Super-Concierge Doctors, High-Design Home Classrooms, and Catered Backyard Dinners: Lifestyles of the Rich and Quarantined (Washingtonian)

Washingtonian: Super-Concierge Doctors, High-Design Home Classrooms, and Catered Backyard Dinners: Lifestyles of the Rich and Quarantined. “Dr. Brown said he would charter the plane himself. He was nervous—the patients wanted him at their summer home in St. Michaels to screen them for Covid immediately. But it was a Thursday in summer, and driving would take forever. Forget about taking the car. Instead, Ernest Brown, owner of Doctors to You, a Washington-area concierge-medicine group whose house-yacht/private-jet calls start at $600 a pop, drove to Gaithersburg and hopped a puddle jumper to the airport in Easton. The patients, who needed to be screened in order to meet with another VIP, sent a car to meet him. All told, Brown was at their waterfront estate for ten minutes, max. Results: negative.”

ABC News: The wealth of billionaires hit a new record high of $10.2 trillion as pandemic raged

ABC News: The wealth of billionaires hit a new record high of $10.2 trillion as pandemic raged. “The wealth of the world’s billionaires soared to a record new high of $10.2 trillion at the end of July as the coronavirus pandemic raged, according to a new report published Wednesday from Swiss bank UBS and the global firm PwC.”

Data analysis: How the poorest countries are losing out on Covid-19 relief funds (New Statesman)

New Statesman: Data analysis: How the poorest countries are losing out on Covid-19 relief funds. “New Statesman analysis suggests some countries with a higher GDP per capita have been allocated more international funding to fight the virus than poorer nations.”

The Atlantic: Normalcy for Some, Apocalypse for Others

The Atlantic: Normalcy for Some, Apocalypse for Others. “The pandemic recession has erased trillions of dollars of economic activity and pushed the jobless rate to 8.4 percent, with one in 10 Americans currently drawing unemployment-insurance payments. But it has not been evenly distributed. Big companies and rich families have largely recovered, whereas mom-and-pops and the moms and pops who run them are living through a second Great Depression.”

Futurity: Utility Shut-offs, Evictions More Likely For Households Of Color

Futurity: Utility Shut-offs, Evictions More Likely For Households Of Color. “Researchers from the Indiana University O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs surveyed more than 1,800 Americans at or below 200% of the federal poverty line. The survey, which professors Sanya Carley and David Konisky conducted, is the second wave of the ‘Survey of Household Energy Insecurity in Time of COVID.’ In June they released the first batch of data, which both highlighted and foreshadowed significant problems with vulnerable populations’ ability to pay utility bills, put food on their tables, and remain in their homes.”

Washington Post: The covid-19 recession is the most unequal in modern U.S. history

Washington Post: The covid-19 recession is the most unequal in modern U.S. history. “Job losses from the pandemic overwhelmingly affected low-wage, minority workers most. Seven months into the recovery, Black women, Black men and mothers of school-age children are taking the longest time to regain their employment.”

NPR: Artists Turn GoFundMe Comments Into A ‘Get Well Soon!’ Card For A Sick System

Sometimes you read an article that just punches you in the pit of your stomach. NPR: Artists Turn GoFundMe Comments Into A ‘Get Well Soon!’ Card For A Sick System. “The popular crowdsourcing site GoFundMe is a go-to place to appeal for help with rent, medicine, child care and favorite causes. Along with donations, supporters leave comments ranging from ‘Can’t wait for you to have the glasses you need!’ to ‘Best of everything big guy,’ to simply ‘Get well soon!’ Artists Sam Lavigne and Tega Brain have turned those well wishes into an artwork called Get Well Soon! It consists of more than 200,000 comments scraped from GoFundMe and arranged alphabetically in relentless rows of hope, cheer and sympathy.”

ProPublica: The Big Corporate Rescue and the America That’s Too Small to Save

ProPublica: The Big Corporate Rescue and the America That’s Too Small to Save. “Girish Patel doubts his small, 20-year-old shop will survive the pandemic economy. Thirty stories above, aerospace company TransDigm has sustained eye-popping profits thanks to steep layoffs and raised over a billion with help from the U.S. government.”

Half of households in 4 largest US cities report financial problems due to pandemic: POLL (ABC News)

ABC News: Half of households in 4 largest US cities report financial problems due to pandemic: POLL. “Americans already enduring the most frayed financial safety nets now find themselves on the fault lines exacerbated by the novel coronavirus. New polling reveals the strain born by families caught in the crosshairs of several issues converging on the country: COVID-19 and systemic racial, socioeconomic and health inequality.”

Business Wire: Teaching Our Way to a More Equitable Economy (PRESS RELEASE)

Business Wire: Teaching Our Way to a More Equitable Economy (PRESS RELEASE). “Rutgers University today unveiled a major redesign of the world’s only online library dedicated to employee share ownership, a business model that can reduce wealth inequality in America and help save jobs during the COVID-19 recession. The newly relaunched Curriculum Library for Employee Ownership (CLEO) features more than 600 resources designed to help college professors teach about employee share ownership in their classes. It is also a valuable resource for company leaders, researchers, and the public.”

Wall Street Journal: Summer Camp Canceled Because of Coronavirus? Not for These Hamptons Homeowners

Wall Street Journal: Summer Camp Canceled Because of Coronavirus? Not for These Hamptons Homeowners. “When Camp Takajo, the famed Maine sleep-away camp, announced it wouldn’t open this summer due to Covid concerns, many parents panicked at the thought of having their children remain at home after months of lockdown. But real-estate developer Jeff Greene, who has three young sons, jumped into action. He decided to turn his 55-acre North Haven, N.Y., compound, which includes a main house and five smaller buildings, into a private outpost of the summer camp. His first order of business was to call Takajo’s owner and arrange to hire his top staff, including the nature and wilderness counselor, arts and crafts specialist, tennis coach, and since Mr. Greene’s property sits on 3,000 feet of Sag Harbor Bay, the waterfront director.”

$25,000 Pod Schools: How Well-to-Do Children Will Weather the Pandemic (New York Times)

New York Times: $25,000 Pod Schools: How Well-to-Do Children Will Weather the Pandemic. “This fall, a majority of 50 million American children enrolled in public school are almost certainly going to be confined within their homes for part or all of the school day. The numerous harms of being kept out of school — academic, social, emotional, psychological, physical — are felt by all children, but a disproportionate weight will be borne by those with the least resources. The wealthiest children will be ensconced in private schools and catered to by tutors and nannies. For most, there are few options. But for a slice of enterprising American parents with resources, so-called pod schools have arrived.”

San Francisco Chronicle: Bay Area parents rush to form ‘pandemic pods’ for the school year. The backlash is fierce

San Francisco Chronicle: Bay Area parents rush to form ‘pandemic pods’ for the school year. The backlash is fierce. “In the past week alone, tens of thousands of families in the Bay Area and across the country have found each other on Facebook, created contact lists organized by city or school, and formed ‘pandemic pods’ — in some cases offering educators $100 an hour or more to tutor or teach small groups in the homes of the children or the teachers. Then came the backlash.”