Trade Secrets Trends: City Claims Google’s Water Use Is A Trade Secret and Exempt from Oregon’s Public Records Laws

Trade Secrets Trends: City Claims Google’s Water Use Is A Trade Secret and Exempt from Oregon’s Public Records Laws . “After a reporter from The Oregonian inquired into Google’s water use, the City of Dalles (‘Dalles’) filed a Complaint against both the reporter and the newspaper (the ‘Defendants’) seeking declaratory relief, requesting that the court declare Google’s water use a trade secret under Oregon’s Public Records Law, ORS 192.311 et seq, and the Oregon Uniform Trade Secrets Act, ORS 646.461 et seq. As described below, the issue is whether Google’s water use is a trade secret, and if so, if the public interest exception, which may permit public disclosure of trade secrets, applies.”

University of Texas at Austin: First Global River Database Documents 40 Years of Change

University of Texas at Austin: First Global River Database Documents 40 Years of Change. “The database, created by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin, uses publicly available remote sensing data to show how the river centerlines of the world’s 48 most threatened deltas have moved during the past 40 years. The data can be used to predict how rivers will continue to move over time and help governments manage population density and future development.”

OpenET: A Satellite-Based Water Data Resource (NASA)

NASA: OpenET: A Satellite-Based Water Data Resource. “OpenET uses open-source models and Google Earth Engine to provide satellite-based information on water consumption in areas as small as a quarter of an acre at daily, monthly and yearly intervals. Until OpenET, there was no single, low-cost operational system for measuring and distributing evapotranspiration data at the scale of individual fields across the western United States.”

PR Newswire: NASA Invites Media to Briefing on New Water Data Platform (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: NASA Invites Media to Briefing on New Water Data Platform (PRESS RELEASE). “NASA will hold a virtual media briefing at 1:30 p.m. EDT Thursday, Oct. 21, to share a powerful, new, web-based platform to help those who rely on water resources across the drought-stricken western U.S. Building on more than two decades of research, OpenET puts NASA data into the hands of farmers, water managers, conservation groups, and others to accelerate improvements and innovations in water management.”

Star Herald (Nebraska): Users can use new website to check groundwater quality, chemical content

Star Herald (Nebraska): Users can use new website to check groundwater quality, chemical content. “The Nebraska Department of Environment and Energy launched the Nebraska Groundwater Quality Clearinghouse earlier this week. With more than 1.6 million sample results from some 33,000 irrigation well locations, the website is the culmination of decades worth of sampling and research.”

Orlando urges reduced water usage; liquid oxygen used to treat water is needed for COVID patients (Orlando Sentinel)

Orlando Sentinel: Orlando urges reduced water usage; liquid oxygen used to treat water is needed for COVID patients. “The city of Orlando and its water utility on Friday appealed to residents to cut back sharply on water usage for at least several weeks because of a pandemic-triggered shortage of liquid oxygen used to treat water. Orlando Utilities Commission consumes 10 tankers of liquid oxygen each week to remove odor and color from water. A sharp increase in the usage of liquid oxygen by hospitals in treating COVID-19 patients has resulted in short supplies for other uses.”

UPI: New website allows users to track mesmerizing journey of a raindrop

UPI: New website allows users to track mesmerizing journey of a raindrop. “A Pittsburgh web developer has made a website that allows anyone to trace the path of a raindrop that falls in the contiguous United States from when it lands on the ground to its final destination and everything in between.” I played with this a little bit. If you try to zoom way in on the map of the US, it’ll slow your computer down. If you just click on the map instead of zooming, it works better.

California Department of Water Resources: State Develops Tool and Recommendations to Support Those Most Vulnerable to Drought

California Department of Water Resources: State Develops Tool and Recommendations to Support Those Most Vulnerable to Drought. “DWR led a two-year process learning from stakeholder experiences about what puts small water systems and rural communities at higher risk of water shortages and what is needed to build their resilience to drought. The final report is now available online and could inform future legislation and efforts to help small water suppliers and rural communities reduce their risk of inadequate water supply amid a drought or other extreme event…. In addition to the report, a new online tool has been finalized that enables small water suppliers and rural communities to explore their relative risk of water shortage.”

Arizona State University: New ASU mapping tool shows holistic view of water in Arizona

Arizona State University: New ASU mapping tool shows holistic view of water in Arizona. “Water is a critical issue in Arizona, and a new water-mapping tool created by the Kyl Center for Water Policy at Arizona State University has collected a vast array of maps and data sets to show a wide-ranging view of water in the state. The Arizona Water Blueprint visualizes information on groundwater, rivers, agricultural irrigation, dams, ocean desalination, critical species and other concepts that are important not only to policymakers but also to any Arizonan concerned about water.”

New Atlas: NASA’s first global groundwater maps reveal drought in remote areas

New Atlas: NASA’s first global groundwater maps reveal drought in remote areas. “While a drought may quickly become evident in inhabited regions that depend on regular rain, when remote parts of the world undergo a dry spell it might not become obvious for a long time, if ever. To build a more complete picture of drought-stricken areas, NASA has developed its first global groundwater map, which it hopes will become useful way of monitoring water supplies as the world contends with ever-hotter temperatures.”

EurekAlert: Global database for Karst spring discharges

EurekAlert: Global database for Karst spring discharges. “Previous research on karst hydrology has concentrated on the local level and the respective catchment areas. Very few studies have taken into account how climate and land use changes affect karst water resources on a large scale. Scientists have not been able to draw on sufficient observational data for this. The new database contains more than 400 karst spring discharge data, which represents the highest number of observations of karst springs worldwide. For the study, the Freiburg researchers and more than 50 co-authors reviewed articles, reports and national hydrological databases and compiled the observations.”

KSBW: New online interactive tool helps Californians prepare for future drought

KSBW: New online interactive tool helps Californians prepare for future drought. “This rain-year has brought an alarmingly dry winter in California so far, according to climate change experts. Now, there’s a new tool to help Californians navigate your water supply. It’s an online toll that allows a person to see the groundwater levels in their area. The tool then gives a representation of what could be at risk or impacted if a drought hits.” Pretty sure that first “online toll” should be “online tool.”

Penn State News: Citizen scientists may be an untapped resource for water quality improvement

Penn State News: Citizen scientists may be an untapped resource for water quality improvement. “Raising awareness and offering technological tools to the thousands of citizens groups in the U.S. that monitor water quality might help community leaders tap these volunteers as a way to improve access to plentiful, clean water and possibly avoid water-related crises, according to a team of researchers.”