Engadget: Mozilla is helping to make web-based VR available to everyone

Engadget: Mozilla is helping to make web-based VR available to everyone . “Even though virtual reality has been in the mainstream for several years now, it’s still not very accessible. It often takes trained engineers to create, release and distribute VR content. That could soon change, however, thanks to a new project called Reach, a VR platform created by Emblematic Group and VR pioneer Nonny de la Peña (whom we’ve featured on the Engadget Experience stage before). Built on top of WebVR and in partnership with Mozilla, the project was initially announced at Sundance 2019 earlier this year in its alpha stage. Starting today, however, it’s finally moving into beta. The end goal: to make web-based VR easier to create and consume.” Who remembers VRML? Good gravy I’m old.

Digital Trends: Oculus Quest review

Digital Trends: Oculus Quest review. “Several hours into testing the Oculus Quest, I found myself in a Jedi dojo and I was clutching a lightsaber. More than just holding the elegant weapon, I was slashing its humming blade through training bots and using it to deflect bolts of blaster fire. I was playing Vader Immortal, an episodic Star Wars adventure launching alongside Facebook’s new virtual reality headset. The real world had melted away entirely as I experienced the coolest, most immersive tech my senses have ever been stung by.”

Lifehacker: How to Save Your Jump VR Content Before Google Deletes It

Lifehacker: How to Save Your Jump VR Content Before Google Deletes It. “According to Google, all Jump VR media saved in the service will be deleted once it goes offline. Projects can be downloaded and saved elsewhere via the Jump Manager software, but you only have until June 28th to get them backed up.”

CNET: How families are giving a fantastic trip to loved ones in hospice

CNET: How families are giving a fantastic trip to loved ones in hospice. “VR may get a bad rap as a once-hot tech trend that failed to live up to expectations, but companies haven’t given up on it. Facebook last month released the $400 Oculus Quest, which CNET editor Scott Stein called the best thing he’s tried this year. And virtual reality has made headway outside of the consumer world. For example, using VR for hospice care — as a way to bring a larger world to people who’ve found themselves limited to a room, or just a bed — is beginning to catch on with care providers. “

EurekAlert: VR can improve quality of life for people with dementia

EurekAlert: VR can improve quality of life for people with dementia. “Virtual reality (VR) technology could vastly improve the quality of life for people with dementia by helping to recall past memories, reduce aggression and improve interactions with caregivers, new research by the University of Kent has discovered.”

Engadget: ‘Hardcore History’ host Dan Carlin wants you to relive WW1 in VR

Engadget: ‘Hardcore History’ host Dan Carlin wants you to relive WW1 in VR. “With his hit podcast, Hardcore History, Dan Carlin brought his love for the past to the masses. It was only a matter of time until he wanted to move beyond audio — but instead of moving into the crowded world of documentaries, he turned to VR. War Remains, his first virtual reality project which debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival this week, puts you right in the trenches of World War I. And it’s more than just another VR short: Co-producers MWM Immersive built a massive installation for the experience, allowing you to touch and feel the virtual environments in real life. (Thankfully, without recreating the smells of mud, death and gunfire.)”

EXCLUSIVE: NYPD is testing virtual reality training drills for real-life scenarios like active shooters (ABC 7 NY)

ABC 7 NY: EXCLUSIVE: NYPD is testing virtual reality training drills for real-life scenarios like active shooters. “Imagine the possibilities if the NYPD could conduct active shooter training drills at the World Trade Center? Now because of virtual reality they can. “