Washington Post: Database of 231 videos exposes the horrors of war in Ukraine

Washington Post: Database of 231 videos exposes the horrors of war in Ukraine. “Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is one of the most documented wars ever. Citizens, public officials and soldiers have posted videos every day that show the dead bodies in neighborhoods, the trails of missiles streaking through the skies and the smoldering ruins of entire towns. The Washington Post’s visual forensics team started to verify and catalogue videos from the war the day Russia’s invasion began. This work is now searchable in a database that will be updated. The videos have been uploaded in raw format; graphic content is clearly marked.”

Opinion: Social media shouldn’t let China do Russia’s dirty work (Washington Post Editorial Board)

Washington Post Editorial Board: Opinion: Social media shouldn’t let China do Russia’s dirty work. “Social media sites chose fairly early on in the war to side against the aggressor, and made an impact by preventing RT, Sputnik and their cohorts from disseminating lies. The sites didn’t make this decision according to any broader principle about how to treat state-controlled media on their platforms. Yet China’s insistence on telling the more than 1 billion followers its channels command on Facebook that neo-Nazis running Ukraine bombed a children’s hospital, or that NATO is to blame for the fighting, offers an opportunity for just this sort of bright-line rule.”

ProPublica: Using Facebook’s Own Data to Understand the Platform’s Role in Jan. 6

ProPublica: Using Facebook’s Own Data to Understand the Platform’s Role in Jan. 6. “Computational journalist Jeff Kao and reporter Craig Silverman from ProPublica, along with Jeremy B. Merrill and Craig Timberg from The Washington Post, found that between Election Day 2020 and the Jan. 6 siege of the Capitol, Facebook groups exploded with at least 650,000 posts attacking the legitimacy of Joe Biden’s victory. The four journalists’ reporting provides some of the clearest evidence yet that Facebook was an important source of misinformation that led to the Jan. 6 attack. Here’s a look at how they did it.”

Opinion: How many people died believing vaccine misinformation? (Washington Post)

Washington Post: Opinion: How many people died believing vaccine misinformation?. “According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 1 in 5 eligible Americans have yet to get their first vaccine dose. Millions of people remain unvaccinated. They were 14 times more likely than the vaccinated to die of covid, as of December, the latest month for which data is available. How many of the 551,168 covid deaths in the United States since Jan. 1, 2021, could have been averted with vaccines? Too many. No more powerful case can be made than the voices of those who hesitated to get vaccinated and then faced the awful consequences. ”

Washington Post: Dive into the data behind the news with How To Read This Chart, a newsletter from Philip Bump

Washington Post: Dive into the data behind the news with How To Read This Chart, a newsletter from Philip Bump. “In How To Read This Chart, we’ll consider good charts, parse complex ones and discuss how bad ones might be improved. We’ll look at ways in which information might be conveyed more effectively with lines than words. Analyses of pop culture, politics, economics — anything where there’s a number in the news. I’ve done this for a while, having worked as a designer at the software company Adobe and spending years translating data from the news into visuals, so I’m confident in serving as your tour guide.”

Mediapost: ‘The Washington Post’ Launches ‘Post Opinions Simulator’ Ahead Of 2020 Election

MediaPost: ‘The Washington Post’ Launches ‘Post Opinions Simulator’ Ahead Of 2020 Election. “The Washington Post wants to make the 2020 Democratic primary and caucus season a little more interactive for its readers with a new tool called the Post Opinions Simulator. Through a proprietary, mathematical predictive model, the simulator allows user to adjust data like polling averages, fundraising numbers and amount of time remaining until Election Day and position five candidates against each other.”

Poynter: How The Washington Post’s TikTok guy Dave Jorgenson gets millions of views by being uncool

Poynter: How The Washington Post’s TikTok guy Dave Jorgenson gets millions of views by being uncool. “Spoiler alert: TikTok’s probably not going to save journalism. But 16.2 million people under 25 use the app, and users open it eight times a day for a total of 46 minutes, according to an investment pitch reported by Digiday. Jorgenson is confident that when the video-based service adds the ability to include links in video descriptions, it could be a funnel for new Post subscribers — and for news consumers everywhere.”

Nieman Lab: Ready to read the report?!? Despite decades of digital decay, The Washington Post’s 1998 copy of the Starr Report is still alive

Nieman Lab: Ready to read the report?!? Despite decades of digital decay, The Washington Post’s 1998 copy of the Starr Report is still alive. “As Attorney General William Barr fielded reporters at a presser (hours before releasing the actual report), the same ole Post link from 1998 made the rounds on Twitter. The only other complete file of it I could find was from the Government Publishing Office, available in plain text and PDF.”

Washington Post: The Washington Post announces plans to expand technology coverage

Washington Post: The Washington Post announces plans to expand technology coverage. “The Washington Post today announced plans to expand its technology coverage, adding 11 new positions for reporters, editors and videographers. The initiative will mean significant growth for The Post’s San Francisco bureau, where two technology reporters and one editor are now based. The bureau also will now house a video studio. Positions also will be added in Seattle and Washington, D.C.”

News n00bs: The quest for new audiences has taken The Washington Post to the streaming platform Twitch (NiemanLab)

NiemanLab: News n00bs: The quest for new audiences has taken The Washington Post to the streaming platform Twitch. “Twitch: It’s not just for Fortnite battle royales anymore. The Washington Post tried out broadcasting on the streaming platform best known for gaming yesterday with content related to politics — which is its own battle royale, really.”

Washington Post: More than 208,000 students have experienced gun violence at school since Columbine

Washington Post: More than 208,000 students have experienced gun violence at school since Columbine. “The Washington Post has spent the past year determining how many children have been exposed to gun violence during school hours since the Columbine High massacre in 1999. Beyond the dead and wounded, children who witness the violence or cower behind locked doors to hide from it can be profoundly traumatized. The federal government does not track school shootings, so The Post pieced together its numbers from news articles, open-source databases, law enforcement reports and calls to schools and police departments.”

Nieman Lab: A new feature in The Washington Post’s Opinion section will alert readers to opposite viewpoints (with the help of AI)

Nieman Lab: A new feature in The Washington Post’s Opinion section will alert readers to opposite viewpoints (with the help of AI) . “What’s the role of an opinion section in a newspaper today? The Washington Post argues that its role is to expose readers to new viewpoints. As such, the paper has launched a new online feature, Counterpoint, that ‘surfaces an Opinions article with a different perspective than what a user is currently reading.’”