WUSA: Hackers demand $4 million ransom from DC police, as more officers’ confidential info posted to the dark web

WUSA: Hackers demand $4 million ransom from DC police, as more officers’ confidential info posted to the dark web. “In the latest escalation of an unprecedented cyber-attack against U.S. law enforcement, hackers belonging to the Russian-speaking Babuk syndicate posted a $4 million ransom demand against the Metropolitan Police Department on the dark web. The demand came as more D.C. police officers received notice their confidential information was included within the scope of the April hack.”

DCist: D.C. Launches Website For Vaccine Records, But Your Data Might Not Be In There Yet

DCist: D.C. Launches Website For Vaccine Records, But Your Data Might Not Be In There Yet. “The portal will allow residents to view and print official copies of their vaccination records, and their dependents’ records, at any time. Perfect for if you lost your vaccination card or ran it through the wash on accident. The record can also be used as proof for places that require COVID immunization. But many people on social media reported that despite being vaccinated, their data hasn’t shown up on the website.”

WUSA: MPD officer files obtained in server cyberattack, Chief Contee says

WUSA: MPD officer files obtained in server cyberattack, Chief Contee says. “Police files containing personal information on some MPD officers were compromised following a cyberattack on one of the DC Police Department’s internal servers, according to acting Chief Robert Contee. Hackers had previously claimed they’d posted confidential officer dossiers online. In an email sent to DC Police, Contee said files containing personal information had been obtained during a Babuk ransomware attack.”

BBC: Cyber-attack hackers threaten to share US police informant data

BBC: Cyber-attack hackers threaten to share US police informant data. “Washington DC’s Metropolitan Police Department has said its computer network has been breached in a targeted cyber-attack, US media report. A ransomware group called Babuk is reportedly threatening to release sensitive data on police informants if it is not contacted within three days. The FBI is investigating the extent of the breach, US media reported, citing the Washington DC police department.”

Washington Post: The pandemic helped D.C. slash family homelessness. But a new crisis looms.

Washington Post: The pandemic helped D.C. slash family homelessness. But a new crisis looms.. “Thousands of families who have lost jobs during the pandemic and been unable to pay their rent could end up on the street, analysts say. Thousands more could face an abrupt end to their ‘rapid rehousing’ rent subsidy, meaning they must either dramatically increase monthly payments or lose their newfound stability. And with D.C. revenue shrunken by the lack of tourism, entertainment and sales tax dollars, the city has warned of potential funding cuts next year to nonprofits that offer services to the homeless.”

NBC Washington: Almost 40% of DC’s Shots Have Gone to Non-Residents

NBC Washington: Almost 40% of DC’s Shots Have Gone to Non-Residents. “The News4 I-Team has been tracking the data and found despite older and medically vulnerable residents being eligible for several weeks, 39.9% of the doses administered in the District have still gone to people who don’t live there. By comparison, only 2.5% of Virginia’s vaccine doses are listed as having gone to out-of-state residents. An additional 7% were missing residency information.”

DCist: D.C. Lost At Least 375 Businesses Since Last March. Here’s How Those Closures Have Reshaped The City

DCist: D.C. Lost At Least 375 Businesses Since Last March. Here’s How Those Closures Have Reshaped The City. “At least 235 brick-and-mortar businesses have closed permanently in D.C. since the first known coronavirus case was reported on March 7, 2020, with 100 more shuttered temporarily, a count by DCist/WAMU found. (The status of another 40 is unknown.) As of December, more than 36,000 residents were unemployed — a 77% increase over the prior year.”

Washington Post: A year later, Washington region’s first coronavirus patient recounts trauma of her role in history

Washington Post: A year later, Washington region’s first coronavirus patient recounts trauma of her role in history. “A year ago this weekend, Bonnie Lippe picked up the telephone and broke down — again and again. One by one, she called family members and friends, asking them to watch out for symptoms of the deadly coronavirus because she might have exposed them. Lippe was the Washington region’s first known case. Or, as she put it half-jokingly, ‘patient zero.’”

DC Public Library: DC Public Library Adds Washington City Paper Archive

DC Public Library: DC Public Library Adds Washington City Paper Archive. “The Washington City Paper digital collection is being added to the Library’s People’s Archive. Washington City Paper has been Washington, D.C.’s principal alternative weekly newspaper since its first issue in February 1981, and focuses on local news and arts. The paper’s name has evolved over the years, from its original, ‘1981,’ to ‘City Paper’ in 1982, to ‘Washington City Paper’ in 1988. Notable writers who were once City Paper staffers include David Carr, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Jake Tapper, Katherine Boo, Clara Jeffery and Michael Schaffer.” The archive is still in progress, with issues from 1981 current available.

DCist: The Historian Behind ‘Chocolate City’ Wants You To Know How The Black Power Movement Reshaped D.C.

DCist: The Historian Behind ‘Chocolate City’ Wants You To Know How The Black Power Movement Reshaped D.C.. “[George Derek] Musgrove is the co-author, with Chris Myers Asch, of Chocolate City: A History of Race and Democracy in the Nation’s Capital. On Monday, the first day of Black History Month, Musgrove launched a new website that explores an antecedent to today’s Black Lives Matter movement and push for racial justice — the Black Power movement. Musgrove wanted to tell the story of how the District became a national center of Black Power organizing, just like New York, Los Angeles, Newark, and Chicago.”

Mapping Insecurity: Tracking Domestic Violent Extremism (The Soufan Center)

The Soufan Center: Mapping Insecurity: Tracking Domestic Violent Extremism . “The Mapping Insecurity project is an interactive tracker that will allow users to follow the law enforcement response to the January 6, 2021 insurrection at the Capitol, and will be updated to reflect the broader threat from domestic violent extremism. This initiative builds on longstanding work by The Soufan Center (TSC) to highlight the threat posed by domestic violent extremists, including white supremacists and violent anti-government groups. It includes a resource library of TSC publications and briefings, as well as an updated interactive map to track arrests across the United States, drawing on primary data provided by U.S. government sources.