Route Fifty: Cities Brace For ‘Collision Course’ Of Heat Waves And COVID-19

Route Fifty: Cities Brace For ‘Collision Course’ Of Heat Waves And COVID-19. “Across the country, authorities are finding that their usual strategies for protecting people against heat-related health problems are in direct conflict with their strategies for containing the coronavirus.”

WUWM: New Database Helps Scientists Track Climate Change Over Thousands Of Years

WUWM: New Database Helps Scientists Track Climate Change Over Thousands Of Years. “The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released a new database earlier this month. It’s called Nature’s Archives, and NOAA says it’s the most comprehensive temperature change database ever assembled. Paul Roebber, a UWM distinguished professor of atmospheric science, says NOAA’s data gives context to changes climate scientists are observing.”

Weather .com: Here’s Which Type of Billion-Dollar Weather Disaster Has Occurred Most Frequently in Each State Since 1980

Weather .com: Here’s Which Type of Billion-Dollar Weather Disaster Has Occurred Most Frequently in Each State Since 1980. “Billion-dollar weather and climate disasters, such as those from severe thunderstorms, wildfires and tropical cyclones, have affected every U.S. state since 1980, and a new tool developed by NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) shows us how often each type of disaster has occurred in each state over the last 40 years.”

Coronavirus News: Warmer weather, humidity and COVID-19 (WTVD)

WTVD: Coronavirus News: Warmer weather, humidity and COVID-19. “While COVID-19 has been spreading like wildfire in locations like Italy and New York, other areas have seen a much more gradual uptick in cases. Public health policy may very well be stemming the tide of the virus in those places, but the weather could also be playing a role. An early analysis by scientists at MIT has found that the novel coronavirus is spreading more slowly in warmer and more humid climates. At least two other studies have drawn a similar conclusion, including one conducted in China before the aggressive lockdown began.” This is a note of hope, not a license to go outside and be stupid.

Government News (Australia): Shade mapping tool helps pedestrians dodge heat

Government News (Australia): Shade mapping tool helps pedestrians dodge heat. “With the mercury recently hitting 45C in Bendigo, Council has adopted a new tool which helps residents seek out routes with the most shade coverage and avoid the heat. The Shadeways tool, developed by researchers from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, uses satellite imagery to generate a ‘temperature likelihood’ monitor. By analysing surfaces and vegetation type, it creates an urban heat map and generates suggested shaded routes.”

Ars Technica: How Google researchers used neural networks to make weather forecasts

Ars Technica: How Google researchers used neural networks to make weather forecasts. “The researchers say their results are a dramatic improvement over previous techniques in two key ways. One is speed. Google says that leading weather forecasting models today take one to three hours to run, making them useless if you want a weather forecast an hour in the future. By contrast, Google says its system can produce results in less than 10 minutes—including the time to collect data from sensors around the United States.”

Phys .org: The conservation of cultural heritage in the face of climate catastrophe

Phys .org: The conservation of cultural heritage in the face of climate catastrophe. “Cultural heritage can be destroyed. It can decay. Once it is gone, it is gone forever, sadly. Writing in the International Journal of Global Warming, Portuguese researchers discuss the potential impact of climate change on cultural heritage and how we might lose artifacts as extreme weather has a worsening impact on our world.”

SF Gate: Old journals shed light on climate change

SF Gate: Old journals shed light on climate change. “n the 1940s and 1950s, the hunting guide L.S. Quackenbush lived in a cabin in remote Oxbow, Maine. He rented cabins to hunters, cut, stacked and split wood and used his daily walks to keep detailed notes on the spring arrivals of songbirds and the first appearances of flowers and tree leaves. His journals meticulously documenting the changing seasons grew and grew, eventually totaling more than 5,000 pages. Now they are filling gaps on how trees and migratory birds are responding to a changing climate in northern Maine, where historical data is sparse.”

MakeUseOf: How You Can Prepare for Winter Storms With These Apps and Websites

MakeUseOf: How You Can Prepare for Winter Storms With These Apps and Websites. “What if you still want to go out and enjoy the season in this bad weather? Is there any way to avoid those bad roads without becoming a hermit during the colder winter months? Here’s how to use technology to avoid winter storms, ranging from apps to websites.” Advanced users won’t find anything new here, but good basics to share.

Big data, big world: new NOAA datasets available on Google Cloud (Google Cloud)

Google Cloud: Big data, big world: new NOAA datasets available on Google Cloud. “A vast trove of NOAA’s environmental data is now available on Google Cloud as part of the Google Cloud Public Datasets Program and NOAA’s Big Data Project, opening up possibilities for scientific and economic advances. We are thrilled to make this valuable data available for your exploration. Google Cloud will host 5 PB of this data across our products, including BigQuery, Cloud Storage, Google Earth Engine, and Kaggle. The stored data is available at no cost, though usual charges may still apply (processing, egress of user-owned data, for example).”

NIWA: The week it snowed everywhere

NIWA: The week it snowed everywhere. “NIWA and Microsoft Corp. are teaming up to make artificial intelligence handwriting recognition more accurate and efficient in a project that will support climate research. The project aims to develop better training sets for handwriting recognition technology that will ‘read’ old weather logs. The first step is to use weather information recorded during a week in July 1939 when it snowed all over New Zealand, including at Cape Reinga.”

Phys .org: Recreating Earth through code

Phys .org: Recreating Earth through code. “The first Earth System Model developed and based in Africa are creating one of the most reliable and most detailed modulations of climate change. What does it take to recreate Earth? A couple of thousands of line of code, throw in some data from all the weather stations around the world, and a supercomputer.”

EurekAlert: Using AI to predict where and when lightning will strike

EurekAlert: Using AI to predict where and when lightning will strike. “At EPFL’s School of Engineering, researchers in the Electromagnetic Compatibility Laboratory, led by Farhad Rachidi, have developed a simple and inexpensive system that can predict when lightning will strike to the nearest 10 to 30 minutes, within a 30-kilometer radius. The system uses a combination of standard meteorological data and artificial intelligence.”

Phys .org: Deep learning application able to predict El Niño events up to 18 months in advance

Phys .org: Deep learning application able to predict El Niño events up to 18 months in advance. “A trio of researchers from Chonnam National University, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has found that a deep learning convolutional neural network was able to accurately predict El Niño events up to 18 months in advance.”

EOS: Finding Faces in Hailstorms

EOS: Finding Faces in Hailstorms. “Hail can be among the most damaging of severe weather phenomena, but predicting whether a passing thunderstorm might start spitting pea-sized (or golf ball–sized) hailstones is notoriously difficult. A new approach using machine learning techniques related to facial recognition technology is giving meteorologists a new tool for mapping how various components of a storm might add up to dangerous hail conditions.”