Make Tech Easier: Why You Should Use Two Browsers for Your Daily Browsing

Make Tech Easier: Why You Should Use Two Browsers for Your Daily Browsing. “When you use browser compartmentalization, you use different browsers for different activities, and you are strict about following your rules for when to use which browser. Using separate browsers for separate activities will stop companies from tracking information between sites with different identifying information. Tracking cookies cannot follow between different browsers.”

The Register: Firefox 74 slams Facebook in solitary confinement: Browser add-on stops social network stalking users across the web

The Register: Firefox 74 slams Facebook in solitary confinement: Browser add-on stops social network stalking users across the web. “The purpose of the Facebook Container is to let you continue to use Facebook but without having the social network site track your browsing elsewhere. ‘Installing this extension closes your Facebook tabs, deletes your Facebook cookies, and logs you out of Facebook,’ say the docs.”

CNET: Privacy-focused DuckDuckGo launches new effort to block online tracking

CNET: Privacy-focused DuckDuckGo launches new effort to block online tracking. “The company said Thursday it’s started sharing a data set called Tracker Radar that details 5,326 internet domains used by 1,727 companies and organizations that track you online. The data is available to anyone, and browser maker Vivaldi said on Tuesday it has begun doing so.”

Privacy International: No, Facebook’s is not telling you everything

Privacy International: No, Facebook’s is not telling you everything. “Privacy International recently tested the feature to download all ‘Ads and Business’ related information (You can accessed it by Clicking on Settings > Your Facebook Information > Download Your Information). This is meant to tell users which advertisers have been targeting them with ads and under which circumstances. We found that information provided is less than accurate. To put it simply, this tool is not what Facebook claims. The list of advertisers is incomplete and changes over time.”

Gizmodo UK: Facebook’s ‘Clear History’ Tool Doesn’t Clear Shit

Gizmodo UK: Facebook’s ‘Clear History’ Tool Doesn’t Clear Shit. “By using this tool, you’re just telling Facebook to put the data it has on you into two separate buckets that are otherwise mixed together. Put another way, Facebook is offering a one-stop-shop to opt-out of any ties between the sites and services you peruse daily that have some sort of Facebook software installed and your own-platform activity on Facebook or Instagram. The only thing you’re clearing is a connection Facebook made between its data and the data it gets from third parties, not the data itself.” If you don’t like swearing, avoid this article — it’s saltier than condensed soup.

EFF: How to Change Your Off-Facebook Activity Settings

EFF: How to Change Your Off-Facebook Activity Settings. “This tutorial will guide you through the steps to not only “clear” the off-Facebook activity already linked with your account, but also to prevent future activity from being associated with your account going forward. Note that this won’t stop third parties from sending Facebook information about you—it will only stop Facebook from associating that information with your account.”

TechCrunch: All users can now access Facebook’s tool for controlling which apps and sites can share data for ad-targeting

TechCrunch: All users can now access Facebook’s tool for controlling which apps and sites can share data for ad-targeting. “When the tool was initially announced in 2018, it had a much more user-friendly name — ‘Clear History.’ But Facebook believed that could confuse users who may think that the tool had something to do with wiping out their Facebook data published to the social network itself. The new name is meant to better clarify what kind of data is getting deleted — ‘Off-Facebook Activity.'”