BetaNews: Avast releases ‘Aspen’, its most secure browser to date

BetaNews: Avast releases ‘Aspen’, its most secure browser to date. “People tell us they are becoming increasingly wary of using third-party browsers such as those from Opera, Chrome and Firefox. It might come as a surprise, but many average users will opt to stick with their default OS browser, Edge, and a powerful security suite to keep themselves secure. The question is, is this the most secure way of surfing the web in 2019? Could the connection between your computer and the internet be made more rock solid? Well, Avast certainly thinks so.”

MakeUseOf: You Can Now Try the CERN Web Browser From 1990

MakeUseOf: You Can Now Try the CERN Web Browser From 1990. “CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) has rebuilt what was essentially the first web browser in the world. This means you can now see what surfing the World Wide Web was like back in 1990, using an application fittingly called WorldWideWeb.”

Ars Technica: Opera shows off its smart new redesign that’s just like all the other browsers

Ars Technica: Opera shows off its smart new redesign that’s just like all the other browsers. “Being Web-centric is not a bad principle for an application such as a browser, where the bulk of the functionality and interest comes from the pages we’re viewing rather than the browser itself. At first blush, I think that Opera has come up with something that looks good, but it does feel like an awfully familiar design rationale.”

Mozilla Blog: Goodbye, EdgeHTML

Mozilla Blog: Goodbye, EdgeHTML. “By adopting Chromium, Microsoft hands over control of even more of online life to Google. This may sound melodramatic, but it’s not. The ‘browser engines’ — Chromium from Google and Gecko Quantum from Mozilla — are ‘inside baseball’ pieces of software that actually determine a great deal of what each of us can do online. They determine core capabilities such as which content we as consumers can see, how secure we are when we watch content, and how much control we have over what websites and services can do to us. Microsoft’s decision gives Google more ability to single-handedly decide what possibilities are available to each one of us.”

The Verge: Microsoft is building its own Chrome browser to replace Edge

The Verge: Microsoft is building its own Chrome browser to replace Edge. “Microsoft is building its own Chromium browser to replace the default on Windows 10. The software giant first introduced its Edge browser three years ago, with a redesign to replace Internet Explorer and modernize the default browsing experience to compete with Chrome and others. While the modern look and feel has paid off for Edge, the underlying browser engine (EdgeHTML) has struggled to keep up with Chromium. Microsoft is finally giving up and moving its default Windows 10 browser to Chromium.”

Browser Wars 2018: Microsoft Edge versus Google Chrome (Make Tech Easier)

Make Tech Easier: Browser Wars 2018: Microsoft Edge versus Google Chrome. “According to October 2018 figures, Google Chrome’s top position among browsers remains unchallenged. Another browser, Microsoft Edge, is winning rave reviews with its redesigned features and smoother navigation. But is Edge really the future of browsers as Microsoft would have us all believe? To find out, we pitted Edge against Chrome in a toe-to-toe contest to see which is the better browser.”