Wired: Google Fights Against Canada’s Order To Change Global Search Results

Wired: Google Fights Against Canada’s Order To Change Global Search Results. “IN JUNE, CANADA’S Supreme Court came down on Google—hard. It ruled that the tech giant must take down certain Google search results for pirated products. And not just in Canada, but globally. Now, Google is going south of the Canadian border to push back on this landmark court ruling. The tech giant filed an injunction Monday with the US District Court for Northern California, arguing that globally removing the search results violates US law, and thus Google should not be forced to comply with the Canadian ruling.”

The Web’s Big Problem: Change for the Sake of Change (John Dvorak)

John Dvorak: The Web’s Big Problem: Change for the Sake of Change. “Google News was once a decent resource for catching up with the news in the morning or when something interesting happened. It was concise, usable, and you were able—at a single glance—to get a clue as to what might be important. All that is gone.” He is spot on. I find it hard to believe that Google deliberately made the Google News redesign so awful – but they did!

A Million Squandered: The “Million Dollar Homepage” as a Decaying Digital Artifact (John Bowers)

John Bowers at Harvard: A Million Squandered: The “Million Dollar Homepage” as a Decaying Digital Artifact. “While most of the graphical elements on the Million Dollar Homepage are promotional in nature, it seems safe to say that the buying craze was motivated by a deeper fixation on the site’s perceived importance as a digital artifact. A banner at the top of the page reads ‘Own a Piece of Internet History,’ a fair claim given the coverage that it received in the blogosphere and in the popular press….But to what extent has this history been preserved? Does the Million Dollar Homepage represent a robust digital artifact 12 years after its creation, or has it fallen prey to the ephemerality common to internet content?” If you want an exhibit A to the problems of digital impermanence and linkrot, READ THIS.

Irish Times: Digital Irish content in danger of disappearing, specialist warns

Irish Times: Digital Irish content in danger of disappearing, specialist warns. “Ger Wilson, head of digital collections at the National Library of Ireland, said that with its research showing that as much as 50 per cent of website content can disappear within a year, it is ‘highly likely’ that some critical material has already disappeared. She was speaking following the issuing of a tender notice by the library to carry out an extensive crawl of Irish-registered domains later this year. This is part of an attempt to archive the Irish web so that historians of the future will be able to see what the Irish internet looked like in 2017.”

Forbes: Why We Need To Archive The Web In Order To Preserve Twitter

Forbes: Why We Need To Archive The Web In Order To Preserve Twitter. “As social media has become an ever-more central medium through which global society communicates, there has been considerable discussion about just how libraries and archives can work to preserve these walled gardens in the same way that web archives like the Internet Archive have worked to preserve the open web. Twitter in particular has been a keen focus of the social archiving community due to its streaming APIs and default public nature of most communications sent through the platform. Indeed, in 2010 the Library of Congress received a donation of the entire historical backfile of Twitter and continues to archive all public tweets through present day. Is this doomsday archive by itself truly sufficient to fully preserve Twitter for future generations?” Great article. Not particularly encouraging, but great.

Internet Archive: IMLS Grant to Advance Web Archiving in Public Libraries

Internet Archive: IMLS Grant to Advance Web Archiving in Public Libraries. “Working with partners from Queens Public Library, Cleveland Public Library, and San Francisco Public Library, and with OCLC’s WebJunction, which offers education and training to public libraries nationwide, the ‘Community Webs’ project will provide training, cohort support, and services, for a group of librarians at 15 different public libraries to develop expertise in creating collections of historically valuable web materials documenting their local communities. Project outputs will include over 30 terabytes of community history web archives and a suite of open educational resources, from guides to videos, for use by any librarian, archivist, or heritage professional working to preserve collections of local history comprised of online materials.”

Open Source: LinkArchiver automatically submits links to the Internet Archive

Open Source: LinkArchiver automatically submits links to the Internet Archive. “The internet is forever, except when it isn’t. “Link rot”—where once-valid links to websites become broken over time as pages move or sites go offline—is a real problem for people who try to do research online. The Internet Archive helps solve this problem by making submitted content available in the ‘Wayback Machine.’ The difficulty, of course, is getting people to remember to submit links for archival.”