Hold the Front Page: Former editor creates dictionary of “lost language of newspapers”

Hold the Front Page: Former editor creates dictionary of “lost language of newspapers”. “Neil Benson has created a glossary of both current and extinct newspaper production terms after launching an appeal on Facebook for journalists to contribute to it. The glossary features dozens of terms used throughout the newspaper industry’s history and has been widely shared since being published on his blog.”

Engadget: Merriam-Webster just yeeted a bunch of internet slang into the dictionary

Engadget: Merriam-Webster just yeeted a bunch of internet slang into the dictionary. “The list of new words includes additions that clearly illustrate how these past years have gone for everyone. ‘Booster dose,’ which became a commonly uttered phrase because of the pandemic, gets its own Merriam-Webster page, so do ‘false positive’ and ‘false negative’ lab test results.”

NiemanLab: Lost for words? A new, free resource offers journalists guidance on thorny topics

NiemanLab: Lost for words? A new, free resource offers journalists guidance on thorny topics. “Using funding from Google News Initiative, the project brought together a long list of news leaders to write a style guide with more than 275 entries — including ones for ‘crisis pregnancy center,’ ‘opportunity gap,’ and ‘DREAMer’ — containing detailed definitions, notes on usage, and additional resources.”

The Verge: The Linguistics Search Engine That Overturned The Federal Mask Mandate

The Verge: The Linguistics Search Engine That Overturned The Federal Mask Mandate. “Using corpora to answer legal questions, a strategy often referred to as legal corpus linguistics, has grown increasingly popular in some legal circles within the past decade. It’s been used by judges on the Michigan Supreme Court and the Utah Supreme Court, and, this past March, was referenced by the US Supreme Court during oral arguments for the first time.”

New York Times: The War in Ukraine Has Unleashed a New Word

New York Times: The War in Ukraine Has Unleashed a New Word. “‘Pашизм’ is a word built up from the inside, from several languages, as a complex of puns and references that reveal a bilingual society thinking out its predicament and communicating to itself. Its emergence demonstrates how a code-switching people can enrich language while making a horrific war more intelligible to themselves. Putin’s ethnic imperialism insists that Ukrainians must be Russians because they speak Russian. They do — and they speak Ukrainian. But Ukrainian identity has as much to do with an ability to live between languages than it does with the use of any one of them.”

Mozilla Blog: A glossary of terms about cyberattacks, from ransomware to DDoS

Mozilla Blog: A glossary of terms about cyberattacks, from ransomware to DDoS. “If you read news about technology, you’re bound to run into some jargon. Here at Mozilla, we believe that information should be as accessible as possible regardless of your level of expertise. We want to help you approach stories about technology with more curiosity and with a little less head-scratching involved. We’ll break down headline-making topics through a glossary of terms often used to discuss them. Consider it your cheat sheet to all things tech. This month, we’ll give you terms to know about cyberattacks.”

Washington Post: Internet ‘algospeak’ is changing our language in real time, from ‘nip nops’ to ‘le dollar bean’

Washington Post: Internet ‘algospeak’ is changing our language in real time, from ‘nip nops’ to ‘le dollar bean’. “Algospeak refers to code words or turns of phrase users have adopted in an effort to create a brand-safe lexicon that will avoid getting their posts removed or down-ranked by content moderation systems. For instance, in many online videos, it’s common to say ‘unalive’ rather than ‘dead,’ ‘SA’ instead of ‘sexual assault,’ or ‘spicy eggplant’ instead of ‘vibrator.’”

NPR: The war in Ukraine has reintroduced these words and phrases into our vocabulary

NPR: The war in Ukraine has reintroduced these words and phrases into our vocabulary. “Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has many of us using new words and phrases, from geopolitical terms like ‘rump state’ to military lingo such as ‘MANPADS.’ We’re also learning to decipher slogans and spot differences between Russian and Ukrainian spellings during a conflict in which information is treated as its own battlefield. Tracking surges in the words we use is part of linguist Grant Barrett’s job. He is the co-host of A Way with Words, a public radio show about words and language, and a vice president of the American Dialect Society.”

Mashable: Amanda Gorman kicks off new ‘Word of the Day’ series with ‘Sesame Street’ muppets

Mashable: Amanda Gorman kicks off new ‘Word of the Day’ series with ‘Sesame Street’ muppets. “On Monday, poet Amanda Gorman taught Sesame Street’s Grover about a new word, ‘upstander.’ Gorman is the first guest in a new “Word of the Day” video series from Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit behind Sesame Street. Produced in partnership with media company WarnerMedia Kids and Family, the series ‘harnesses the power of language to nurture children’s positive and healthy senses of self,’ according the announcement.”

Google Blog: “New normal” and other words we used a lot this year

Google Blog: “New normal” and other words we used a lot this year. “As a writer, something I’ve been thinking about in the last few weeks of 2021 are the words we used this year. 2020 was the year of ‘now more than ever,’ a phrase that began to feel meaningless as the ‘now more than ever’-worthy moments kept coming (and admittedly, as we all kept calling them that). If 2020 was the year of “now more than ever,” then what was 2021?”

PR Newswire: Dictionary.com Announces “Allyship” as its 2021 Word of the Year (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Dictionary.com Announces “Allyship” as its 2021 Word of the Year (PRESS RELEASE). “Dictionary.com, the leading online and mobile English-language educational resource, today announced its Word of the Year: allyship. The word carries special distinction this year as it marks the first time Dictionary.com has chosen a word new to its dictionary as its Word of the Year.”

Mass Live: Merriam-Webster names ‘vaccine’ as Word of the Year for 2021; ‘Insurrection,’ ‘woke’ and ‘cicada’ follows as top lookups

Mass Live: Merriam-Webster names ‘vaccine’ as Word of the Year for 2021; ‘Insurrection,’ ‘woke’ and ‘cicada’ follows as top lookups. “Merriam-Webster has named “vaccine” as its Word of the Year for 2021, a tribute to scientific advancements that aimed to end the COVID-19 pandemic and the heated arguments over inoculation mandates that the shots brought on.”