BusinessWire: Esri, UN, and GEO Blue Planet Release Water Health Tool (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Esri, UN, and GEO Blue Planet Release Water Health Tool (PRESS RELEASE). “This project empowers countries, especially developing nations, with the information they need to understand potential impacts on coastal water quality, address those impacts, and have routinely updated data to understand and report their progress to the United Nations as part of the SDG initiative. While governments and organizations around the world are already able to conduct these analyses, this project transforms the raw global data into actionable information to make it easier for them to make better-informed decisions.”

EurekAlert: Is your drinking water toxic? This app may help you find out

EurekAlert: Is your drinking water toxic? This app may help you find out. “Exposure to hydraulic fracturing fluid in drinking water has been shown to increase the risk of respiratory problems, premature births, congenital heart defects, and other medical problems. But not all wells are created equal…. Now, a new, interactive tool created by Penn Medicine researchers allows community members and scientists to find out which toxins may be lurking in their drinking water as a result of fracking.”

Oceanographic: New publicly available water quality database contains information on 12,000 global lakes

Oceanographic: New publicly available water quality database contains information on 12,000 global lakes. “York University (Toronto, Canada) researchers have created a free and publicly available water quality database containing information on close to 12,000 freshwater lakes globally – almost half of the world’s freshwater supply. The hope is that the database will help scientists monitor and manage the health of these lakes. The study includes data for lakes in 72 countries, from Antarctica to the United States and Canada.”

Down to Earth: New database shows how large rivers form the basis of global borders

Down to Earth: New database shows how large rivers form the basis of global borders. “Rivers have historically provided humans with fresh water, fertile land and food and have, thus, formed the bedrock of several civilisations. A new database, however, quantified how rivers were used to divide land and form international, national and local borders. Rivers make up 23 per cent of international borders, 17 per cent of the world’s state and provincial borders and 12 per cent of all county-level local borders, according to the Global Subnational River-Borders database.” The dataset is available here.

CKPGToday: New interactive map allows British Columbians to view river quality trends across B.C.

CKPGToday: New interactive map allows British Columbians to view river quality trends across B.C.. “Using an interactive map of B.C., people will now be able to view 10-year water quality trends in certain rivers with data compiled from the Canada-B.C. Water Quality Monitoring Program. The program has been in place since 1985. Data collected is also used to determine the current status of water quality, detect emerging issues that may threaten aquatic life and support the development of guidelines for water, fish and sediment.”

Arizona State University: Research shows water quality could diminish in closed buildings during COVID-19 pandemic

Arizona State University: Research shows water quality could diminish in closed buildings during COVID-19 pandemic. “While bars, gyms, dine-in restaurants and other buildings have been closed to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, water left sitting in pipes could change in quality. It’s possible that water left sitting for long periods of time could contain excessive amounts of heavy metals and pathogens concentrated in pipes nationwide, say researchers who have begun a field study on the impact of a pandemic shutdown on buildings.”

Carlsbad Current Argus: NMSU gets state funding to digitize and create maps of water rights

Carlsbad Current Argus: NMSU gets state funding to digitize and create maps of water rights. “Under New Mexico water law, all ground and surface waters belong to the public but they are subject to appropriation under the Water Resources Allocation Program. Under this program, the Office of the State Engineer is tasked with keeping track of these water rights. Thanks to a grant from the state engineer, New Mexico State University will be digitizing the state’s water rights database in map form by the new completion date, the end of the year, due to delays with COVID-19.”

PR Newswire: OmniSci Powers New Website Enabling Public to View House-by-House Information On Flint Water Crisis (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: OmniSci Powers New Website Enabling Public to View House-by-House Information On Flint Water Crisis (PRESS RELEASE). ” OmniSci, the pioneer in accelerated analytics, working in close partnership with water infrastructure analytics consulting company BlueConduit, today announced the debut of Flint Service Line Map (www.flintpipemap.org), a public website that maps up-to-date information about residential water service line replacements in the city of Flint, Michigan. These water service lines are the pipes that deliver each home their water. If the pipes are made of lead, they can contaminate that home’s water with lead. The problem: Flint, like most other cities, did not know exactly which pipes were lead. Presented in house-by-house detail, the map allows residents to easily find out about their known or likely water service line material, along with repair dates and other useful information.”

Arizona State University: New ASU mapping tool shows holistic view of water in Arizona

Arizona State University: New ASU mapping tool shows holistic view of water in Arizona. “Water is a critical issue in Arizona, and a new water-mapping tool created by the Kyl Center for Water Policy at Arizona State University has collected a vast array of maps and data sets to show a wide-ranging view of water in the state. The Arizona Water Blueprint visualizes information on groundwater, rivers, agricultural irrigation, dams, ocean desalination, critical species and other concepts that are important not only to policymakers but also to any Arizonan concerned about water.”

Arizona State University: Limited access to water can increase COVID-19 risks

Arizona State University: Limited access to water can increase COVID-19 risks. “Arizona State University School of Human Evolution and Social Change President’s Professor Amber Wutich co-authored an article citing reasons why households with unstable access to water may be more at risk for COVID-19. Beyond being unable to wash one’s hands frequently, water-sharing is common in communities with limited access to water, meaning increased contact in people’s homes or at public water sources. The article references a spike in COVID-19 in communities with limited water service within the Navajo Nation.”

USDA: Tips for Handwashing When Running Water is Not Accessible

USDA: Tips for Handwashing When Running Water is Not Accessible. “By now, many of us have heard several times that washing hands with soap and water is an effective way to get rid of germs, including those that cause foodborne illness. We are advised to wash our hands often, especially before and after handling food. This advice is easy to follow when we have access to clean, running water. But how do you wash your hands if you find that clean, running water is out of reach?”

AP: Virus spread feared where water is scarce around the world

AP: Virus spread feared where water is scarce around the world. “Violet Manuel hastily abandoned her uncle’s funeral and grabbed two empty containers when she heard a boy running down the dirt road shouting, ‘Water, water, water!’ The 72-year-old joined dozens of people seeking their daily ration in Zimbabwe’s densely populated town of Chitungwiza. ‘Social distancing here?’ Manuel asked tartly. She sighed with relief after getting her allotment of 40 liters (10.5 gallons) but worried about the coronavirus.”

New Atlas: NASA’s first global groundwater maps reveal drought in remote areas

New Atlas: NASA’s first global groundwater maps reveal drought in remote areas. “While a drought may quickly become evident in inhabited regions that depend on regular rain, when remote parts of the world undergo a dry spell it might not become obvious for a long time, if ever. To build a more complete picture of drought-stricken areas, NASA has developed its first global groundwater map, which it hopes will become useful way of monitoring water supplies as the world contends with ever-hotter temperatures.”

EurekAlert: Global database for Karst spring discharges

EurekAlert: Global database for Karst spring discharges. “Previous research on karst hydrology has concentrated on the local level and the respective catchment areas. Very few studies have taken into account how climate and land use changes affect karst water resources on a large scale. Scientists have not been able to draw on sufficient observational data for this. The new database contains more than 400 karst spring discharge data, which represents the highest number of observations of karst springs worldwide. For the study, the Freiburg researchers and more than 50 co-authors reviewed articles, reports and national hydrological databases and compiled the observations.”