Newswise: AI model using daily step counts predicts unplanned hospitalizations during cancer therapy

Newswise: AI model using daily step counts predicts unplanned hospitalizations during cancer therapy. “An artificial intelligence (AI) model developed by researchers can predict the likelihood that a patient may have an unplanned hospitalization during their radiation treatments for cancer. The machine-learning model uses daily step counts as a proxy to monitor patients’ health as they go through cancer therapy, offering clinicians a real-time method to provide personalized care.”

New York Times: Navigational Apps for the Blind Could Have a Broader Appeal

New York Times: Navigational Apps for the Blind Could Have a Broader Appeal. “Nearly every blind person has at least one story of getting lost or disoriented…. That may change, though, with the release of new apps specifically designed with pedestrians and accessibility in mind. Thanks to improvements in mapping technology and smartphone cameras, a number have emerged with features like indoor navigation, detailed descriptions of the surrounding environment and more warnings about obstacles.”

The Gutenberg Gait Database: World’s largest collection of gait analysis data of healthy individuals published (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: The Gutenberg Gait Database: World’s largest collection of gait analysis data of healthy individuals published. “The database has been compiled by Dr. Fabian Horst of the Institute of Sports Science at Mainz University and Djordje Slijepčević of St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences in Austria and comprises data from 350 healthy volunteers who attended the biomechanics lab at JGU [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz] over the past seven years. The database contains ground reaction force (GRF) and center of pressure (COP) data measured for two consecutive steps, which were recorded by force plates embedded in the ground over the entire duration of ground contact of the feet.”

New study finds slow walkers four times more likely to die from COVID-19: study (Medical XPress)

Medical XPress: New study finds slow walkers four times more likely to die from COVID-19: study. “Slow walkers are almost four times more likely to die from COVID-19, and have over twice the risk of contracting a severe version of the virus, according to a team of researchers from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre led by Professor Tom Yates at the University of Leicester.”

The Verge: Spice Up Your Daily Pandemic Walk With These Apps

The Verge: Spice Up Your Daily Pandemic Walk With These Apps. “Taking a daily or, if I’m being honest, semi-daily walk is a lockdown habit that has seen me through These Unprecedented Times. I’m not alone, either — without gyms or really anywhere else to go at all, lots of us have embraced (or at times, endured) a daily walk around the neighborhood….Here are some techniques to keep your pandemic walk routine fresh and the apps that can help you put them into practice.”

University of Amsterdam: Google Streetview shows social importance pedestrian friendly environment

University of Amsterdam: Google Streetview shows social importance pedestrian friendly environment. “With Google Streetview and Deep Learning, researchers at the University of Amsterdam and the University of Twente identified how the urban environment is linked to the vitality of social organisations and neighbourhoods. They conclude that, if an environment provides more space to pedestrians, this will be conducive to neighbourhood-based social organisations’ chances of survival.”

Intelligent Transport: ITDP reveals new tools to improve transit inclusivity and city walkability

Intelligent Transport: ITDP reveals new tools to improve transit inclusivity and city walkability. “The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) has revealed Pedestrians First – a guide and set of online tools to aid urban planners and city officials in assessing inclusivity of their cities’ transit systems as well as the walkability of their neighbourhoods and streets. The guide includes walkability data for nearly 1,000 metropolitan areas around the world, which users can explore in an interactive map. ITDP says this is the first-ever worldwide analysis to measure walkability in cities globally.”

Find. Map. Save: join the search to save thousands of miles of lost historic paths (Ramblers)

Ramblers: Find. Map. Save: join the search to save thousands of miles of lost historic paths. “An estimated 10,000 miles of historic paths – the equivalent of the distance from London to Sydney – are thought to be missing from the map in England and Wales. These historic paths are a vital part of our heritage, describing how people have travelled over the centuries, yet if they are not claimed by 2026, we risk losing them forever. We want to build a movement of ‘citizen geographers’ to help find all these missing rights of way before it’s too late.”

Government News (Australia): Shade mapping tool helps pedestrians dodge heat

Government News (Australia): Shade mapping tool helps pedestrians dodge heat. “With the mercury recently hitting 45C in Bendigo, Council has adopted a new tool which helps residents seek out routes with the most shade coverage and avoid the heat. The Shadeways tool, developed by researchers from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, uses satellite imagery to generate a ‘temperature likelihood’ monitor. By analysing surfaces and vegetation type, it creates an urban heat map and generates suggested shaded routes.”

Jewish News of Northern California: New digital map offers walking tours of San Francisco’s hidden Jewish history

Jewish News of Northern California: New digital map offers walking tours of San Francisco’s hidden Jewish history. “The main map collects Jewish sites across the city, from landmarks like Congregation Emanu-El to lesser-known bits of history, like Cable Car Clothiers, located at the original Montgomery Street location where founder Charlie Pivnick first opened it.” There are plans to expand the maps further.