Before Netscape: The forgotten Web browsers of the early 1990s (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: Before Netscape: The forgotten Web browsers of the early 1990s. “Update: It’s Memorial Day weekend here in the US, and the Ars staff has a long weekend accordingly. 2019 marks 30 years since Tim Berners-Lee worked at CERN and came up with a little idea known as the World Wide Web. As all of us do a little Web browsing this weekend, we thought resurfacing this piece outlining those early browsers might make all of us even appreciate Internet Explorer today. This story originally ran on Oct. 11, 2011, and it appears unchanged below.” Obviously not Memorial Day weekend now, but this sat in my Pocket queue for a bit. Still a good read, especially for those of use who used Cello, Mosaic, etc. In other words, get off my lawn…

Engadget: Mozilla is helping to make web-based VR available to everyone

Engadget: Mozilla is helping to make web-based VR available to everyone . “Even though virtual reality has been in the mainstream for several years now, it’s still not very accessible. It often takes trained engineers to create, release and distribute VR content. That could soon change, however, thanks to a new project called Reach, a VR platform created by Emblematic Group and VR pioneer Nonny de la Peña (whom we’ve featured on the Engadget Experience stage before). Built on top of WebVR and in partnership with Mozilla, the project was initially announced at Sundance 2019 earlier this year in its alpha stage. Starting today, however, it’s finally moving into beta. The end goal: to make web-based VR easier to create and consume.” Who remembers VRML? Good gravy I’m old.

BetaNews: Free test checks website security and PCI DSS compliance

BetaNews: Free test checks website security and PCI DSS compliance. “Good website security is essential to give customers confidence in your business, but for smaller organizations testing can prove difficult. To address this issue, security testing and risk rating company ImmuniWeb is launching a free website security test that can be used by anyone.”

Search Engine Roundtable: Should Google Index The Entire Web & Not Cherry Pick Pages To Index?

Search Engine Roundtable: Should Google Index The Entire Web & Not Cherry Pick Pages To Index?. “For years and years Google has told us Google doesn’t index all the content and URLs they know about on the web. No just because there is a directive telling them not to but because Google chooses not to index those pages because of various factors like PageRank, duplication, other quality signals. But a WebmasterWorld thread is asking, should they index the whole web?”

Breaking: A New “News” Archive! (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Breaking: A New “News” Archive!. “A new digital collection, The General News on the Internet, is a free archive of online-only news sites collected from the web. The Library of Congress began preserving these sites in June 2014. How are these news-based sites captured? The Library uses a hybrid approach of weekly captures of the websites, augmented with twice-daily capture of known RSS feeds (Real Simple Syndication). This produces a more complete news archive. Given the dynamic nature of the 24-hour news cycle of today, these archives are meant to capture as much of the news distribution as possible given current limitations in technology and resources.”

The World Wide Web Turns 30: Our Favorite Memories From A To Z (The Verge)

The Verge: The World Wide Web Turns 30: Our Favorite Memories From A To Z. “Over the past 30 years, major portions of the web have come and gone. They’ve made us laugh and cringe, let us waste time and find friends, and reshaped the world in the process. For its anniversary, we’re looking back at some of our favorite websites, from A to Z, as well as some key people and technologies. Of course, there was far too much good stuff to include, so we had to note some additional favorites along the way.”

The Verge: Tim Berners-Lee says we can still save the web

The Verge: Tim Berners-Lee says we can still save the web. “The World Wide Web is 30 years old tomorrow. A day earlier, its founder, English engineer and computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee, first proposed the system that would become the WWW on March 11th, 1989. To acknowledge the anniversary, he’s revisited his ideas about the internet in a new letter published today.”