Stanford Libraries: Stanford Libraries to make the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal Trial Archives 1945-1946 accessible online with funding from Taube Philanthropies

Stanford Libraries: Stanford Libraries to make the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal Trial Archives 1945-1946 accessible online with funding from Taube Philanthropies. “In pursuit of the common goal of dissemination and long-term preservation of the archives of the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal, Stanford Libraries has been authorized by the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague to manage long-term digital preservation and online hosting with significant scholarly functions for records of the war crimes trial conducted at Nuremberg in 1945 and 1946.”

“Video Unavailable”: Social Media Platforms Remove Evidence of War Crimes (Human Rights Watch)

Human Rights Watch: “Video Unavailable”: Social Media Platforms Remove Evidence of War Crimes. “In recent years, social media platforms have been taking down online content more often and more quickly, often in response to the demands of governments, but in a way that prevents the use of that content to investigate people suspected of involvement in serious crimes, including war crimes. While it is understandable that these platforms remove content that incites or promotes violence, they are not currently archiving this material in a manner that is accessible for investigators and researchers to help hold perpetrators to account.”

Vice: The U.S. Army Twitch Channel Is Banning People for Asking About War Crimes

Vice: The U.S. Army Twitch Channel Is Banning People for Asking About War Crimes. “The American military is getting big into esports. The U.S. Army has launched its own Twitch channel where members of its team stream Call of Duty: Warzone and interact with users on the site. The channel has videos going back two months, but things got spicy in the chat on Wednesday night when viewers started asking questions about U.S. war crimes.”

Foreign Affairs: Facebook’s Flawed Plan to End Antiquities Trafficking

Foreign Affairs: Facebook’s Flawed Plan to End Antiquities Trafficking. “As scholars who have spent years tracking the illicit trade in Middle Eastern artifacts and studying its role in financing terrorism, we welcome Facebook’s decision as an indication that it is beginning to acknowledge the scale of this dangerous problem. But we have grave concerns about the company’s planned approach to combating antiquities trafficking. Facebook’s new policy, while more proactive than its previous one, fails to acknowledge that because antiquities trafficking is a war crime under international humanitarian law, the company should therefore preserve as evidence—and not simply destroy—the material it removes from its site.”

MIT Technology Review: Human rights activists want to use AI to help prove war crimes in court

MIT Technology Review: Human rights activists want to use AI to help prove war crimes in court. “The initiative, led by Swansea University in the UK along with a number of human rights groups, is part of an ongoing effort to monitor the alleged war crimes happening in Yemen and create greater legal accountability around them. In 2017, the platform Yemeni Archive began compiling a database of videos and photos documenting the abuses. Content was gathered from thousands of sources—including submissions from journalists and civilians, as well as open-source videos from social-media platforms like YouTube and Facebook—and preserved on a blockchain so they couldn’t be tampered with undetected.”

Focus Taiwan: TJC unveils online database of persecutions in martial law period

This in “Around” instead of “New Resources” because I can’t find an URL for this new database. Focus Taiwan: TJC unveils online database of persecutions in martial law period. “Taiwan’s Transitional Justice Commission (TJC) on Wednesday launched a searchable online database of curated court files of nearly 10,000 victims of political persecution during the country’s martial law period. The database also contains the names of the military officers involved in the court trials of the victims.”

Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum: destroyed identities — the digital reconstruction of Auschwitz-Birkenau victims’ data

Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum: Destroyed identities – the digital reconstruction of Auschwitz-Birkenau victims’ data. “One of the most important goals of the Repository is to collect dispersed documentation of transport lists to Auschwitz-Birkenau. ‘We must remember that about 900,000 Jews deported in mass transports from German-occupied Europe – women, children, and men – were murdered in the gas chambers immediately upon arrival at the camp without registration. There are no post-camp records of them. Transport lists may help us to establish their names,’ said the Director of the Museum, Dr. Piotr M. A. Cywiński. At the moment, the existing database, which contains information on persons registered in Auschwitz, is being merged with the data from the transport lists. Consequently, as early as in May 2020, the search results at http://www.auschwitz.org will be enriched with over 420,000 names from the transport lists of Jews deported to the camp.”

Yonhap News Agency: Gov’t to integrate databases on victims of Japan’s forced labor

Yonhap News Agency: Gov’t to integrate databases on victims of Japan’s forced labor . “South Korea will integrate databases on Koreans conscripted as forced labor or soldiers during Japan’s colonial rule, the National Archives of Korea (NAK) said Monday. At present, the databases containing lists of Korean victims of Japan’s wartime forced labor and military conscription are spread among several state institutions, including the NAK, the National Memorial Museum of Forced Mobilization under Japanese Occupation and the National Institute of Korean History.”

Balkan Transitional Justice: BIRN Awards Grants to Explore War Crimes Archives

Balkan Transitional Justice: BIRN Awards Grants to Explore War Crimes Archives. “The Balkan Investigative Reporting Network has selected 20 journalists, historians, artists and activists to receive grants to create small projects based on the archives of the UN war crimes tribunal in The Hague and domestic courts in former Yugoslav countries. The recipients of the grants will conduct research, collect documents and dig deeper into the courts’ archives.”

Balkan Transitional Justice: BIRN Offers Grants to Explore War Crimes Archives

Balkan Transitional Justice: BIRN Offers Grants to Explore War Crimes Archives. “The Balkan Investigative Reporting Network has launched a call for proposals for small projects by journalists, artists, historians and civil society activists covering topics related to the archives of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and domestic courts in former Yugoslav countries that dealt with war crimes cases. BIRN said that it is seeking projects that will creatively use courts’ archives in order to promote truth, justice and accountability in the Balkans.”

The Atlantic: Tech Companies Are Deleting Evidence of War Crimes

The Atlantic: Tech Companies Are Deleting Evidence of War Crimes. “…some of what governments ask tech companies to do, such as suppressing violent content, cuts against other legitimate goals, such as bringing warlords and dictators to justice. Balancing these priorities is hard enough when humans are making judgments in accordance with established legal norms. In contrast, tech giants operate largely in the dark.”

University of California: UC Berkeley students investigate war crimes using social media

University of California: UC Berkeley students investigate war crimes using social media. “A ‘super-experimental’ lab launched at the University of California, Berkeley in 2016 to teach students to mine social media for potential human rights violations and war crimes today is producing a new generation of human rights investigators — and they’re being scooped up by employers including Amnesty International, The New York Times, the BBC and the International Criminal Court.”

OSCE: Prosecutor’s Office of Bosnia and Herzegovina to develop digital archive of evidence brought in war crimes cases

Organization for Security and Co-Operation in Europe: Prosecutor’s Office of Bosnia and Herzegovina to develop digital archive of evidence brought in war crimes cases. “The Head of the OSCE Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), Bruce G. Berton, the President of the High Judicial and Prosecutorial Council (HJPC) of BiH, Milan Tegeltija, and the Chief Prosecutor of the Prosecutor’s Office of BiH, Gordana Tadić, today signed a Memorandum of Understanding to support the development of a digital archive of all evidence pertaining to war crimes cases in the possession of the BiH Prosecutor’s Office.”