Congressional Budget Office: CBO Updates Its Interactive Tool for Analyzing the Effects of Federal Minimum-Wage Increases

Congressional Budget Office: CBO Updates Its Interactive Tool for Analyzing the Effects of Federal Minimum-Wage Increases . “Today, CBO updated its interactive tool—initially released in November 2019—that allows users to create custom policy options to examine how different approaches to changing the minimum wage would affect earnings, employment, family income, and poverty. The estimates shown in the tool were generated using the same methods underlying CBO’s most recent reports on minimum-wage increases: The Budgetary Effects of the Raise the Wage Act of 2021, published in February 2021, and The Effects on Employment and Family Income of Increasing the Federal Minimum Wage, published in July 2019.”

America’s hidden economic crisis: Widespread wage cuts (Politico)

Politico: America’s hidden economic crisis: Widespread wage cuts. “Millions of Americans who managed to hold onto their jobs amid the coronavirus pandemic have seen their incomes drop as employers slashed wages and hours to weather what they expected to be a short-term shutdown. Now, with the virus raging and the recession deepening, those cuts that were meant to be temporary could turn permanent — or even pave the way for further layoffs. That could portend deep damage to the labor market and the economy because so many workers who have kept their jobs have less money to spend than a few months ago.”

CNET: Amazon extends its higher hourly and overtime pay during coronavirus

CNET: Amazon extends its higher hourly and overtime pay during coronavirus. “Amazon is extending its increased hourly pay and double overtime pay, offering warehouse employees in the US and Canada $2 extra an hour through May 16. The online retail giant said Friday the higher wages will now cost the company just under $700 million, up from an estimated $350 million when it first announced the increased pay in mid-March.”

Mashable: Earning a minimum wage from Spotify is a lot harder than you think

Mashable: Earning a minimum wage from Spotify is a lot harder than you think. “For the study, minimum wage in the United States was defined at the federal level, which is $7.25 an hour. That brings the annual minimum wage salary to $15,080.40 when based on a full time, 40-hour work week. Add to that the $0.00437 per stream (!) that Spotify, currently the largest streaming music service, pays and you’re looking at 3,450,892 streams needed to carve out a minimum wage.”

Congressional Budget Office: CBO Releases an Interactive Tool and Related Computer Code for Analyzing the Effects of Federal Minimum-Wage Increases

Congressional Budget Office: CBO Releases an Interactive Tool and Related Computer Code for Analyzing the Effects of Federal Minimum-Wage Increases. “Today, CBO released an interactive tool that allows users to explore the effects of policies that would increase the federal minimum wage, including the Raise the Wage Act (as passed by the House of Representatives on July 18, 2019) and options CBO analyzed in The Effects on Employment and Family Income of Increasing the Federal Minimum Wage. Users can also create custom policy options to examine how different approaches to changing the minimum wage would affect earnings, employment, family income, and poverty.”

The Atlantic: The Online Gig Economy’s ‘Race to the Bottom’

The Atlantic: The Online Gig Economy’s ‘Race to the Bottom’. “You can buy almost any thing you want online—toothpaste, books, plastic devices that allow you to lick your cat. On digital work platforms like Upwork, Fiverr, and Freelancer.com, you can also buy nearly any service—often from someone halfway around the world, sometimes for just a few bucks. On Fiverr, one of the most popular of these platforms, you’ll find offers for someone who will write an e-book ‘on any topic’; a person who will perform ‘a Voiceover as Bernie Sanders’; someone who will write your Tinder profile for you, and someone who will design a logo for your real-estate company. The people selling this labor live in Nigeria, Mexico, the United Kingdom, and Bangladesh, respectively. Each of them charge $5 for these tasks.”

Selfies and salaries: Swiss share salary information on new site aiming to end pay discrimination (Euronews)

Euronews: Selfies and salaries: Swiss share salary information on new site aiming to end pay discrimination. “We’ve all wondered how much our bosses or coworkers make. Now, in Switzerland, there may be a way to find out. Swiss trade union Unia has spearheaded the creation of a new website where anyone in the country can post their salaries. The website… Zeig Deinen Lohn (Show Your Salary), went live last week and already has about 500 people posting their details. The website crashed throughout Wednesday due to the heavy online traffic it’s been receiving.”

The Daily Jeff: Ohio State employee salaries available in searchable online database

The Daily Jeff: Ohio State employee salaries available in searchable online database. “Ohio State University salaries are now searchable in an online database, the school announced Thursday. All non-student employee salary information is available on Ohio State’s human resources website, ‘breaking new ground for transparency among public universities in Ohio,’ the university’s announcement said.”

The Guardian: Google refuses legal request to share pay records in gender discrimination case

The Guardian: Google refuses legal request to share pay records in gender discrimination case. “Google is resisting a legal request to disclose salary records in a class-action gender discrimination lawsuit, marking the technology company’s latest efforts to prevent scrutiny of how much it pays its female employees. Google attorneys argued in court on Friday that a judge should block a suit brought by former employees alleging systematic pay disparities on behalf of all women at the company. The company is also arguing that it should not have to provide information on the salaries of men and women or disclose wage policy documents until a first ruling on the class-action status.”

The Guardian: Facebook worker living in garage to Zuckerberg: challenges are right outside your door

The Guardian: Facebook worker living in garage to Zuckerberg: challenges are right outside your door. “Mark Zuckerberg’s travels throughout the United States to fulfill his 2017 ‘personal challenge’ to ‘learn about people’s hopes and challenges’ have seen him drive a tractor, meet recovering heroin addicts, don a hard hat and speak out against the staggering wealth inequality that his $68.5bn fortune so clearly represents. But to Nicole, a worker in one of Facebook’s cafeterias, they have also raised an important question: ‘Is he going to come here?’”