Engadget: Opera’s free VPN is now built into its Android browser

Engadget: Opera’s free VPN is now built into its Android browser. “Opera is adding a free, unlimited VPN to its Android browser. It’s rolling out the VPN gradually to beta users first before making it more widely available. You’ll be able to set your location as America, Europe or Asia, or use a setting to automatically pick the optimal connection. There are also options to turn off the VPN while searching so you get more localized results and to only activate it on private tabs.”

BetaNews: Facebook has been paying people to install a VPN that harvests data about them

BetaNews: Facebook has been paying people to install a VPN that harvests data about them. “An investigation has revealed that Facebook has been paying people aged between 13 and 35 to install a data harvesting VPN tool. The ‘Facebook Research’ VPN was offered to iOS and Android users who were paid up to $20 per month — plus referral commissions — to provide the social network with near-unfettered access to phone, app and web usage data (a Root Certificate is installed to give a terrifying level of access).”

Best VPN services of 2019: Reviews and buying advice (PC World)

PC World: Best VPN services of 2019: Reviews and buying advice. “Choosing the right virtual private network (VPN) service is no simple task. A VPN should keep your internet usage private and secure, but not every service handles your data in the same way. Just look at the critiques of notable computer security experts and online pundits to understand the challenge.”

Ars Technica: Google adds always-on VPN to its Project Fi cellular service

Ars Technica: Google adds always-on VPN to its Project Fi cellular service. “Today, Google announced a new feature for its Project Fi cellular service: an always-on VPN. Project Fi’s VPN previously was used to encrypt traffic while connecting to a network of free public Wi-Fi hotspots, but now Google will enable the VPN for all your traffic, be it over the LTE service or a Wi-Fi connection.”

CNET: Mozilla’s Firefox offers VPN service to boost privacy for $10 a month

CNET: Mozilla’s Firefox offers VPN service to boost privacy for $10 a month. “Mozilla is experimenting with a VPN (virtual private network) service to get a little financial wiggle room from people willing to spend some money to have their internet traffic encrypted better to thwart internet service providers and others from snooping on their online activity. Mozilla will test the offering with a portion of Firefox users in the US starting Wednesday.”

Social Media Explorer: How to Use a VPN If Social Networks Are Blocked in Your Country

Social Media Explorer: How to Use a VPN If Social Networks Are Blocked in Your Country. “Censorship of website content is a growing concern in countries all over the world. Governments and organizations may restrict website content gain more control. They don’t want citizens to have freedom of speech, or they want to eliminate competition for certain services. They might be concerned about the government image being ruined or the population organizing a revolt. Some of the most commonly blocked websites are social media sites like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, etc. These social sites encourage freedom of expression, which goes against the laws in many of these countries.”

Mashable: How to set up and use a VPN

Mashable: How to set up and use a VPN. “On today’s internet, having at least some level of protection is essential. A VPN or virtual private network is a tool to get an extra layer of protection — it essentially masks your connection while encrypting your data. The best part is you don’t need to get any physical hardware to use one; using a VPN is usually as simple as downloading and launching an app.”