CNN: Facebook promised transparency on political ads. Its system crashed days before the UK election

CNN: Facebook promised transparency on political ads. Its system crashed days before the UK election. “Tens of thousands of political ads went missing from Facebook’s archive this week, according to researchers, just days before voters go to the polls in the most important UK election for decades. A spokesperson for Facebook (FB) confirmed its library went down but could not say how many political ads disappeared. The problem affected several countries, and Facebook prioritized fixing the UK database because of the imminent election.”

Mashable: Influencers urge young people to vote in UK election to ‘cancel the haters’

Mashable: Influencers urge young people to vote in UK election to ‘cancel the haters’ . “The ‘snowflakes’ of the United Kingdom have something to say: get out and vote. High-profile influencers have teamed up to create a video urging young people to exercise their democratic right in the General Election on Dec. 12.”

Route Fifty: Local Election Officials Can Get Free Election Auditing Software from CISA

Route Fifty: Local Election Officials Can Get Free Election Auditing Software from CISA. “The software, which is being piloted by some election offices in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Missouri, Virginia, Ohio, and Georgia, is designed to help officials make calculations needed for an audit. Arlo can help elections officials determine how many ballots to audit, randomly select which ballots to audit, and compare audited votes to tabulated votes, according to CISA.”

Poynter: Poll results are about to flood news feeds across the United States. Here’s what voters should look for when reading them.

Poynter: Poll results are about to flood news feeds across the United States. Here’s what voters should look for when reading them.. “As the 2020 election pushes ahead, voters will be seeing poll results in their news feed — lots of them. But not all polls are created equal, and it can be hard to put the results into the proper context. PolitiFact participated in a workshop hosted by the Poynter Institute (which owns PolitiFact) on understanding election polling. Here are some suggestions about what voters should pay attention to when reading polls.”

State of Delaware: Interactive Site Commemorates Women’s Suffrage Centennial

State of Delaware: Interactive Site Commemorates Women’s Suffrage Centennial. “The website… includes interactive quizzes for kids and adults, reading lists for people of all ages, and lesson plans for teachers and students of all ages. The Women’s Suffrage Centennial Committee created a website that includes a historical summary about the general Women’s Suffrage Movement as well as Delaware’s part in the effort. The site will include perspectives from people of all walks of life, making sure Delaware residents get a complete understanding of the Women’s Suffrage Movement.”

Texas Tribune: Introducing Teach Me How to Texas, a newsletter for Texas voters

Texas Tribune: Introducing Teach Me How to Texas, a newsletter for Texas voters. “Today, we’re announcing a brand new product: Teach Me How to Texas, a five-week serial newsletter aimed at helping Texans learn more about how government works. Our first edition will focus on elections.”

Mashable: Facebook will ban ads that discourage people from voting

Mashable: Facebook will ban ads that discourage people from voting. “Voter suppression is a term that describes efforts to prevent people from voting by spreading anti-voting sentiment, sharing incorrect information about how to vote, and even undermining get out the vote efforts and voting infrastructure. Now, Facebook will outright prohibit ads that discourage people from voting. For example, Facebook wouldn’t allow someone to publish an ad that suggests that voting is pointless.” Because pointing out that the platform from which 43% of American citizens get their news is totally okay with running lies as political ads is not a cogent argument that voting is useless. Or is it?