EWG: PFAS Chemicals Must Be Regulated as a Class, Not One by One (Environmental Working Group)

EWG: EWG: PFAS Chemicals Must Be Regulated as a Class, Not One by One. “The known extent of contamination of American communities with the toxic fluorinated compounds known as PFAS continues to grow at an alarming rate, with no end in sight. As of March 2019, at least 610 locations in 43 states are known to be contaminated, including drinking water systems serving an estimated 19 million people.”

State of Michigan: New Study Guide Enables Educators to Teach the Lessons of Flint

State of Michigan: New Study Guide Enables Educators to Teach the Lessons of Flint. “‘Here’s to Flint.’ With that line, the city of Flint officially shut off the water flowing from Detroit and shifted to pulling its drinking water from the Flint River. The date was April 25, 2014. Five years later, the Michigan Department of Civil Rights has released a new study guide designed to help educators teach the lessons of the Flint water crisis.”

Google Blog: A new app to map and monitor the world’s freshwater supply

Google Blog: A new app to map and monitor the world’s freshwater supply. “Today, on World Water Day, we’re proud to showcase a new platform enabling all countries to freely measure and monitor when and where water is changing: UN’s Water-Related Ecosystems, or sdg661.app. Released last week in Nairobi at the UN Environment Assembly (UNEA), the app provides statistics for every country’s annual surface water (like lakes and rivers). It also shows changes from 1984 through 2018 through interactive maps, graphs and full-data downloads.”

Lifehacker: Eject Water From Your Phone’s Speakers After an Unexpected Dunk Using This Web Tool

Lifehacker: Eject Water From Your Phone’s Speakers After an Unexpected Dunk Using This Web Tool. “Fix My Speakers is a web app that works similarly to the Apple’s Watch’s built-in water ejection feature. With it, you press a button and the phone plays a specific tone that helps generate sounds waves that eject all that water from your phone.” Interesting. I have not tried this.

The Atlantic: How a Feel-Good AI Story Went Wrong in Flint

The Atlantic: How a Feel-Good AI Story Went Wrong in Flint. “More than a thousand days after the water problems in Flint, Michigan, became national news, thousands of homes in the city still have lead pipes, from which the toxic metal can leach into the water supply. To remedy the problem, the lead pipes need to be replaced with safer, copper ones. That sounds straightforward, but it is a challenge to figure out which homes have lead pipes in the first place. The City’s records are incomplete and inaccurate. And digging up all the pipes would be costly and time-consuming. That’s just the kind of problem that automation is supposed to help solve.”

New York Review of Books: ‘Oceania,’ Art of the Islands

New York Review of Books: ‘Oceania,’ Art of the Islands. “‘Oceania’ is not the historical, ethnographic show that Western museum-goers might expect. At the entrance a shimmering wave of blue material cascades from the ceiling. Titled Kiko Moana, this flowing wave uses ancient techniques of weaving, embroidery, layering, and cutting, but it’s a contemporary work in polyethylene and cotton, created by four Maori women from the Mata Aho Collective in New Zealand who have also compiled an online archive of stories about the supernatural spirits of the waters. Old and new technologies meet.”

EurekAlert: Will there be enough water in the future?

EurekAlert: Will there be enough water in the future?. “Water researchers at Aalto University wanted to better communicate research findings to a broader audience. The Water Scarcity Atlas, a web application created by Postdoctoral Researcher Joseph Guillaume and Assistant Professor Matti Kummu, uses interactive global maps to provide an introduction to the problems that arise with limited water – water scarcity – and ways to fight them.”