The Citizens Voice: Online database helps track down ‘Boozicorns’ available statewide

The Citizens’ Voice: Online database helps track down ‘Boozicorns’ available statewide. “Pennsylvania’s regulation of wine and spirits offers unique frustrations and, sometimes, opportunities. One of the opportunities is the ability to search the entire state for specific products through the state’s centralized web portal. Anyone who does this regularly will see how often odd lots of wine or spirits— a bottle or a few — may be tucked away somewhere, frustratingly, in Bryn Mawr or Cambria County. A wise-cracky techie created a program and website to scrape the data for those odd lots available in just a single store and dubbed them Boozicorns. ”

TechCrunch: Millions of Venmo transactions scraped in warning over privacy settings

TechCrunch: Millions of Venmo transactions scraped in warning over privacy settings. “A computer science student has scraped seven million Venmo transactions to prove that users’ public activity can still be easily obtained, a year after a privacy researcher downloaded hundreds of millions of Venmo transactions in a similar feat. Dan Salmon said he scraped the transactions during a cumulative six months to raise awareness and warn users to set their Venmo payments to private.”

Hongkiat: 10 Best Web Scraping Tools to Extract Online Data

Hongkiat: 10 Best Web Scraping Tools to Extract Online Data. “Web Scraping tools are specifically developed for extracting information from websites. They are also known as web harvesting tools or web data extraction tools. These tools are useful for anyone trying to collect some form of data from the Internet. Web Scraping is the new data entry technique that don’t require repetitive typing or copy-pasting.”

MakeUseOf: What Is Web Scraping? How to Collect Data From Websites

MakeUseOf: What Is Web Scraping? How to Collect Data From Websites. “Think of a type of data and you can probably collect it by scraping the web. Real estate listings, sports data, email addresses of businesses in your area, and even the lyrics from your favorite artist can all be sought out and saved by writing a small script.” This article has a couple of good examples, but it’s mostly an overview (this is not meant as a criticism; it’s an incredibly broad topic that nobody could cover in one article!)

Graham Cluley: Facebook knew for years scammers were harvesting users’ details with phone number searches. Did nothing

Graham Cluley: Facebook knew for years scammers were harvesting users’ details with phone number searches. Did nothing. “Facebook ignored a widely-known privacy flaw for years, allowing scammers, spammers, and other malicious parties to scoop up virtually all users’ names and profile details. As I explained way back in 2012, when I was writing for the Sophos Naked Security blog, simply entering someone’s phone number or email address into Facebook’s search box would perform a reverse look-up and tell you who it belonged to, with any information they shared publicly on their Facebook profile.”

Techdirt: Court Says Scraping Websites And Creating Fake Profiles Can Be Protected By The First Amendment

Techdirt: Court Says Scraping Websites And Creating Fake Profiles Can Be Protected By The First Amendment. “It’s no secret that the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) is a mess. Originally written by a confused and panicked Congress in the wake of the 1980s movie War Games, it was supposed to be an ‘anti-hacking’ law, but was written so broadly that it has been used over and over again against any sort of ‘things that happen on a computer.’ It has been (not so jokingly) referred to as ‘the law that sticks,’ because when someone has done something “icky” using a computer, if no other law is found to be broken, someone can almost always find some weird way to interpret the CFAA to claim it’s been violated. The two most problematic parts of the CFAA are the fact that it applies to ‘unauthorized access’ or to ‘exceeding authorized access’ on any ‘computer… which is used in or affecting interstate or foreign commerce or communications.’ In 1986 that may have seemed limited. But, today, that means any computer on the internet. Which means basically any computer.”