Washington City Paper: Hilton Brothers to Close Seven Bars ‘for Foreseeable Future’ on Halloween

Washington City Paper: Hilton Brothers to Close Seven Bars ‘for Foreseeable Future’ on Halloween. “The brothers and nightlife impresarios behind many bars and restaurants stretching up 14th Street NW and down U Street NW will close seven establishments for the foreseeable future on Halloween. Eric and Ian Hilton say they fought for six months to keep American Ice Company, The Brixton, Echo Park, El Rey, The Gibson, Marvin, and Players Club running through the COVID-19 pandemic, but ultimately couldn’t.”

DCist: People Are Rarely Cited For Large Social Gatherings In The D.C. Area

DCist: People Are Rarely Cited For Large Social Gatherings In The D.C. Area. “D.C., Maryland and Virginia all have ordinances in place that limit large gatherings and require people to wear masks during COVID-19. But according to health departments and police, enforcement of those gatherings has not been particularly punitive, with few area residents receiving fines or citations in connection with mass gatherings.”

Washington Post: Police struggle to enforce social distancing, mask orders as mass gatherings flout rules

Washington Post: Police struggle to enforce social distancing, mask orders as mass gatherings flout rules. “When a crowd assembled in Oxon Run Park in Southeast Washington for a concert last month, residents accused authorities of ignoring violations of the mayor’s orders restricting mass gatherings during the coronavirus pandemic. A week ago, another gathering in the District brought attention locally and beyond after gunfire erupted and 22 people were shot, one fatally. People again demanded to know why a crowd was allowed to grow into the hundreds, and even the police chief questioned whether his officers should have broken it up.”

Washington DC: D.C. Public Schools will start the academic year with all-virtual learning

Washington Post: D.C. Public Schools will start the academic year with all-virtual learning. “D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) announced Thursday that schools in the nation’s capital would start the 2020-2021 academic year all-virtual, a scenario that the city’s leaders had been trying to avoid. The decision isn’t a surprise. Coronavirus infection numbers are on the rise in the D.C. region, and neighboring school districts in Maryland and Northern Virginia have already canceled plans for in-person classes in the fall, saying they will begin with distance learning.”

Washington Post: Librarians alarmed about coronavirus safety at D.C.’s reopened public libraries

Washington Post: Librarians alarmed about coronavirus safety at D.C.’s reopened public libraries. “When the District’s public libraries began gradually reopening in late May, many residents rushed to check out books for the first time in six weeks. By mid-July, the library was opening its doors for six hours a day, five days a week, for patrons who could come inside to borrow items and spend time using public computers at 14 locations. But librarians say the reopening has been poorly handled, exposing both staff members and the public to potential coronavirus risks. They also say library managers have kept staff in the dark about colleagues who come down with the virus and have struggled with cleaning protocols and mask requirements.”

Reuters: D.C. mayor says visitors coming from coronavirus hot spots must quarantine for 14 days

Reuters: D.C. mayor says visitors coming from coronavirus hot spots must quarantine for 14 days. “Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser on Friday said anyone coming into the District of Columbia from a coronavirus hot spot who was not traveling for essential activities will be required to self-quarantine for 14 days. The order, which goes into effect on Monday, excludes neighboring Maryland and Virginia, Bowser said on Twitter.”

Washington Post: After last-minute change, D.C. says it wants students back but will wait and watch virus

Washington Post: After last-minute change, D.C. says it wants students back but will wait and watch virus. “All week, parents and teachers in the nation’s capital expected the city to make its big announcement, revealing what school could look like for many of the 100,000 public school children in the fall. Younger students would return to in-person learning twice a week, the mayor would announce, and older students could go back once a week. That was the plan as late as Wednesday evening, city officials confirmed. But in the hour before the scheduled news conference, officials switched the location from an elementary school to a different government building and said plans had changed.”

Washington Post: Virginia reports no daily coronavirus deaths as region sees smallest case increase since April

Washington Post: Virginia reports no daily coronavirus deaths as region sees smallest case increase since April. “Virginia reported no known coronavirus-related deaths Monday for the first time in more than three months, while the District lost ground in a key metric after identifying a weeks-old spike in cases. The District, Maryland and Virginia reported 659 new known coronavirus cases Monday, bringing the regional total to more than 146,000 since the start of the pandemic. The daily increase is the smallest number in the three jurisdictions since April 3.”

Washington Post: D.C. school system and teachers clash ahead of school reopening

Washington Post: D.C. school system and teachers clash ahead of school reopening. “The Washington Teachers’ Union is telling its members to ignore a school system letter asking teachers to select whether they plan to teach in person in the fall or stay home. The letter, and the union’s response, represent the latest tension between school leaders and teachers as the city struggles to build confidence in its school reopening plan.”

WUSA: Did your landlord receive a mortgage deferral? This new online tool holds DC landlords accountable

WUSA: Did your landlord receive a mortgage deferral? This new online tool holds DC landlords accountable. “Back in April, DC Council passed emergency COVID-19 legislation that required mortgage lenders to offer deferrals to property owners. The legislation also called for those property owners to pass that same relief on to their renters. DISB, the District’s Department of Insurance, Securities, and Banking created a tool that allows renters to hold their landlords accountable. It’s called the mortgage deferment locator tool.”

McClatchy: D.C. National Guard members test positive for COVID-19 after responding to protests

McClatchy: D.C. National Guard members test positive for COVID-19 after responding to protests. “Members of the D.C. National Guard who were responding to protests in the nation’s capital over the death of George Floyd have tested positive for COVID-19, a spokeswoman said on Tuesday. The service members were part of the 1,300 D.C. National Guard members called up to help law enforcement respond initially to rioting on May 31, that was followed by days of peaceful protests. A Guard spokeswoman did not identify how many positive tests the unit has recorded.”

The Hill: Wilson Roosevelt Jerman, former White House butler who served through 11 presidencies, dies of COVID-19

The Hill: Wilson Roosevelt Jerman, former White House butler who served through 11 presidencies, dies of COVID-19. “Wilson Roosevelt Jerman, who served as a White House butler for more than five decades, has died of COVID-19 at the age of 91, local media report. Granddaughter Jamila Garrett said in an interview with FOX 5 DC that that Jerman first began working at the White House as a cleaner under the Eisenhower administration in 1957.”

WJLA: FEMA giving D.C. 6 trailers to hold bodies after surge in COVID-19 deaths

WJLA: FEMA giving D.C. 6 trailers to hold bodies after surge in COVID-19 deaths. “The D.C. Medical Examiners has trailers (pictured above) parked in front of the Forensics Lab for transporting multiple bodies. They are transporting them to six larger trailers on loan from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. D.C. has confirmed that FEMA is loaning the city six, 53-foot trailers to hold bodies because there have been so many COVID-19 deaths in the city – 277 as of today.”

Washington Post: More people in District dying outside of hospitals during pandemic

Washington Post: More people in District dying outside of hospitals during pandemic. “The number of people in the District dying outside hospitals spiked as the novel coronavirus started its sweep through the nation’s capital, raising concerns that people suffering a wide range of critical ailments are not seeking medical attention. Some of those people contracted the virus; the city has so far confirmed such deaths at home for three residents. But officials suspect many of the deaths are not related to the virus and may be the result of heart attacks, drug overdoses or other causes.”

Washingtonian: An Artist is Projecting Giant Memorials to Covid-19 Victims on Walls All Over DC

Washingtonian: An Artist is Projecting Giant Memorials to Covid-19 Victims on Walls All Over DC. “The faces of those who have died from coronavirus were illuminated in Adams Morgan for an hour Thursday night. Visual artist Robin Bell projected the photos onto a building along with messages from loved ones as a part of Covid Memorial, a digital archive honoring the deceased and those who mourn them. ‘Collectively, we’re going through a loss. We’re going through grief,’ says Bell. ‘There’s something about taking a moment and acknowledging where we’re at and acknowledging the people we have lost.'”