TechCrunch: 4 signs your product is not as accessible as you think

TechCrunch: 4 signs your product is not as accessible as you think. “For too many companies, accessibility wasn’t baked into their products from the start, meaning they now find themselves trying to figure out how to inject it retrospectively. But bringing decades-long legacy code and design into the future isn’t easy (or cheap). Businesses have to overcome the fear and uncertainty about how to do such retrofitting, address the lack of education to launch such projects, and balance the scope of these iterations while still maintaining other production work.”

Fast Company: These are the world’s most sustainable fonts

Fast Company: These are the world’s most sustainable fonts. “You probably haven’t thought about whether some websites can be more sustainable than others, but in fact, web design choices can affect how much energy the site uses. In this case, the Formafantasma team made visual choices that had a direct effect on the site’s sustainability. They didn’t just choose Times New Roman and Arial because they liked them, but because they’re standard default typefaces—and therefore, the most sustainable typefaces on the web.”

Wired: All the Social Media Giants Are Becoming the Same

Wired: All the Social Media Giants Are Becoming the Same. “Companies are always eyeing their competitors to see what works; that’s just market research. But copycatting on social media has led to platforms that look suspiciously similar, with fewer things that set them apart. It’s harder to know what any given platform is for when they all do the same thing. Which major platform has a news feed, disappearing posts, private messaging, and a live broadcasting feature? That would be … all of them.”

Fast Company: Facebook’s big redesign broke News Feed extensions—including some fact-checkers

Fast Company: Facebook’s big redesign broke News Feed extensions—including some fact-checkers. “In May of this year, Facebook started rolling out a major redesign for its website, with a more modern look, big navigation buttons on top, and a greater emphasis on Groups. While the overhaul was overdue, it also turned several third-party browser extensions into collateral damage, including ones that help users evaluate the trustworthiness of news stories and customize their feeds.”

Search Engine Journal: How to Find Every Orphan Page on Your Website

Search Engine Journal: How to Find Every Orphan Page on Your Website. “Finding webpages that have no links is difficult, but not impossible. If there are pages on your website that users and search engines can’t reach, this is a problem you need to fix. Fast. These types of pages have a name: orphan pages. In this post, you’ll learn what orphan pages are, why fixing them is important for SEO, and how to find every orphan page on your site.”

Wired: How to Spot—and Avoid—Dark Patterns on the Web

Wired: How to Spot—and Avoid—Dark Patterns on the Web . “The term ‘dark patterns’ was first coined by UX specialist Harry Brignull to describe the ways in which software can subtly trick users into doing things they didn’t mean to do, or discouraging behavior that’s bad for the company. When you want to unsubscribe from a mailing list, but the ‘Unsubscribe’ button is tiny, low-contrast, and buried in paragraphs of text at the bottom of an email, it’s a strong sign the company is putting up subtle roadblocks between you and cancellation.”

Search Engine Journal: A Beginner’s Guide to ADA Website Accessibility Compliance

Search Engine Journal: A Beginner’s Guide to ADA Website Accessibility Compliance. “The lack of websites and mobile apps that pass accessibility compliance standards was disappointing news for accessibility advocates. When schools and businesses closed due to COVID-19, the public turned to the web for supplies, services, education, information, and access to their jobs. What they discovered were websites and apps they could not use.”

OneZero: What a Better Social Network Would Look Like

OneZero: What a Better Social Network Would Look Like . “Tuesday evening, New York Times writer Charlie Warzel casually tweeted a version of this question to his followers, not expecting much of a response. ‘Odd question but: what are your most far-fetched utopian ideas for fixing social media platforms?’ he asked. ‘The stuff that’s likely never ever gonna happen.’ More than 1,000 replies later, the thread was packed with provocative proposals, which together show that there is not only a tremendous appetite for change but a constellation of bright ideas for what that change could be.”

Artnet: Are You an Artist Looking for Work? This New Website Wants to Connect You With Paying Customers Hungry to Learn How to Make Art

Artnet: Are You an Artist Looking for Work? This New Website Wants to Connect You With Paying Customers Hungry to Learn How to Make Art. “[The site] is designed to work similarly to TaskRabbit or Fiverr, websites that link gig workers to employers looking for people to do one-off jobs. It invites photographers, dancers, and website designers, among those in other disciplines, to sell their skills and knowledge to anyone looking for art lessons, or even to buy artworks. It’s free to sign up, and unlike other sites, HireArtists doesn’t collect a fee.”

BetaNews: New website creation platform delivers advanced capabilities for web professionals

BetaNews: New website creation platform delivers advanced capabilities for web professionals. “Since its launch in 2007, cloud-based platform Wix has established itself as a favorite of people who want to build their own websites. Now though the company is branching out with the launch of Editor X, a new platform aimed at designers, web professionals and agencies.”

PC World: Google decides to ‘iterate’ on its deceptive favicon search plan

PC World: Google decides to ‘iterate’ on its deceptive favicon search plan . “Last week, Google began putting small favicons (website icons, such as the small power-button icon that appears in the browser tab when you visit PCWorld.com) next to search results in its desktop search. Critics called the favicons too visually similar to the small ‘Ad’ label that Google attaches to sponsored results at the top of the page, and thus confusing to users. As of Friday, Google had removed the favicons from general Google search results in its Chrome browser.”

Lifehacker AU: How To Fix Google’s Ugly, Logo-Filled Search Results

Lifehacker AU: How To Fix Google’s Ugly, Logo-Filled Search Results. “I had a feeling something was off the other day when I was doing some Googling. As it turns out, Google has redesigned its search results page a bit, adding in favicons, a big ‘AD’ icon for sponsored results, and shuffling around the placement of site URLs. At the risk of sounding like the cantankerous muppets Waldorf and Statler, I don’t like it. And if you share my lack of joy about these cluttered results, it’s possible to eliminate some of the changes Google made and restore peace and order to your searches.”

Hongkiat: Live Test Fonts On Browser Easily With Font Dragr

Hongkiat: Live Test Fonts On Browser Easily With Font Dragr . “The font used on the website affects to the reading experience of the users which is why web designers often spend a lot of their time finding good fonts pair that will suit their website’s design. We pick a font, then convert it to a Web-compatible format, and then add it into the style-rules. It’s far from efficient, especially when you have to repeat the process multiple times, with multiple fonts. Here is an alternative: Font Dragr.”