The Texas Tribune: How to help and get help in Texas as the winter storm causes power outages

The Texas Tribune: How to help and get help in Texas as the winter storm causes power outages. “Millions of Texans are without power, heat and essential services during a winter storm that has led to freezing temperatures and hazardous road conditions throughout the state. City officials, local outreach teams and other organizations are providing warming shelters and support for people seeking help. Many nonprofit organizations are also asking for donations so they can help people experiencing homelessness or those who are in need of support. Here’s a list of the resources being offered in cities across the state.”

King5: Digital tool shows Pacific Northwest snow depth, past and present

King5: Digital tool shows Pacific Northwest snow depth, past and present. “Weather professionals and outdoor recreationists now have a new tool they can use to compare current and historical snow depths at nine different sites in the Pacific Northwest. The new interactive website lets users compare measurements from nine monitoring sites in Washington and two in Oregon. It allows the user to compare the differences in mountain snow depth from one season to the next and create a graphic of their results.”

Washington Post: Weather Service faces backlash after launching ‘slow,’ ‘unusable’ radar website

Washington Post: Weather Service faces backlash after launching ‘slow,’ ‘unusable’ radar website. “Last week, the National Weather Service launched its first new website for radar imagery since the early 2000s, touting it as a ‘major upgrade.’ The public did not see it that way. ‘Horrible,’ ‘really low quality work,’ ‘very very buggy,’ ‘unusable,’ ‘absolutely terrible,’ ‘not ready for public release,’ ‘garbage’ and ‘the worst’ represent a sample of complaints from users on social media since the radar.weather.gov site went live.”

Washington Post: Weather Service faces Internet bandwidth shortage, proposes limiting key data

Washington Post: Weather Service faces Internet bandwidth shortage, proposes limiting key data. “For the past decade, the National Weather Service has been plagued by failures in disseminating critical forecast and warning information that is aimed at protecting lives and saving property. In some cases, its websites have gone down during severe weather events, unable to handle the demand.”

Bing Blogs: Plan your day or week confidently with new forecasts from MSN Weather

Bing Blogs: Plan your day or week confidently with new forecasts from MSN Weather. “With so many things that feel outside our control, it’s helpful to know what to expect outside. Whether you are looking for the best time to take a run, planning a road trip, or chasing powder for a ski day, MSN Weather can help. Our new experience delivers accurate, state-of-the-art forecasts; interactive, animated maps that make the weather easy to understand; and timely weather notifications and news for severe weather events.”

Aberdeen News: Website’s new weather tool to aid farmers in 12 states

Aberdeen News: Website’s new weather tool to aid farmers in 12 states. “Iowa State University Extension and Outreach has debuted a new tool on the Forecast and Assessment of Cropping Systems (FACTS) website that displays weather summaries for every crop reporting district in 12 Midwest states. The weather summaries include data from 1984 through today, updated every month and with information on temperature, precipitation, radiation and other weather indicators — like the number of days with extreme weather rain events, or the number of warm nights.”

Cosmos Magazine: Renewed interest in weathered records

Cosmos Magazine: Renewed interest in weathered records. “Each week Cosmos takes a look at projects and news about citizen science in Australia. This week, we report on a new initiative launched by Climate History Australia at the Australian National University (ANU). Scientists at ANU have an ambition to create Australia’s longest daily weather record, beginning in 1838, and they’d like help from citizen scientists.”

NOAA Climate Program Office: Alaska RISA launches Alaska Statewide Temperature Index Tool

NOAA Climate Program Office: Alaska RISA launches Alaska Statewide Temperature Index Tool. “Built in collaboration with the Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning, the new tool uses a statewide temperature index developed by ACCAP Climate Specialist Rick Thoman, and NOAA Climatologist Brian Brettschneider. The index uses daily temperature data from 25 Automated Surface Observation System stations maintained by the National Weather Service. Daily indices can then be compared to a baseline of average temperature data from 1981 to 2010. The project team hopes that this tool can help clarify the complex topic of Alaska temperature.”

NPR: Tidal Wave’ Of Power Shut-Offs Looms As Nation Grapples With Heat

NPR: ‘Tidal Wave’ Of Power Shut-Offs Looms As Nation Grapples With Heat. “Wykeisha Howe is trying to be thrifty. When her kids are uncomfortable in the sweltering Atlanta heat, she gives them freeze pops. Instead of cranking up the air conditioner, she uses a fan. Lunch and dinner are cooked at the same time, so the electric stove doesn’t have to be turned on twice. ‘I try my best to manage and ration out things as best as possible,’ she says. Still, Howe, who has five kids living at home, is about a month and a half behind on her electric bill. ”

North Carolina State University: Climate Thresholds Tool Offers Historical Stats About Extreme Events

North Carolina State University, go Wolfpack, and we miss you Kay Yow: Climate Thresholds Tool Offers Historical Stats About Extreme Events. “They’re the sort of climatological curiosities that may have crossed your mind this year without even realizing it. In the Sandhills: Wow, 90 degrees before March is done? Here comes the sun! In the Foothills: A freeze in mid-May? No way! And in eastern North Carolina last month: Four inches of rain in one day? Don’t float away! If recent weather has left you wondering about the rarity of such events, or if you’re planning ahead for what sort of conditions you might expect at a different time of year, our relaunched and refreshed Climate Thresholds tool can provide the answers.”

WUWM: New Database Helps Scientists Track Climate Change Over Thousands Of Years

WUWM: New Database Helps Scientists Track Climate Change Over Thousands Of Years. “The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released a new database earlier this month. It’s called Nature’s Archives, and NOAA says it’s the most comprehensive temperature change database ever assembled. Paul Roebber, a UWM distinguished professor of atmospheric science, says NOAA’s data gives context to changes climate scientists are observing.”