Lee statue site. “Crews wrapping up the removal Monday of a giant pedestal that once held a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee in Richmond found what appeared to be a second and long-sought-after time capsule, Virginia Governor Ralph Northam said.” The second capsule will be opened at 1pm today (Tuesday).

‘Local Black Histories:’ New virtual project tells untold stories of Greater Williamsburg area (13 News Now)

13 News Now (Virginia): ‘Local Black Histories:’ New virtual project tells untold stories of Greater Williamsburg area. “A new, interactive platform uncovers the rich history of the Black community in the Greater Williamsburg area. The Local Black Histories Project launched Sunday. The project is spearheaded by the Village Initiative for Education Equity, a non-profit focusing on equity in education. The College of William & Mary and Williamsburg-James City County are also partners.”

Virginia Commonwealth University: New digital project explores the life and legacy of James Branch Cabell, namesake of VCU’s library

Virginia Commonwealth University: New digital project explores the life and legacy of James Branch Cabell, namesake of VCU’s library. “VCU Libraries has launched a digital hub focused on the literary work, impact and life of Richmond writer James Branch Cabell (1879-1958), who was the author of 52 works of fiction and nonfiction and is the namesake of Virginia Commonwealth University’s library on the Monroe Park Campus.”

Governor of Virginia: Governor Northam Announces Artifacts for New Time Capsule

Governor of Virginia: Governor Northam Announces Artifacts for New Time Capsule. “Governor Ralph Northam today announced the artifacts for the new time capsule, crafted by Richmond sculptor Paul DiPasquale. The capsule will be placed in the concrete pedestal of Richmond’s Lee Monument. Historians believe a copper time capsule was placed in the cornerstone of the Lee pedestal on October 27, 1887…. The statue itself will be removed on Wednesday. On Thursday, the original time capsule will be removed and handed over to the Department of Historic Resources.”

Daily Press: ‘The collection has become its own collection’: Pamunkey Museum director plans to restore, revitalize center

Daily Press: ‘The collection has become its own collection’: Pamunkey Museum director plans to restore, revitalize center. “Step into the Pamunkey Indian Museum, located at the tribe’s reservation in King William, and each artifact will transport you to a different age. Stone points dating 12,000 years ago. A treaty from 1677 between several tribes and the English crown, guaranteeing the indigenous members control over their homeland. Ceremonial headwear and dresses worn in the 1930s. But the museum’s timeline, depicting traditional pottery styles through the Pamunkey’s history, stops in 1980.”

Virginia Gazette: Library wants help finding the faces in the photos of Williamsburg’s first licensed African American photographer

Virginia Gazette: Library wants help finding the faces in the photos of Williamsburg’s first licensed African American photographer. “[Albert] Durant, the first-licensed African American photographer in Williamsburg, photographed life in the area from the late 1930s to the 1960s. Durant documented life from an African American perspective, photographing many sporting, social, school and city events during that time. Now, John D. Rockefeller Jr. Library is hoping to fill in some of the blanks in Durant’s photographs. The library is working with the Library of Virginia to provide a digital collection of Durant’s photographs for the public to transcribe.” Currently about 100 photos are available with more on the way.

Inside NoVa: Vintage Arlington newspapers digitized, placed online

Inside NoVa: Vintage Arlington newspapers digitized, placed online. “As part of a partnership that includes the Library of Virginia, the Center for Local History of the Arlington library system and the Sun Gazette, archive materials from a number of Arlington newspapers can now be found online. Editions of the Northern Virginia Sun from 1935 to 1978 have been digitized and made available through the Virginia Chronicle, a free online resource tool. Copies of the Columbia News also were digitized as part of the effort.”

Cavalier Daily: Law School launches new website exploring its connections to slavery

Cavalier Daily: Law School launches new website exploring its connections to slavery. “The University’s Law school launched Slavery and the U.Va. School of Law — a new website and digital archive that explores the law school’s historical connections to slavery — on Feb 1. At the core of this project are digitized versions of law students’ notebooks from the antebellum time period, when slavery was taught as a social good.”