Lifehacker: To Make Websites Load Faster, Browse the Web Like a European

Lifehacker: To Make Websites Load Faster, Browse the Web Like a European. “We now live in a GDPR world. GDPR, in case you didn’t know, stands for the European Union’s ‘General Data Protection Regulation’ privacy law, which kicked into effect May 25 and caused every service you’ve ever used to blow up your inbox over the last month…. Curiously enough, GDPR might also improve your browsing speeds—at least, according to a few sources who have performed some hands-on testing across a number of sites. “

The Next Web: Adblock Plus now blocks social media tracking for Chrome & Firefox

The Next Web: Adblock Plus now blocks social media tracking for Chrome & Firefox. “Adblock today announced it was joining the fight against social media tracking by allowing users to block what has become so ubiquitous on almost every site out there. Specifically, the tracking which Adblock Plus now aims to thwart is that which originates from social media buttons.”

PRWeb: JsonWHOIS is Now Offering Complete Whois Database Download (PRESS RELEASE)

PRWeb: JsonWHOIS is Now Offering Complete Whois Database Download (PRESS RELEASE). “JsonWHOIS, a company specializing in domain Whois API services, announced today they would begin offering access to complete whois database download. The announcement means the company will now offer users access to close than 300 million active domain names with WHOIS records, including data on important dates like expiration and creation, owner and contact information, name servers, and social data including counts from websites including Google, Twitter, and Facebook.” As you might imagine, this is not free.

Motherboard: Motherboard Made a Tool That Archives Websites on Demand

Motherboard: Motherboard Made a Tool That Archives Websites on Demand. “Archiving services, such as the Wayback Machine, may be a staple of online journalism, but they sometimes have a problem. While, say, Archive.is might preserve one particular webpage, perhaps the Wayback Machine can’t, depending on what sort of restrictions the website developer has put in place. For example, someone stopped copies of MSNBC host Joy Reid’s blog, which hosted a stream of homophobic comments, from displaying in the Wayback Machine. With that in mind, I made a quick tool that can push a single webpage or URL to multiple archiving sites at once, and fire back the newly minted digital copies in response. Hopefully it will help reporters and researchers more efficiently figure out which service will work best for that particular site.”

Genealogy’s Star: Click Your Way Genealogical Success Online – Part One

Genealogy’s Star: Click Your Way Genealogical Success Online – Part One. “If you have adequate computer skills and a desire to do genealogical research, I am writing to you. You may even have attended classes on using technology for genealogical research. But classes on the subject of online research usually focus on websites and resources rather than methodology. This series is not exclusively about Google or any other specific website. It is about learning how to use online resources in a way that materially assists you in finding your ancestors and other relatives.”

Hacker Noon: The Future has a Subscription Fee

Hacker Noon: The Future has a Subscription Fee. “In this day and age, you can pay for travelling in China with Apple Pay while cash barely exists anymore in China due to WeChat Pay and Alipay and here in the west Amazon Prime was years ahead of its time with its subscription model that’s always adding even more value. Even Uber now offer bike-sharing and access to some transportation services. As tech consolidates it’s all about offering the most value in one app and in one subscription fee. The era of stand-alone subscription fees like Netflix, may not be forever.”

American Alliance of Museums: The World Doesn’t Need Another Website

American Alliance of Museums: The World Doesn’t Need Another Website. “So many of those websites assume that we are merely passive consumers who gobble up whatever content is in front of us. Today – when information seems to proliferate without end and when discriminating quality and trustworthiness is becoming increasingly more difficult, ‘just a website’ can’t hope to represent the complexity that is part-and-parcel of what it means to understand the world today. It strikes me that these are the same challenges that you as museum professionals are faced with every day. It seems right, therefore, that a digital platform built for this community should endeavor to wrestle with the same complexities that you do.” Lot of great thinking, lot of pointers to great thoughts.