Library of Congress: Announcing the Professional Organizations for Performing Arts Web Archive

Library of Congress: Announcing the Professional Organizations for Performing Arts Web Archive . “I am excited to share the Music Division’s latest web archive collection, the Professional Organizations for Performing Arts Web Archive! This collection contains websites and select social media to document professional networks in the performing arts over time. The collection items are those of professional, labor, and advocacy organizations at regional, national, and international levels. Its initial batch of 85 archived websites is ready for you to explore in our digital collections. By the summer, expect at least 100!”

NixIntel: Make Your Own Internet Archive With Archive Box

NixIntel: Make Your Own Internet Archive With Archive Box. “Hunchly is excellent for capturing web pages, but I still like to supplement it with YouTube-dl for grabbing video content. Recently I’ve also started using Archive Box to build offline archives of web content that I want to keep…. Archive Box can build full archives of the websites listed in your bookmarks, browser history, or from a list of custom URLs that you provide. In the rest of this post I’ll show you how you can set up and install Archive Box and start to archive your own pages.”

Just Launched: U.S. Women’s and Girls’ Magazines Web Archive (Columbia University)

Columbia University: Just Launched: U.S. Women’s and Girls’ Magazines Web Archive. “Developed by librarians within the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation, the archive consists of websites of women’s media that previously existed as print magazines and have long documented women’s thoughts, activities, economic power, sexuality, political interests, social, cultural, and domestic life.”

Wired UK: Inside Radiohead’s mission to archive everything

Wired UK: Inside Radiohead’s mission to archive everything . “In January 2020, the many strange iterations of Radiohead’s multiple websites were brought back to life when the band launched the Radiohead Public Library. If you visit radiohead.com today, you’re greeted with neatly organised digital ‘shelves’, stacked with music, high-quality videos, merch and ephemera from every era of the band. Most of those preserved websites are deliberately opaque. One, from the era of The Bends (the critically acclaimed album released in 1995), collects negative reviews of the website itself on a neon background. (‘Do NOT visit this site. It is confusing, garbled rubbish,’ reads one.) But, if the Radiohead of the early 2000s found innovation in obfuscation, in 2020 the band has recognised that a truly radical online act is to actually provide clarity.”