Quartz: The early internet is breaking—meet the people saving it

Quartz: The early internet is breaking—meet the people saving it. “In 1999, Olia Lialina taught web design in Germany. In class, she’d use amateur sites as examples of what not to do. But then, Lialina realized that those pages were disappearing. So she began to collect, and, eventually, study them to understand the values embedded within the early web’s ever-present starry night backgrounds, Mail Me buttons, and welcome signs.”

Gizmodo: How to Take Control of Where Every Link on Your Phone or Computer Opens Up

Gizmodo: How to Take Control of Where Every Link on Your Phone or Computer Opens Up. “Links make the digital world go round—links to your Twitter profile or the daily headlines or a file stored in the cloud. Being able to manage those links and open them more efficiently can be a bigger time-saver in your day than you might think… and so we’re going to outline how you can take more control over your links on mobile and desktop.”

Ars Technica: Behold, the most (intentionally) poorly designed website ever created

Ars Technica: Behold, the most (intentionally) poorly designed website ever created. “Sometimes we take Web and user interface design for granted—that’s the point of User Inyerface, a hilariously and deliberately difficult-to-use website created to show just how much we rely on past habits and design conventions to interact with the Web and our digital devices.”

The Next Web: The Wayback Machine can now highlight changes in copy on websites

The Next Web: The Wayback Machine can now highlight changes in copy on websites. “The new feature, called ‘Changes,’ lets you compare two different archives of a given URL. It gives a side-by-side comparison, with changes highlighted in blue (added content) and yellow (deleted content).” ooo!

Search Engine Journal: How to Use Archived Versions of Websites for SEO Troubleshooting

Search Engine Journal: How to Use Archived Versions of Websites for SEO Troubleshooting . What a great article idea. “Whenever I am working on a project that involves a steep change in traffic either for my core site or a competitors, one of the first places I will look the cached pages before and after the changes in traffic. Even if you aren’t doing forensic analysis on a site, just having access to a site’s changelog can be a valuable tool.”

Quartz: 2020 candidates’ 404 pages, ranked by cringe factor

Quartz: 2020 candidates’ 404 pages, ranked by cringe factor. “Presidential campaigns have found a way to use every part of the internet to spread extremely-carefully-scripted-but-totally-relatable content about their candidates. The final frontier: their campaign websites’ 404 messages—that is, the error page that pops up when you click on a broken link or try to navigate to a URL within the site that doesn’t exist.”

Computerworld: National Library launches ‘enormous’ archive of Australia’s Internet

Computerworld: National Library launches ‘enormous’ archive of Australia’s Internet. “‘The Australian Web Archive [AWA] is one of the biggest in the world. And when we say big, we mean enormous,’ says director general of the National Library of Australia, Dr Marie-Louise Ayres. The new archive, which launched last week, contains around 600 terabytes of data across 9 billion records. In bookshelf terms; if the records were printed and stacked they would stretch from Canberra to Cairns.”