Fractured History: Why Kosovo Has No Proper Wartime Archive (Balkan Transitional Justice)

Balkan Transitional Justice: Fractured History: Why Kosovo Has No Proper Wartime Archive. “The Council for the Defence of Human Rights and Freedoms is still the main repository for records produced by various individual human rights activists in Kosovo from 1989 to 1999. Over the last two decades, very little has been done to collect archive materials related to the war. Since the war ended, the Kosovo State Archives hasn’t managed to create any proper archival collection. The head of the State Archives, Bedri Zyberaj said that the materials it holds related to the war are photographs and some articles from foreign newspapers about the conflict.”

New York Times: The War in Ukraine Is the True Culture War

New York Times: The War in Ukraine Is the True Culture War. “The appalling damage to theaters, libraries and religious sites (above all in Mariupol, the occupied city in Ukraine’s southeast) in these past four months alone broadens a horrendous tide of cultural destruction this century, in Syria, Iraq, Ethiopia, Mali, Armenia and Afghanistan. But the risks to Ukrainian culture are more than mere collateral damage.”

Museums+Heritage: 12 museums among cultural sites damaged or destroyed in Ukraine confirms UNESCO

Museums+Heritage: 12 museums among cultural sites damaged or destroyed in Ukraine confirms UNESCO . “According to a new count, 152 cultural sites in Ukraine have been partially or totally destroyed since the beginning of the war. Last week UNESCO published an updated assessment of the damage caused to cultural sites in Ukraine since 24 February 2022, when the Russian offensive began. According to the checks carried out by its experts, 152 cultural sites have been partially or totally destroyed as a result of the fighting, including 30 historical buildings, 18 cultural centres, 15 monuments, 12 museums, seven libraries and 70 religious buildings.”

NPR: Open source intelligence methods are being used to investigate war crimes in Ukraine

NPR: Open source intelligence methods are being used to investigate war crimes in Ukraine. “We’ve heard about so-called open-source intelligence for a few years now. It’s where publicly available information – things like satellite imagery, phone videos, social media – can be pieced together to reveal secrets about wars or threats. Now it’s being used to track down war crimes and war criminals in Ukraine. It is painstaking work carried out by an army of internet sleuths. NPR’s Deborah Amos reports from Berlin, where some of them are based.”

Exclusive: A crypto-based dossier could help prove Russia committed war crimes (CNN)

CNN: Exclusive: A crypto-based dossier could help prove Russia committed war crimes. “Starling [Lab]’s dossier isn’t a typical exhibit. Instead, the group’s submission will feature publicly available online information that’s been preserved and verified using the blockchain technology behind cryptocurrencies, in what it says is the first submission of evidence of its kind to any court of law.”

Archinect: UNESCO releases a new list of damaged cultural sites across Ukraine

Archinect: UNESCO releases a new list of damaged cultural sites across Ukraine. “The organization has verified that 139 sites have suffered damage since that time, a combined total of 62 religious sites, 12 museums, 26 historic buildings, 17 cultural buildings, 15 monuments, and 7 libraries, including the Babyn Yar Holocaust remembrance site in Kyiv, which have come under Russian bombs and artillery shells as the conflict shifts from a three-pronged invasion to a more targeted offensive focused in the eastern Donbas region.”

40 thousand gigabytes: An archive of Assad’s war crimes in Syria (TRT World)

TRT World: 40 thousand gigabytes: An archive of Assad’s war crimes in Syria. “Tamer Turkmani stares at his laptop screen for hours every day. A Syrian national, Turkmani has been collecting photographic and video evidence of people who have been killed in the course of the Syrian civil war. Turkmani’s goal is to maintain a digital archive of the victims who have been shot dead by the troops loyal to Bashar al Assad.”

Coda Story: Social media companies are facing pressure to start archiving war crimes evidence. How will that work?

Coda Story: Social media companies are facing pressure to start archiving war crimes evidence. How will that work?. “Long before politicians caught on, Alexa Koenig, the executive director of the Human Rights Center at UC Berkeley, was working on how social media can be used as evidence in international courts — and how companies can do a better job of preserving it. In the report Digital Lockers: Archiving Social Media Evidence of Atrocity Crimes, Koenig and her team outlined how social media platforms can transform from ‘accidental and unstable archives for human rights content’ to vaults of evidence accessible to investigators and prosecutors. Going a step further, the team at the Human Rights Center created a framework for using digital open source information in international courts.”

Lieber Institute West Point: Ukraine Symposium – The Ukraine Conflict And The Future Of Digital Cultural Property

Lieber Institute West Point: Ukraine Symposium – The Ukraine Conflict And The Future Of Digital Cultural Property. “Various international instruments explicitly provide for the protection of cultural property in armed conflict. As conceived, the law was formulated to protect physical works from damage or destruction in war. Events in Ukraine, however, have demonstrated that armed conflict can endanger digital material as well. Some digital creations might even qualify as a digital form of cultural property—that is, digital cultural property. Given the growing prevalence of digital material and the threat posed to all forms of cultural works in war, how should States approach their legal obligation to protect digital cultural property in the event of armed conflict?”

Meaww: Who was Petro Dziuba? Russia uses UKRAINIAN pilot on propaganda poster after bombing cemetery where he’s buried

Meaww: Who was Petro Dziuba? Russia uses UKRAINIAN pilot on propaganda poster after bombing cemetery where he’s buried. “A Russian poster celebrating Victory Day on Monday, May 9, reportedly depicted a Ukrainian pilot from the Soviet era who shot down 16 German planes in World War II. The photos made the rounds on social media and sparked outrage amid claims that Russia had bombed the Kharkiv cemetery where airman Petro Dzubia was buried.”