FamilyOFive: YouTube bans ‘pranksters’ after child abuse conviction (The Guardian)

The Guardian: FamilyOFive: YouTube bans ‘pranksters’ after child abuse conviction. “YouTube has banned a family of vloggers from its platform, after the parents were convicted of child neglect in the course of filming their popular ‘prank’ videos. Michael and Heather Martin,who post videos under the name FamilyOFive, were , after viewers raised alarm over their treatment of their children in videos.”

The Verge: Strict new internet laws in Tanzania are driving bloggers and content creators offline

The Verge: Strict new internet laws in Tanzania are driving bloggers and content creators offline. “In May, Tanzanian bloggers lost an appeal that had temporarily suspended a new set of regulations granting the country’s Communication Regulatory Authority discretionary powers to censor online content. Officially dubbed the Electronic and Postal Communications (Online Content) Regulations, 2018, the statute, which the Tanzanian government is counting among its efforts to curb hate speech and fake news, requires online content creators — traditional media websites, online TV and radio channels, but also individual bloggers and podcasters — to pay roughly two million Tanzanian shillings (930 US dollars) in registration and licensing fees.”

Tubefilter: Highlights From YouTube Onstage (And The Rest Of VidCon) Are Available On YouTube

Tubefilter: Highlights From YouTube Onstage (And The Rest Of VidCon) Are Available On YouTube. “If you weren’t able to attend VidCon this year, you missed out on another year of keynotes, panels, and performances featuring the top stars of the online video industry. While those festivities have now concluded, some of them are currently available for on-demand consumption. On the VidCon YouTube channel, you can find videos from several of this year’s events, including a few highlights from the YouTube Onstage performance, which brought together some of the internet’s most notable names for an entertaining variety show.”

Minneapolis Star-Tribune: Girlfriend cried, pleaded for end to fatal YouTube stunt, video and transcripts show

Minneapolis Star-Tribune: Girlfriend cried, pleaded for end to fatal YouTube stunt, video and transcripts show. “A pregnant Monalisa Perez cried and pleaded with her boyfriend several times to put a stop to a YouTube stunt, but the man urged her on, eventually dying after she fired a gun at him as he held an encyclopedia in front of his chest.” … and she got six months in jail.

The Atlantic: Gambling Channels Are the Latest Victims of YouTube’s Arbitrary Moderation Process

The Atlantic: Gambling Channels Are the Latest Victims of YouTube’s Arbitrary Moderation Process. “Days before he was set to begin a month-long promotional tour for his YouTube channel, Brian Christopher learned that his account had been abruptly terminated. In the two years since Christopher has been running BrianChristopherSlots, he’s produced more than 1,100 vlogs of himself gambling, mostly on slot machines, and racked up 50 million views and 80,000 subscribers. But then, last week, his account was suspended, along with many other prominent YouTube gambling channels. In an email, YouTube explained the suspension was due to ‘repeated or severe violations’ of its community guidelines, which prohibit ‘violent or dangerous acts that have an inherent risk of serious physical harm or death.’ (YouTube did not respond to requests for comment from The Atlantic.)” I am not a fan of gambling but this is nuts.

Polygon: YouTube’s top creators are burning out and breaking down en masse

Polygon: YouTube’s top creators are burning out and breaking down en masse. “Three weeks ago, Bobby Burns, a YouTuber with just under one million subscribers, sat down on a rock in Central Park to talk about a recent mental health episode. One week ago, Elle Mills, a creator with more than 1.2 million subscribers, uploaded a video that included vulnerable footage during a breakdown. Six days ago, Rubén ‘El Rubius’ Gundersen, the third most popular YouTuber in the world with just under 30 million subscribers, turned on his camera to talk to his viewers about the fear of an impending breakdown and his decision to take a break from YouTube.”

EurekAlert: Research highlights the influence social media marketing has on children’s food intake

EurekAlert: Research highlights the influence social media marketing has on children’s food intake . “New research from the University of Liverpool, presented at the European Congress on Obesity today (Wednesday, 23 May), highlights the negative influence that social media has on children’s food intake. Current research shows celebrity endorsement and television advertising of unhealthy foods increases children’s intake of these foods. However, children are increasingly exposed to marketing through digital avenues, such as on social media, and the impact of marketing by YouTube video bloggers (vloggers) on these outcomes has, until now, not been known.”