The GW Hatchet: Foggy Bottom Association launches digital neighborhood history project

The GW Hatchet: Foggy Bottom Association launches digital neighborhood history project. “The Foggy Bottom Association kicked off an ongoing history project last month with a series of blog posts and an archive of historical resources about the neighborhood’s history after announcing the initiative earlier this year. The leaders of the project said they hope students and residents will form a better understanding of the neighborhood and increase efforts to preserve and acknowledge the centuries-long history of Foggy Bottom.”

DCist: A New Photo Collection Adds Nearly 2,000 Images To The D.C. Public Library’s Go-Go Archive

DCist: A New Photo Collection Adds Nearly 2,000 Images To The D.C. Public Library’s Go-Go Archive. “The D.C. Public Library’s Go-Go Archive is a digital and physical resource full of books, magazines, records, cassette tapes, DVDs, and 10,000 tweets about the Don’t Mute DC movement. But since it was established in 2012, the collection has suffered from an acute lack of photos capturing the culture surrounding the music — and even the bands that produced it.That’s changing this week, as the D.C. Public Library is adding nearly 2,000 photos that portray a decade of performances and behind-the-scenes moments shared by legendary go-go musicians and fans alike.” Seeing this new resource immediately reminded me of

DC Public Library: DC Public Library Adds Washington City Paper Archive

DC Public Library: DC Public Library Adds Washington City Paper Archive. “The Washington City Paper digital collection is being added to the Library’s People’s Archive. Washington City Paper has been Washington, D.C.’s principal alternative weekly newspaper since its first issue in February 1981, and focuses on local news and arts. The paper’s name has evolved over the years, from its original, ‘1981,’ to ‘City Paper’ in 1982, to ‘Washington City Paper’ in 1988. Notable writers who were once City Paper staffers include David Carr, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Jake Tapper, Katherine Boo, Clara Jeffery and Michael Schaffer.” The archive is still in progress, with issues from 1981 current available.

DCist: The Historian Behind ‘Chocolate City’ Wants You To Know How The Black Power Movement Reshaped D.C.

DCist: The Historian Behind ‘Chocolate City’ Wants You To Know How The Black Power Movement Reshaped D.C.. “[George Derek] Musgrove is the co-author, with Chris Myers Asch, of Chocolate City: A History of Race and Democracy in the Nation’s Capital. On Monday, the first day of Black History Month, Musgrove launched a new website that explores an antecedent to today’s Black Lives Matter movement and push for racial justice — the Black Power movement. Musgrove wanted to tell the story of how the District became a national center of Black Power organizing, just like New York, Los Angeles, Newark, and Chicago.”

WTOP: New digital project lays bare history of slavery around the White House

WTOP: New digital project lays bare history of slavery around the White House. “A new website initiative launched this week by the White House Historical Association takes an in-depth look into slavery around the nation’s capital. ‘Slavery in the President’s Neighborhood’ offers a comprehensive timeline and abundant resources on the enslaved people who built, worked for and lived around the White House.”

Washington Post: D.C.’s Black Broadway is gone. A Georgetown professor wants to remind U Street newcomers of its history.

Washington Post: D.C.’s Black Broadway is gone. A Georgetown professor wants to remind U Street newcomers of its history.. “[Professor Ananya] Chakravarti convened a team of students, community members and experts to assemble a digital collection of U Street history that, she hopes, will make the area’s rich past easier to access and understand. She calls it ‘community-based historical preservation.’”

Lincoln Journal-Star: UNL project illustrates history of slaves suing for their freedom

Lincoln Journal-Star: UNL project illustrates history of slaves suing for their freedom. “UNL’s Center for Digital Research in the Humanities have compiled and digitized court documents from more than 500 freedom suits and published them in an online database titled ‘O Say Can You See: Early Washington, D.C., Law and Family,’ through a grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The project focuses on slavery in the 1820s and 1830s, said project manager Kaci Nash, when African-Americans were held as property by a wide strata of Washington society.”

DC Public Library: Library Acquires Women in the Life magazine

DC Public Library: Library Acquires Women in the Life magazine. “The Library will digitize, maintain and make all 90 issues of Women in the Life Magazine available on Dig DC, the online portal maintained by the DC Public Library’s Special Collections division. When this work is complete, the story of DC’s lesbian of color community will be available to students, scholars, members of the LGBTQ community and anyone else who wants to understand issues that impacted the Black lesbian community from 1993 to 2003.”